IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Lenin on the Train

de Catherine Merridale

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
2433082,410 (3.58)14
"A gripping, meticulously researched account of Lenin's fateful rail journey from Zurich to Petrograd, where he ignited the Russian Revolution and forever changed the world. In April 1917, as the Russian Tsar Nicholas II's abdication sent shockwaves across war-torn Europe, the future leader of the Bolshevik revolution Vladimir Lenin was far away, exiled in Zurich. When the news reached him, Lenin immediately resolved to return to Petrograd and lead the revolt. But to get there, he would have to cross Germany, which meant accepting help from the deadliest of Russia's adversaries. Germany saw an opportunity to further destabilize Russia by allowing Lenin and his small group of revolutionaries to return. Now, drawing on a dazzling array of sources and never-before-seen archival material, renowned historian Catherine Merridale provides a riveting, nuanced account of this enormously consequential journey--the train ride that changed the world--as well as the underground conspiracy and subterfuge that went into making it happen. Writing with the same insight and formidable intelligence that distinguished her earlier works, she brings to life a world of counter-espionage and intrigue, wartime desperation, illicit finance, and misguided utopianism. This was the moment when the Russian Revolution became Soviet, the genesis of a system of tyranny and faith that changed the course of Russia's history forever and transformed the international political climate"--… (més)

No n'hi ha cap.

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 14 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 31 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Lenin on the Train: The Journey that Changed the Course of History by Catherine Merridale is her sixth book on Russian/Soviet history. Merridale has a First Class degree in history from King's College, Cambridge and a Ph.D. from the University of Birmingham. Retiring from her academic career, Merridale became a freelance writer in 2014. She has written for the London Review of Books, the New Statesman, The Independent, The Guardian, and the Literary Review. She has also contributed to BBC Radio.

Arguably the twentieth century was a short century. On the historical scales, the century begins with the First World War and ends with the fall of the Soviet Union. Now, the early events are approaching their centennial marks and with that, there is renewed interest, new information, and thinking of the events. Lenin's train ride was an important event in world affairs that would run long and deep.

Germany, knowing America's entry into the war was only a matter of time would resort to other means to win the war. The war was financially breaking England and draining France of its male population at an alarming rate. Germany, however, was suffering in a two front war. Austria-Hungary, the country who initiated the war, turned out to be a very weak ally. German needed to remove Russia from the fighting and it had a plan.

The Germans knew that there were other ways of winning the war than the battlefield. By distracting the enemy with other problems, it would reduce their will to fight. If Mexico declared war on the US, the US would be unable to fight in Europe. If radicals in France became popular the will to fight would dwindle. If Germany could pull away from the Eastern front, they could concentrate on France and England before America entered the war. To remove Russia, Germany had to disrupt the fragile government and they had the man to do it. It was just a matter of transporting him to Russia.

To some moving one man through Germany and Finland to Russia might seem fairly insignificant. But the man transported eventually did remove Russia from the war. That benefit would eventually haunt Germany in the next World War and for almost fifty years afterward. The man in the train lead a revolution that became one of the focal points of the twentieth century. The spectre of communism became Leninism and Stalinism. The quick move for advantage backfired in the long run.

Merridale takes the reader on the best constructed and plausible route of Lenin's sealed train car. She jumps around quite a bit and perhaps is a bit lacking in background information, but considering her experience she most likely writes for an audience who already has a background in Russian history. For those with a Russian or World War I history experience, it is an excellent source of information on a lesser told part of history. All in all a great book for historians. For others, the light background on Russia and its problems before World War I might make this book a bit challenging.
( )
  evil_cyclist | Mar 16, 2020 |
In 1917, at the height of the First World War, Germany turned to a new weapon in their fight against the Allied Powers. They found a revolutionary called Lenin, who was living in neutral Zurich, stuck him on a sealed train, and fired him (in Churchill's words) ‘like a plague bacillus’ through Germany and into Russia.

