IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Europe: A History (1996)

de Norman Davies

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
2,100215,515 (3.99)38
From the ice age to the Cold War, from Reykjavik to the Volga, from Minos to Margaret Thatcher, Norman Davies here tells the entire history of Europe in one single volume. The narrative zooms in from the distant focus of Chapter One, which explores the first five million years of the continent's development, to the close focus of the last two chapters, which cover the twentieth century at roughly one page per year. In between, Norman Davies presents a vast canvas packed with startling detail and thoughtful analysis. Alongside Europe's better-known stories - human, national and international - he examines subjects often spurned or neglected - Europe's stateless nations, for example, as well as the nation-states and great powers, and the minority groups from heretics and lepers to Romanies, Jews, and Muslims. He reveals not only the rich diversity of Europe's past but also the numerous prisms through which it can be viewed.… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 38 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 21 (següent | mostra-les totes)
In a fit of ambition five months ago at the beach in Casablanca, I downloaded and started Norman Davies’ epic Europe: A History. I’m not sure I’ve ever been quite so proud to click that “I’m Finished” button on my GoodReads update page. On my Kindle, the page count reads upwards of sixteen hundred pages. However, with the opening chapter an easily digestible introduction to the physical and prehistoric beginnings of the cultures that came to be called collectively European, I felt like the book would fly by as quickly as a book with chapters over a hundred pages could. I was wrong. That first chapter is structured, with headings and concise sections of information. Very early on, Davies throws in the trivia blurbs – while the Kindle couldn’t handle the formatting of these sections with much ease, I greatly enjoyed not only the liveliness that these somewhat informal additions of information added, but also the context they provided. Or, rather, the contexts in which they were provided – that is, I enjoyed seeing those bracketed titles over and over again throughout different epics of the book. (For better or for worse, the one that springs to mind first is the “Condom” one – it comes up in the middle ages, later on in the seventeenth or eighteenth century, and then again in the twentieth century.) Not all of them reappear throughout the ages, but the ones that do provide a nice line of progress (or anti-progress, as the case may be) over the centuries. Apart from that first chapter and the numerous brief interruptions that keep it ever so mildly entertaining, the whole middle section turns to mush. He rushes through plenty of the more interesting parts of the Greek and Roman empires (including the civil war) only to harp on for what feels like forever about the Holy Roman Empire. Commendably, he includes much detail about the countries of Eastern Europe. Regrettably, I missed whatever initial introduction there may have been and spent most of the middle of the book confused and bored. I struggled to find the storyline. I only followed the timeline of the Eastern Europe toward the last couple chapters, and at that point, I’m fairly sure it was just excitement about having only a handful (uh, relative term) of pages left. I did enjoy the last two chapters, though – even when he glossed over major events like the tearing down of the Berlin Wall in half a sentence. By the end, I kind of felt like I needed to reread the whole middle part (not any time soon, mind you) because I had grasped the cultures and the personalities in those chapters even with a very hazy background. Davies’ Europe: A History reviewed much of the information I’d learned years ago in AP World History back in high school in almost an equally boring fashion, but the interjectory plates added a bit more interest to a painfully unstructured book. ( )
  revatait | Feb 21, 2021 |
At first I thought this would be very slow and detailed given the book's length but then very quickly realised this will have to fly through history at lightspeed - before reading this book I never realised how rich it is because most books only try to cover one aspect of it. I gorged myself on this book for two days and it was an amazing ride through the glorious and terrifying history of Europe.

The book assumes that you haven't been sleeping through history class at school so will not spoonfeed you basic history. ( )
  TeaTimeCoder | Dec 23, 2020 |
This is one monster of a volume. It is well done, researched and put together. But it has some serious problems with the way it is laid out. The pages of side notes are informative but all together they only slow the pace of the book down. Constantly having to go back and forth and read them. You don't want to pass them up because you do not know what you might miss. So when you attack this volume you have to make a precise battle plan on how you are going to achieve the goal of finishing it. I would give it 4 stars but 3 will have to do because of the back and forth. ( )
  Joe73 | Mar 22, 2018 |
Książka "Europa. Rozprawa historyka z historią" powinna znaleźć się na półce każdego, który chociaż trochę interesuje się historią. Dodatkowo ci, który do tej pory nie interesowali się historią mogą to zainteresowanie odkryć po lekturze tejże książki. Może ona odpychać swoim ogromem i ciężarem fizycznym (ok. 2 kg ), ale na pewno nie treścią, gdyż została napisana w sposób nadzwyczaj lekki.

