Imatge de l'autor

Kitty Kelley

Autor/a de The Royals

22+ obres 3,049 Membres 48 Ressenyes

Sobre l'autor

Kitty Kelley attended the University of Arizona and the University of Washington. Kelley was a VIP hostess at the 1965 World's Fair, worked in Senator Eugene McCarthy's office in Washington, D.C. and was an editorial researcher at the Washington Post. Her claim to fame was Jackie Oh!, the tell-all mostra'n més biography of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Many other smut-filled scandalous biographies followed, including those of Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor, and Nancy Reagan. She also authored The Royals, which was published during the same time as the Princess Diana tragedy. (Bowker Author Biography) mostra'n menys

Inclou aquests noms: Kitty Kelly, Kitty Kelly, Kitty Kelley

Obres de Kitty Kelley

Obres associades

Daughter of Mystery (2014) — Narrador, algunes edicions159 exemplars
The Secret of the Lost Pearls (2022) — Narrador, algunes edicions36 exemplars

Etiquetat

Coneixement comú

Data de naixement
1942-04-04
Gènere
female
Nacionalitat
USA
Llocs de residència
Spokane, Washington, USA
Washington, D.C., USA
Educació
University of Washington
Professions
investigative journalist

Membres

Ressenyes

It feels a little un-American, given that the whole reason the USA is a thing was rebelling against the crown, but I love the British monarchy. If someone wore Saint Edward's Crown, I want to know about them. The jewels, the castles, and the wide variety of people who have worn them/lived in them through the centuries is something I just can't tear myself away from. The family currently occupying the throne are the Windsors, and Kitty Kelley's The Royals recounts their modern history. She starts with the changing of their name from Saxe-Coburg and Gotha to Windsor to downplay their Germanic origin in the World War I era, and traces the family through the divorces of Prince Charles and Prince Andrew (the book was originally published in the late 90s, shortly before the death of Diana, and while there is a bit of content added on to the later edition I had, the bulk of the material stops there). After some introductory material about the history of the House, she recounts it primarily by tracing the romances that have defined it: David and Wallis Simpson, Albert and Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, Elizabeth and Phillip, Margaret and Antony Armstrong-Jones, Charles and Diana, and Andrew and Fergie.

Kelley's book lies somewhere between the tawdriness of an expose and glossiness of an official biography...she's looking to tell a behind-the-scenes story to get to who the Windsors actually are, but mostly avoids being sensationalistic. Kelley highlights the steely reserve of the Queen Mother, who held on to her grudge against Wallis Simpson until the day the latter died, and how her deep opposition to divorce was internalized by her daughter and trapped many of the family members in marriages long past their expiration date (and prevented one marriage from occurring at all, in Margaret's case). Queen Elizabeth II is shown to be both deeply devoted to her duty as monarch, and also as a woman who's fundamentally introverted and struggles with social relationships, including parenthood. And while Phillip hasn't always been faithful to his wife, he has always been loyal to The Firm, as he calls the royal family.

This is actually what interested me the most as I was reading the book...the line that the Windsors walk between being a family, with all the messiness that entails, and being an institution, which needs to show staying power and continue to have meaning in order to maintain relevance. The Queen can never just be a daughter, or sister, or mother, or wife...she is always the monarch and the figurehead of the Commonwealth. For some, like Princess Anne, who has famously inherited her father's stubborn prickliness, this seems to have worked out just fine. But for Prince Charles, with his almost painful earnestness, it's clear that a more traditionally middle-class/warmer household would have been better for him...I found myself feeling more sympathy for him than I would have expected after reading this book. He's not either of his parents' favorite (Phillip prefers Anne, while Elizabeth reportedly favors Andrew), and his obvious desire to be feel loved and be taken seriously is sad. Kelley doesn't let him off the hook for the issues in his marriage to Diana (nor does she let Diana off the hook for her own contributions to the breakdown), but reading about his obvious lasting devotion to Camilla made me glad for him that they finally ended up married.

Like I said previously, I think Kitty Kelley does a pretty good job of including enough gossip to be dishy, but not going overboard and just printing every rumor she heard while doing research. Obviously the Windsors themselves may disagree, but she definitely paints portraits of them as people who are neither flawless example of nobility nor cartoon villains (well, later-in-life Margaret veers towards cartoon villainy but it doesn't seem gratuitous, at any rate). At the end of the day, I found myself glad that the families I was both born into and married into are warm and loving and free from public scrutiny, even if that scrutiny does come with the castles and the jewels and all that. This book is sure to entertain those who enjoy reading about the British royal family, but won't have much for those who aren't already disposed to be interested. It's long, but never feels like a slog.
… (més)
 
Marcat
ghneumann | Hi ha 11 ressenyes més | Jun 14, 2024 |
 
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BooksInMirror | Hi ha 11 ressenyes més | Feb 19, 2024 |
Pretty trashy. I would not bother.
½
 
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Thebeautifulsea | Aug 6, 2022 |
A consummate photojournalist, Stanley Tretick was sent by United Press International to follow the Kennedy campaign of 1960. The photographer soon befriended the candidate and took many of JFK's best pictures during this time. When Kennedy took office, Tretick was given extensive access to the White House, and the picture magazine Look hired him to cover the president and his family. Tretick is best known today for the photographs he took of President Kennedy relaxing with his children. His photographs helped define the American family of the early sixties and lent Kennedy an endearing credibility that greatly contributed to his popularity.
Accompanied by an insightful, heartwarming essay from Kitty Kelley―Tretick's close friend―about the relationship between the photographer and JFK, Capturing Camelot includes some of the most memorable images of America's Camelot and brings to life the uniquely hopeful historical era from which it emerged.
… (més)
 
Marcat
Gmomaj | Hi ha 2 ressenyes més | Jul 18, 2022 |

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Premis

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Autors associats

Stanley Tretick Photographer

Estadístiques

Obres
22
També de
2
Membres
3,049
Popularitat
#8,376
Valoració
½ 3.4
Ressenyes
48
ISBN
151
Llengües
17

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