‘What Lenin brought to Russia was class hatred, German money and elaborate works on the application of Marxism in Russia,’ as the chief of police in Petrograd put it (though how much Lenin was actually financed by the Germans is debatable). The point was that he, as a revolutionary socialist, was opposed to the war and would, it was hoped, pull Russia out of it altogether – so Berlin considered that ‘the interests of the German government are identical with those of the Russian revolutionaries’.

The journey was a complicated one, logistically, and Catherine Merridale does her best to retrace the route – but in the end, the train journey itself is the least of what's being written about here. It's an excuse to examine the state of the war, and of the world, in 1917, from the swarming network of spies and chancers, to the competing intellectual arguments about people power versus government authority.

Is the sealed train enough to hold the book together thematically? Well…just about.

It's a useful book for fleshing out the character of Lenin, someone marked by his total intransigence with anyone who disagreed with him even slightly, and also by a sort of infuriatingly fussy authoritarianism. Even on the journey in question, he was legislating his infamous ‘in-train rules’ about when people had to go to sleep and what hand-drawn vouchers they needed to use the toilet. It sounds like sheer pettiness, but the difference between that and the regime he established in Russia – ‘a stifling, cruel, sterile one, a workshop for decades of tyranny’ – is only one of scale.

Given the aims of the Germans in putting Lenin on this train, it is frustrating that Merridale never spells out the result of the journey: namely, that after Lenin's coup, the Bolsheviks did indeed sign a peace treaty with Germany. Unless I missed it, this simple fact is not even stated in the book.

In any case, the real punchline comes when she considers the fate of Lenin's companions on the train once Lenin had died and the journey had passed into myth. The people with him had experienced it as reality, not myth – which from Stalin's point of view meant they knew too much.

Zinoviev was shot with Kamenev in 1936. His son Stefan – who as a little boy in Switzerland had enchanted Lenin so much that the leader once attempted to adopt him – was shot in 1937. Zinoviev's second wife and travelling companion of 1917, who was exiled to one of the most northern labour colonies, was shot in 1938. […] In September 1937, and still protesting his innocence, [Shlyapnikov] was shot for his supposed involvement in Zinoviev's so-called conspiracy.… Radek and Sokolnikov were beaten to death in their respective labour camps within a few days of each other.… Fürstenberg was shot, as were his wife and son, after a fifteen-minute trial.

