Which do you prefer? Male or female writers?

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Which do you prefer? Male or female writers?

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1SqueakyChu
Editat: ag. 24, 2006, 8:40 am

Do you see much difference in the writing styles between men and women?

If you prefer mostly one gender of writer, which authors do you read that are of the opposite gender? Why do you think that is?

What do you think of authors who put themselves in the opposite gender when writing a book (e.g. Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden, She's Come Undone by Wally Lamb?

2k00kaburra
ag. 24, 2006, 12:38 pm

While there is often a definite masculine or feminine hand in a book, I don't think it's ever influenced me enough that I shied away from one gender or another. I've never noticed a preference for one sex or the other in my author choices.

3SqueakyChu
ag. 24, 2006, 7:45 pm

I'm up for reading anything usully, but I have noticed that most of the books I like best are by men.

I'm trying to identify why. Are there any generalizations that can be made about how females write versus how men write? I know that's kind of presumptuous of me, but so what? Jump right in if you have an opinion!

4marcinyc
ag. 24, 2006, 9:11 pm

I have no preference, but it seems I read mostly books by women (with female characters). Not sure what that says about me. I think I'm more inclined to read a book with a female protagonist rather than choose a book based on the gender of its author.

5SqueakyChu
ag. 24, 2006, 9:48 pm

For some reason, I like the male sense of humor better (again...may be a gross generalization...take it with a grain of salt). Men tend to be a bit more subtle or a bit drier in their humor. I'm thinking of authors I love like Pat Conroy, Stephen King, Jonathan Safran Foer, or John Irving. They make me laugh, but it's not always a laugh of humor. Sometimes it's a laugh of discomfort. Anyone know what I'm talking about?

6Stuff-Nonsense
Editat: ag. 31, 2006, 10:57 am

I like books by women and about women - I think it began after stumbling into a Women's Studies class in my 20s. I hadn't realized how thirsty I was to see my gender's point of view included on the page (to say nothing of being in a university reading list!). Even 20 years later, the books I enjoy most say something about what it's like to be female. Some examples - Good Grief by Lolly Winston, Animal Dreams by Barbara Kingsolver, Sassafrass, Cypress and Indigo by Ntozake Shange, The Marriages Between Zones Three, Four and Five by Doris Lessing and A Complicated Kindness by Miriam Toews.

I don't think I can generalize about the writing styles of women/ men, but I certainly think that for centuries women were not given as many opportunities to be published (see A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf for a great essay on this topic), and that we are finally in an age where readers can access a wide variety of printed works by women. My response is to gobble up as many good ones as I can!

7Jenson_AKA_DL
set. 18, 2006, 11:24 am

I don't really read many works by men but that doesn't mean I have anything against male writers. I read whatever looks interesting to me at the moment. One of the more interesting books I've read lately was Peeps by Scott Westerfeld but, I do have to admit that all my favorite books have been written by female writers.

8DeusExLibris
nov. 10, 2006, 5:17 pm

The author's gender is a non-issue for me. I go by whether I like the book or not and don't really care whether the writer is a man or woman.

9dizzi
nov. 10, 2006, 10:54 pm

There are so many qualities in making a writer, gender being merely one. Although there are, I'm sure critical differences, it would be incredibly difficult to say whether these differences are a result of gender issues or because of personal stylistic differences. I agree to the fact that most of my favorite writers are male but couldn't that also be because generally speaking, men have had more chances to write and be published throughout history than woman have? Meaning, more male writers than female ones?

10dizzi
nov. 10, 2006, 10:54 pm

There are so many qualities in making a writer, gender being merely one. Although there are, I'm sure critical differences, it would be incredibly difficult to say whether these differences are a result of gender issues or because of personal stylistic differences. I agree to the fact that most of my favorite writers are male but couldn't that also be because generally speaking, men have had more chances to write and be published throughout history than woman have? Meaning, more male writers than female ones?

11imaginelove
nov. 10, 2006, 11:14 pm

I believe men and women have different talents - I like men's drama, action & adventure, and horror books better, while I like women's thriller & suspense and romance books better. I always wondered why I hated Sidney Sheldon even after reading nearly all "her" novels, but then I found out "she" was a MAN! I hate to be sexist, but I cannot separate the two in my mind.

In my mind, David Baldacci, Richard North Patterson, Michael Palmer, Christopher Pike, Michael Romkey, and John Grisham get to be compared to each other. However, they cannot be compared to my favorite female authors such as Diana Gabaldon, Tami Hoag, Kay Hooper, Iris Johansen, and Catherine Coulter. The things I love them for are so vastly different that I cannot even put them in the same categories. :)

12SqueakyChu
nov. 10, 2006, 11:59 pm

--> 9
I agree to the fact that most of my favorite writers are male but couldn't that also be because generally speaking, men have had more chances to write and be published throughout history than woman have? Meaning, more male writers than female ones?

I most prefer writing by male authors and cannot ascribe the reason that you state to my preference because I mostly like to read contemporary novels. I think that nowadays there are as likely to be the same number of male and female authors.

13woollymammoth
nov. 21, 2006, 8:09 am

In a certain bookshop in Hay on Wye the Science Fiction has a subsection entitled 'lady authors'.

Oddly enough Urslua Le Guin isn't in that subsection.

There are sub genres that are all male or all female, Action and Chick lit for a start.

14bookwormteri Primer missatge
nov. 30, 2006, 3:02 pm

I have just recently noticed that I read more books with a female protagonist than male. But it doesn't matter to me if it was written by a man or a woman, although I think more women write about women than men.