Imatge de l'autor

Alison Croggon

Autor/a de The Naming

30+ obres 6,548 Membres 146 Ressenyes 25 preferits

Sobre l'autor

Alison Croggon was born in the Transvaal, South Africa in 1962. She worked as a journalist for the Melbourne Herald until 1985. Her first book of poems, This Is the Stone, was published in 1991 and won the Anne Elder Award and the Dame Mary Gilmore Prize. Her other books of poetry include The Blue mostra'n més Gate, Attempts at Being, The Common Flesh: New and Selected Poems, and Theatre. She also writes the children's fantasy series Pellinor. Her children's novel, The River and the Book, won the 2016 Wilderness Society Environment Award for Children¿s Literature, Fiction. She is Melbourne theatre critic for The Australian and keeps a blog of theatre criticism called Theatre Notes. In 2009, she was named Geraldine Pascall Critic of the Year. She has also written and had preformed nine theatrical works including the operas Gauguin and The Burrow, and the plays Lenz, Samarkand and The Famine, and Blue. (Bowker Author Biography) mostra'n menys
Crèdit de la imatge: Courtesy of Alison Croggon

Sèrie

Obres de Alison Croggon

The Naming (2002) 2,374 exemplars
The Riddle (2004) 1,538 exemplars
The Crow (2006) 1,206 exemplars
The Singing (2008) 956 exemplars
Black Spring (2012) 149 exemplars
The Bone Queen (2016) 118 exemplars
The Threads of Magic (2020) 39 exemplars
Monsters: A Reckoning (2021) 36 exemplars
The river and the book (2015) 29 exemplars
The Friendship (2012) 18 exemplars
Theatre (Salt Modern Poets) (2008) 11 exemplars
The Books of Pellinor: #1-4 (2006) 10 exemplars
Navigatio (1996) 8 exemplars
The Island 6 exemplars
This is the stone (1991) 6 exemplars
The blue gate (1997) 6 exemplars
Common Flesh (UK Poetry) (2005) 3 exemplars
Ash (2006) 3 exemplars
El cuervo (1900) 1 exemplars
Remembered Presences (2018) 1 exemplars
Pinkers (Newport City, #2) (2020) 1 exemplars
Jimmy Wonderspoon 1 exemplars

Obres associades

The Book That Made Me (2016) — Col·laborador — 72 exemplars
The World of the Golden Compass: The Otherworldly Ride Continues (2007) — Col·laborador — 65 exemplars

Etiquetat

Coneixement comú

Data de naixement
1962
Gènere
female
Nacionalitat
Australia
Lloc de naixement
Transvaal Province, South Africa
Llocs de residència
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Professions
novelist
playwright
librettist
poet

Membres

Converses

Fiction, Magic -please help a Name that Book (febrer 2017)
Fantasy Witch Book Series??? a Name that Book (març 2016)

Ressenyes

My son and I both enjoyed this book. It dragged for us through at least the first half but by the end, we were involved and interested and debating on getting the second one.
 
Marcat
amcheri | Hi ha 52 ressenyes més | Jan 5, 2023 |
The Books of Pellinor are a high fantasy series that is a more accessible version of Tolkein's Lord of the Rings with the same richness of imagery and world building but with straightforward names and a less complicated history. That said it could also be that The Books of Pellinor are less intimidating because they're not as famous or as widely read as Tolkein.

The Books of Pellinor are set in the land of Edil-Amarandh - a land which has been on the precipe of danger for years - ever since Sharma, the Nameless One stole the Treesong from the Elementals (Elidhu) and broke the song. Cadvan of Lirigon is working against the dark but there's only so much he can do - until while on a mission he runs into Maerad - a slave girl who can see through his invisibility. Soon they're travelling together and finding that all is not right in the land. Then Maerad leads Cadvan to a boy named Hem and nothing is the same. Maerad and Hem have an instant connection and it's not long before Cadvan realises nothing happens without a reason and that only by working together can the light prevail.

The final book begins after the end of The Riddle and The Crow and alternates between Maerad and Hem's viewpoint until they meet up again. I think this was part of the reason I didn't like it quite as much as the others. Although it wasn't split chapter by chapter, but a few chapters by a few, it still had the problem of jolting me out of the story each time the viewpoint changed. And after having Hem's point of view for the last book I just kept wanting him back. But it still is a really great book and I enjoyed the last addition to the series.

I really enjoyed Hem's debut as a player onstage. LMFAO. He begs and begs for the chance and hates it so much. Poor Hem. He never would've guessed to have stage fright. But it made for some pretty amusing moments. I liked Hekibel and the relationship she develops with Saliman. It was nice that he found someone to love. Irc was still hilarious.

Irc continued to live with Hem, and enjoyed as much honor as the other heroes of the Naraudh Lar-Chanë. He clearly never became modest: the phrase Irc-tongue passed into Turbanskian speech as a byword for boastfulness. He died at the ripe old age of twenty-eight, and it was popularly held that when he died, his soul flew to join the Elidhu Nyanar in his land near the Glandugir Hills.

Croggon, Alison. The Singing: The Fourth Book of Pellinor (Pellinor Series 4) (p. 459). Candlewick Press. Kindle Edition.


And I loved that Cadvan gave him the nickname of the Savior of Lirigon. Lol.
I was really sad that Hem sees Zelika and she barely acknowledges him. It would've be nice for him to get the same peace that Maerad does when the dead appear. Cadvan still drove me nuts in this one. Even knowing how Maerad struggled with her thoughts and inner darkness in The Riddle, he still refused to speak up about his thoughts and feelings and it drove me mad. Especially since he should know better. Maerad was better, but still somewhat childish in this book as well. She could've said what was on her mind, but it was more understandable coming from her than it was Cadvan. Even when he said he trusted her, he never really seemed to back it up. Honestly I didn't really get their relationship but they seemed happy enough so *shrugs* I loved the relationship between Hem and Maerad though. Him telling her that he's not afraid, that he just sees her, his sister was sweet. And I was really glad to see a happy ending for everyone. It's always better when they live happily ever after.

Overall it was a strong end to a fantastic fantasy series. One I'm sorry to have reached the end of. 5 stars.
… (més)
 
Marcat
funstm | Hi ha 20 ressenyes més | Dec 30, 2022 |
The Books of Pellinor are a high fantasy series that is a more accessible version of Tolkein's Lord of the Rings with the same richness of imagery and world building but with straightforward names and a less complicated history. That said it could also be that The Books of Pellinor are less intimidating because they're not as famous or as widely read as Tolkein.

The Books of Pellinor are set in the land of Edil-Amarandh - a land which has been on the precipe of danger for years - ever since Sharma, the Nameless One stole the Treesong from the Elementals (Elidhu) and broke the song. Cadvan of Lirigon is working against the dark but there's only so much he can do - until while on a mission he runs into Maerad - a slave girl who can see through his invisibility. Soon they're travelling together and finding that all is not right in the land. Then Maerad leads Cadvan to a boy named Hem and nothing is the same. Maerad and Hem have an instant connection and it's not long before Cadvan realises nothing happens without a reason and that only by working together can the light prevail.

Like the second book in the series, the third book picks up after the group flees Norloch but this time focusing on Hem and Saliman and their journey to Turbansk in the south. This novel runs concurrently to The Riddle. I had great expectations for this book because the first two of the series were absolutely brilliant. And it delivered.

This book may actually be my favourite of the series. I like Maerad but Hem is my favourite character and an entire book about him is perfection. I liked how he came to find his passion for healing and his talent for spying. And I adored the relationship between him and Saliman - I loved that he found he could love and trust and rely on Saliman to look after him and protect him and just be there for him. And IRC!!! I loved Irc the Crow and his thieving ways.

Only Irc seemed untouched by the rising despair that pervaded Turbansk. He told Hem, with a hoarse chuckle, that it was a good time for him: he was building an impressive collection of shiny spoons, buttons, and other treasures filched from the palace, which he had hidden somewhere under the eaves of the roof.

Croggon, Alison. The Crow: The Third Book of Pellinor (Pellinor Series 3) (p. 147). Candlewick Press. Kindle Edition.
And I adored how Hem outwitted him.

Irc could count, but only up to five (a useful disability for Hem, who regularly emptied Irc’s treasure troves — as long as he left five objects, the crow didn’t notice anything was missing).

Croggon, Alison. The Crow: The Third Book of Pellinor (Pellinor Series 3) (p. 177). Candlewick Press. Kindle Edition.


Zelinka was fiery and I loved the friendship between her and Hem. And my heart broke for Hem when he found out she died. Poor Hem. It was a brutal blow. And it sucked - he loved her - he was going to marry her. Especially since he went all that way and she was dead before he even entered the compound. I was heartbroken by it. I really liked Zelika and I would've liked to see them make a go of it afterwards. I'm glad Saliman was there for Hem when he found out. Hared was a total badass and I would've loved to see the meeting between him and Hem after he'd disobeyed all his orders but returned with all the intel. I've got the feeling it would've been impressive.

531 pages and it felt way too short. It was fantastic and I adored every minute. 5 stars.
… (més)
 
Marcat
funstm | Hi ha 17 ressenyes més | Dec 30, 2022 |

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Premis

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Autors associats

Estadístiques

Obres
30
També de
2
Membres
6,548
Popularitat
#3,749
Valoració
4.0
Ressenyes
146
ISBN
198
Llengües
3
Preferit
25

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