My problems with the book had to do with its focus – Merridale's prose, by contrast, and her powers of explanation, are excellent. So you need a fair working knowledge of the context, but if you have that, this book makes for a fascinating snapshot on a particularly freighted moment in European history. It's also enjoyable to imagine someone picking it up as an imagined sequel to Girl on the Train. ( )
  Widsith | May 9, 2019 |
Ressenya escrita per a Crítics Matiners de LibraryThing .
I studied Russian History in college and the title of this book promised some unknown insights. The problem? The book's title misrepresents what's on the pages. There is little told about the train ride. And, too much detail that perhaps could be better stated in a history class, and not a novel. By promising a picture of Lenin as he makes his way to St. Petersburg the author does not set the stage for a book more about the Russian Revolution than one might expect in this setting. Still, Merridale provides a look at the various forces building towards the development of Lenin as the eventual leader. But that might have been better placed in a book with a more definitive title and theme. ( )
  Travis1259 | Mar 7, 2019 |
Catherine Merridale, geboren 1959 in Großbritannien, ist Russlandhistorikerin. Sie promovierte 1987 in Cambridge und war anschließend Dozentin am King's College, Cambridge. Ab 1993 war sie Professorin für Geschichte an der Universität Bristol, seit 2004 lehrt sie an der Queen Mary University, London.
Im April 1917, auf dem Höhepunkt des Ersten Weltkriegs, kehrte Lenin aus seinem Schweizer Exil nach Russland zurück. Bis zum Spätherbst desselben Jahres sollte er mit den Bolschewiki die Macht im vormaligen Zarenreich übernommen haben. Die Russlandhistorikerin Catherine Merridale rekonstruiert Lenins folgenreiche Reise in einem bewachten und abgeriegelten Waggon von Zürich über Deutschland und Schweden bis nach Petrograd, dem heutigen Sankt Petersburg. Ausgehend von Lenins Zugfahrt, deren Route sie akribisch nachrecherchiert und selbst bereist hat, beschreibt sie die damit verbundenen diplomatischen Verwicklungen, politischen Ränkespiele und ideologischen Grabenkämpfe. Während Lenin sich für einen Umsturz in seiner Heimat bereit machte, versuchten die europäischen Großmächte - aus jeweils eigenem Kalkül - Einfluss auf das Geschehen zu nehmen. So ist Merridales Erzählung nicht nur der Bericht über einen entscheidenden Moment in der Geschichte des 20. Jahrhunderts - sie ist auch ein Panorama Europas kurz vor einer Revolution, die die Welt nachhaltig verändern sollte.
  Aficionado | Nov 8, 2018 |
Regular readers of these reviews know that I am no friend of mistitled books, and this one is a pretty egregious example of the breed. From the title, one would expect a laser beam approach to a minute but interesting subject; instead, we get a sprawl which tries to narrate and explain, inter alia, Allied diplomacy and espionage in Petrograd to try and keep Russia afloat and involved in WWI, German efforts to achieve the opposite, the factional feuding among international socialists and revolutionaries during the first years of the century, the February revolution, the Lvov and Kerensky governments, whether (and how) the Germans funded Lenin, and lots of backstory and introductions to the many characters in all of these threads. That's a lot of balls to keep in the air--thus Lenin gets on the eponymous train on page 145 and arrives in Petrograd with some ninety pages to go. And then, oddly, the book sputters to an abrupt halt in the summer of 1917 when nothing much was going on. It must be said that there is a lot of information to be had in the book, and that the author is a talented writer, but the involutions of socialist/revolutionary factionalism is not for most a high-interest subject, and given the book's considerable length, I wasn't too disappointed to see it end. ( )
  Big_Bang_Gorilla | Nov 7, 2018 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 31 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Her latest book, “Lenin on the Train,” has a tighter focus than these [earlier books on Soviet history] and vividly reminds us how the fateful events of 1917 depended on a seemingly small episode: Vladimir Lenin’s return to Russia from political exile in Switzerland.
 
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en suec. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en suec. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

"A gripping, meticulously researched account of Lenin's fateful rail journey from Zurich to Petrograd, where he ignited the Russian Revolution and forever changed the world. In April 1917, as the Russian Tsar Nicholas II's abdication sent shockwaves across war-torn Europe, the future leader of the Bolshevik revolution Vladimir Lenin was far away, exiled in Zurich. When the news reached him, Lenin immediately resolved to return to Petrograd and lead the revolt. But to get there, he would have to cross Germany, which meant accepting help from the deadliest of Russia's adversaries. Germany saw an opportunity to further destabilize Russia by allowing Lenin and his small group of revolutionaries to return. Now, drawing on a dazzling array of sources and never-before-seen archival material, renowned historian Catherine Merridale provides a riveting, nuanced account of this enormously consequential journey--the train ride that changed the world--as well as the underground conspiracy and subterfuge that went into making it happen. Writing with the same insight and formidable intelligence that distinguished her earlier works, she brings to life a world of counter-espionage and intrigue, wartime desperation, illicit finance, and misguided utopianism. This was the moment when the Russian Revolution became Soviet, the genesis of a system of tyranny and faith that changed the course of Russia's history forever and transformed the international political climate"--

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Autor amb llibres seus als Crítics Matiners de LibraryThing

El llibre de Catherine Merridale Lenin on the Train estava disponible a LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Dóna't d'alta per obtenir una còpia prèvia a canvi d'una ressenya.

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.58)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 3
2.5 1
3 11
3.5 11
4 23
4.5 3
5 2

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 155,544,939 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible