Canadian Fiction: What's good?

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Canadian Fiction: What's good?

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1LynnB
maig 5, 2007, 9:38am

Actually, I love Canadian fiction. I just finished two novels: Three Day Road by Jospeh Boyden which is an excellent story about two aboriginal men who join the Canadian army in WWI. And, Rare Birds by Edward Riche. Light, funny reading.

I'm taking my reading offshore now with The Inheritance of Loss but I"ll be back!!

2charlenemartel
Editat: maig 12, 2007, 8:39am

I am reading a great deal of Canadian fiction lately. My blog has a ton of suggestions. My most recent read was Homeland by Paul William Roberts which was simply brilliant.

Published by Key Porter Books

The year is 2050 and life as we know it no longer exists. The media is tightly controlled, the identity of the President and the Administration are withheld as a security measure and war is rampant everywhere. People are led like sheep and in the newer generations the concepts of thought, freedom and consent simply don't exist.

David Leverett is 100 years old this year. He has been a government advisor for the longest time and he has watched the changes in the system between former President Carter and current President Bush. What he has learned along the way will shock the reader as much as it shocks David himself.

We first meet David as a young boy and we get to follow along as he finds his way in life. His life changes when he receives an invitation to join a secret society while in University. An invitation that will bring him many great opportunities in life along with a lot of pain and disappointment. What follows from there is a gripping tale of corruption, lies, plots and so much more that will leave you reeling and will certainly make sure you look at things a great deal differently.

The book has it's occassional dry moments, for me at least, but they are rare and I still came away from this book having totally loved it. It made my Everyone Must Read list. I found I had to keep reminding myself that this was in fact a work of fiction. The author has a very skillful way of weaving fact and fiction together that leaves the reader constantly wondering which is which. Indeed, the first thing I did when I closed the book upon finishing it, was to dash to my laptop and check some of the info.

I think what had the most impact was that like One Nation Under God by Vincent M. Wales, this is a work of fiction that can very easily become reality if people don't wake up and start paying attention. Looking around the internet at times and knowing the vast number of conspiracy theories out there, it's even possible some of it did happen. I think that adds a little something to this brilliant and controversial novel.

I haven't read anything else by this author but I am aware he has written a great deal including bestseller A War Against Truth. I do hope to review more of his titles in this blog in the near future. Homeland is definitely a book that deserves a space on any bookcase.


Other notable choices lately are


Out of Character by Vanessa Craft
http://theliteraryword.blogspot.com/2007/04/out-of-character-by-vanessa-craft.ht...


Section K by Timothy Carter (really funny quick read)
http://theliteraryword.blogspot.com/2007/05/section-k-by-timothy-carter.html


Orphan Love by Nadia Bozak (contains strong language)
http://theliteraryword.blogspot.com/2007/05/orphan-love-by-nadia-bozak.html


Stuck in Downward Dog by Chantel Simmons
http://theliteraryword.blogspot.com/2007/04/stuck-in-downward-dog-by-chantel.htm...


As If by Accident by Julie Johnston
http://theliteraryword.blogspot.com/2007/04/as-if-by-accident-by-julie-johnston....


The Walking Boy by Lydia Kwa
http://theliteraryword.blogspot.com/2007/05/walking-boy-by-lydia-kwa.html


and many more can be found on the blog
I review mostly canadian works.

I really must look up the two titles you have mentioned :)

3alans
juny 16, 2008, 9:43am

I've started to read The Russlanderlast night by
Sandra Birdsell. I'm too early in the book to judge it so far, but the beginning has been weak and I'm waiting to see if anything of greater interest happens.
The novel is about a Mennonite community in Russia
at around the time of the Russian Revolution.

4nursejane
març 6, 2009, 11:23am

Thanks to both of you for the title suggestions. I'm very into Canadian Lit, but these are titles I haven't come across before...

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