Pojawiające się na prawie każdej stronie "pigułki" z hasłami znajdującymi się w tekście, a tutaj wyjaśnione szerzej, dają wrażenie leksykonu wiedzy o życiu w Europie na przestrzeni wieków. Wracając do samej formy tekstu należy zauważyć, iż nie jest on napisany językiem akademickim, czysto naukowym, który zniechęcałby do niej ludzi spoza grona historyków. Przekazem książki jest rola popularyzatorska danej materii, w tym przypadku historii Europy. Dodatkowo wielkim atutem jest kompendium na końcu książki, które jest bardzo przydatne nawet jeśli nie szukamy czegoś związanego z tekstem. Przykładowo jeśli w tekście pojawi się jakiś władca, który umknął naszej pamięci, możemy go odnaleźć na końcu książki.

Podsumowując książka jest pozycją absolutnie obowiązkową, jeśli ktoś pragnie zgłębić historię powszechną Europy, a męczą go podręczniki akademickie. Jeśli ktoś ma na tyle mocne ramiona lub twardy brzuch ( dotyczy to tych, co czytają na leżąco ) to książka ta pochłonie wiele godzin z życia przepełnionych ciekawymi faktami. Może trudno w to uwierzyć, ale książkę, mimo swojej grubości, czyta się bardzo szybko i ani człowiek się obejrzy, a już doczytał do końca. Jednym zdaniem zapraszam do lektury. ( )
  Carleyss | Jul 18, 2012 |
This is a voluminous but interesting survey of European history covering the scope of a World History or Western Civilization course. It reminds me of the expansive Will and Ariel Durant series on civilization although here it is confined to Europe alone. He posits numerous fault lines of history, religion, and culture while initially introducing the text and simply, but intriguingly, shifts the graphic illustrations throughout the work to shift the readers perspective from the traditional North-South-East-West European continuum to one that displays maps demonstrating Europe as one huge sub-continent. In this effort, he includes Eastern European evidence that is usually not included in standard European histories. I would fault Davies for being too critical of religion and he suspiciously reports religious history, and he may be too sympathetic for internationalist sympathies in his presentation of what constitutes "Europeanness."

One of the other limitations of the work is his use of odd capsules which are presented in boldface throughout the text of the work. The reader is then expected to dip into the highlighted sections as they can. In some instances the capsules bear little relation to the narrative, and in other cases they are quite revealing. However, by arranging the text in this way the reader is sometimes interrupted with irrelevant material, or in other instances, you may miss critical information. You never know which. I would have preferred that Davies would have followed a more typical, standard approach and performed the work of integrating his ideas more coherently to fit the narrative. Likewise, the appendices, which are often quite revealing, are not integrated into the work and they remain abstracted from the text at the end of the text. On the other hand, the material is valuable, as are the helpful and consistent mapping of Europe as viewed from the East with Great Britain at the top of the maps. In this way, Davies is expressing a basic motif developed throughout the text that he is including generally overlooked areas and material from Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and lesser examined regions of Europe.

None of the limitations detracts unduly from the work and Davies is to be commended for writing an interesting narrative and fresh approach for a generalist work on Europe.
1 vota gmicksmith | Jun 18, 2012 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 21 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
For Christian
Our Californian
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
This book contains little that is original.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (85)

African military systems (1800–1900)

Ambassadors and envoys from Russia to Poland (1763–1794)

Ancient Egyptian technology

Angevin kings of England

Arab–Byzantine wars

Battle of Praga

History of Poland in the Early Modern era (1569–1795)

History of prostitution

History of science in early cultures

History of the Jews in Europe

History of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1648)

History of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1648–1764)

Polish Constitution Day Parade

Polish culture during World War II

Polish minority in Russia

Political repression in the Soviet Union

Prussian Partition

Reception of Islam in Early Modern Europe

From the ice age to the Cold War, from Reykjavik to the Volga, from Minos to Margaret Thatcher, Norman Davies here tells the entire history of Europe in one single volume. The narrative zooms in from the distant focus of Chapter One, which explores the first five million years of the continent's development, to the close focus of the last two chapters, which cover the twentieth century at roughly one page per year. In between, Norman Davies presents a vast canvas packed with startling detail and thoughtful analysis. Alongside Europe's better-known stories - human, national and international - he examines subjects often spurned or neglected - Europe's stateless nations, for example, as well as the nation-states and great powers, and the minority groups from heretics and lepers to Romanies, Jews, and Muslims. He reveals not only the rich diversity of Europe's past but also the numerous prisms through which it can be viewed.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.99)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 9
2.5 6
3 36
3.5 5
4 90
4.5 15
5 61

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 155,895,362 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible