American Author Challenge 2015

Converses75 Books Challenge for 2015

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American Author Challenge 2015

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1msf59
Editat: des. 27, 2015, 7:47am





^Carson McCullers, Sinclair Lewis, Ursula K. Le Guin, Ray Bradbury, Barbara Kingsolver

Carson McCullers- January: http://www.librarything.com/topic/185171#
Henry James- February: http://www.librarything.com/topic/187114
Richard Ford- March: http://www.librarything.com/topic/188271
Louise Erdrich- April: http://www.librarything.com/topic/189382#
Sinclair Lewis- May http://www.librarything.com/topic/190597#
Wallace Stegner- June http://www.librarything.com/topic/191545#
Ursula K. Le Guin - July http://www.librarything.com/topic/192700
Larry McMurtry- August http://www.librarything.com/topic/193963#5230599
Flannery O' Connor- September http://www.librarything.com/topic/194950#5254279
Ray Bradbury- October http://www.librarything.com/topic/196214#
Barbara Kingsolver- November http://www.librarything.com/topic/201876
E.L. Doctorow- December

**Kent Haruf- Memorial: http://www.librarything.com/topic/191598#

**Very simple. Pick a book by that author, hopefully something off the shelf, (that is always the mission folks!) and read it. Easy, peasy. If you want to list your picks here, go right ahead. If one of these authors revolts you, substitute a different American author. Of course, there will be "The Purists" and these people will be held in high regard. The Book Gods will smile down upon each and every one.

^^I will post the links to each author AAC, next to the author's name for easy access.

2msf59
Editat: des. 29, 2014, 8:03pm

Well, back by popular demand. I am still amazed and humbled by the wide participation and how dedicated everyone was. Let's see if we can make it happen again. If there is anything I can do to make this smoother and easier, please chime in. I try to get the new author link up a week or so, earlier, but sometimes time slips away from me. My nose may be in a book, for crying out loud.

Mark's Picks:

January - Carson McCullers - The Ballad of the Sad Cafe
February - Henry James – Washington Square
March - Richard Ford – The Sportswriter and possibly Independence Day, for a reread.
April - Louise Erdrich - The Plague of Doves and possibly The Round House
May - Sinclair Lewis – Babbitt
June - Wallace Stegner - Beyond the Hundredth Meridian
July - Ursula K. Le Guin - The Dispossessed and possibly a re-read of A Wizard of Earthsea
August - Larry McMurtry – Pretty Boy Floyd and I would LOVE to do a reread of Lonesome Dove.
September - Flannery O' Connor - Everything That Rises Must Converge
October - Ray Bradbury - The Golden Apples of the Sun and possibly a second.
November - Barbara Kingsolver - Pigs in Heaven and possibly a NF choice
December - E.L. Doctorow – World's Fair?

Additional thoughts:
I might try squeezing in The Sportswriter earlier in the year. I did read Independence Day 20-plus years ago but I want to read the Bascombe books in order. I see he has a new one coming out too. Whew!

I have read O'Connor's first collection and it was wonderful. Has anyone read this 2nd collection?

I've read many of Doctorow's books but have not read City of God, Waterworks or World's Fair. Anyone have any thoughts on these?

Also, if you have not read Doctorow or Ragtime, I highly recommend selecting that one. It is his master-work.

3Crazymamie
des. 28, 2014, 9:37am

Dropping my star, Mark - thanks for setting this up. Hoping to participate more this year, but I am making no promises. I'll probably still be tainted instead of a purist, but a girl can dream. It could happen.

4msf59
Editat: des. 27, 2015, 8:02am



I received a flood of ideas for AAC 2016 and this is what I decided on:

January- Anne Tyler
February- Richard Russo
March- Jane Smiley
April- Poetry Month
May- Ivan Doig
June- Annie Proulx
July- John Steinbeck
August-Joyce Carol Oates
September- John Irving
October- Michael Chabon
November- Annie Dillard
December- Don DeLillo

Other considerations:

William Styron
Ernest Hemingway
Erskine Caldwell
Zora Neale Hurston
Robert Penn Warren
Alice Walker
Shelby Foote
Philip K Dick
Stewart O'Nan
Jack London
F. Scott Fitzgerald

5Crazymamie
des. 28, 2014, 9:48am

Wow, thanks for that warm welcome, my friend! Here's what I already have on my shelves:

January - Carson McCullers - The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (audio), Reflections of a Golden Eye
February - Henry James-
March - Richard Ford
April - Louise Erdrich-
May - Sinclair Lewis- Main Street, Babbitt
June - Wallace Stegner-
July - Ursula K. Le Guin - The Left Hand of Darkness, Worlds of Exile and Illusion
August - Larry McMurtry- Lonesome Dove
September - Flannery O' Connor- A Good Man is Hard to Find, Everything that Rises Must Converge (audio)
October - Ray Bradbury-The Halloween Tree, The Illustrated Man
November - Barbara Kingsolver- The Bean Trees
December - E.L. Doctorow-

The naked ones I will attempt to cover with whatever the library has available.

6msf59
des. 28, 2014, 10:09am

>5 Crazymamie: I think that is a pretty impressive start. I only have about half the books on shelf, including some on the audio pile, but I did not want to pick only authors I had on the mountain. I wanted the list to be well-rounded.

7kidzdoc
des. 28, 2014, 10:09am

I plan to read these books for AAC 2.0:

January: Carson McCullers, Clock Without Hands
February: Henry James, The Wings of the Dove
March: Richard Ford, Independence Day
April: Louise Erdrich, The Plague of Doves
May: Sinclair Lewis, Arrowsmith
June: Wallace Stegner, Crossing to Safety
July: Ursula Le Guin
August: Larry McMurtry
September: Flannery O'Connor, The Complete Stories
October: Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451
November: Barbara Kingsolver, Flight Behavior
December: E.L. Doctorow, The March

I've read most of the short stories in The Complete Stories, which are included in the Library of America's Flannery O'Connor: Collected Works, so it won't take me long to finish it. I'm nearly done with Collected Works as well, so I may also finish it if I have time.

I'm not very interested in Ursula Le Guin or Larry McMurtry, but I could be persuaded to give one or both of them a try.

8msf59
des. 28, 2014, 10:12am

>7 kidzdoc: That is a great list, Darryl. As far as McMurtry goes, I think all Americans and all other human beings, should read Lonesome Dove, one of the truly great books in modern literature.

9DorsVenabili
des. 28, 2014, 10:41am

Here's my plan:

*January: Carson McCullers - The Ballad of the Sad Cafe
*February: Henry James - Washington Square
*March: Richard Ford - I've decided to skip him. I looked and looked and looked (and looked) and nothing appeals.
*April: Louise Erdrich - The Plague of Doves (I think, but subject to change)
*May: Sinclair Lewis - Kingsblood Royal
*June: Wallace Stegner - Angle of Repose
*July: Ursula K. Le Guin - The Lathe of Heaven
*August: Larry McMurtry - I'm thinking of skipping, but I know everyone will yell at me tell me that I have to read Lonesome Dove, so I might give in. We'll see. :-)
*September: Flannery O' Connor - A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories
*October: Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles
*November: Barbara Kingsolver - Pigs in Heaven
*December: E.L. Doctorow - Ragtime

10msf59
des. 28, 2014, 10:51am

>9 DorsVenabili: That is a fantastic list, Kerri! And we have a few shared reads. Lonesome Dove! Lonesome Dove!

11Ameise1
Editat: oct. 21, 2015, 12:51pm

This was Barbara's AAC 2015 reading

January (Carson McCullers): Die Ballade vom traurigen Café (2015-01-03)
February (Henry James): Daisy Miller (2015-02-03)
March (Richard Ford): Canada (2015-03-25)
April (Louise Erdrich): Shadow Tag (2015-04-03)
May (Sinclair Lewis): Main Street (2015-05-04)
June (Wallace Stegner): All The Little Live Things (2015-06-08)
July: skipped
August (Larry McMurtry): Hollywood: A Third Memoir (2015-08-15)
September (Flannery O'Connor): The Violent Bear It Away (2015-09-27)
October (Ray Bradbury): Quicker Than The Eye (2015-10-09)
November (Barbara Kingsolver): Flight Behaviour (2015-10-19)
December (E.L. Doctorow): Andrew's Brain (2015-10-21)

12nittnut
des. 28, 2014, 4:49pm

Hello everyone! I've been lurking all year and watching all the fun and thought I'd join in for 2015.

Happy to see Henry James and Wallace Stegner here, as well as Flannery O'Connor. I've got some gaps to fill there. Lonesome Dove has long been on my list of must reads as well. Bradbury is a mixed bag for me. Farenheit 451 is one of my all time favorites, but I also remember being creeped out to the max when I was about 10 and read The Veldt at school.

January - Carson McCullers - The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (audio)
February - Henry James- The Wings of the Dove
March - Richard Ford - Canada
April - Louise Erdrich- The Roundhouse
May - Sinclair Lewis- Main Street
June - Wallace Stegner- American Places OTS
July - Ursula K. Le Guin - Lavinia
August - Larry McMurtry- Lonesome Dove OTS
September - Flannery O' Connor- A Good Man is Hard To Find - started but never finished
October - Ray Bradbury- Green Shadows, White Whale
November - Barbara Kingsolver- The Poisonwood Bible - this is a re-read
December - E.L. Doctorow- Ragtime

13Caroline_McElwee
Editat: ag. 29, 2015, 5:26pm

Hopefully I will do better than last year in 2015!

2015

Here's what I am thinking:

January: Carson McCullers Ballad of Sad Café (read) ****1/2
February: Henry James The Bostonians, and maybe A few short stories (half through)
March: Richard Ford Canada its been on the pile a while (ran out of time)
April: Louise Eldridge: Love Medicine (read) *** 1/2
May: Sinclair Lewis: Babbitt (not on the mood for it yet)
June: Wallace Stegner: Remembering Laughter (read) *** (will re-read Angle of Repose next month)
July: Ursula La Guin The Left Hand of Darkness read ****
August: Larry McMurthy Lonesome Dove I started this a year or so ago, was loving it but not quite in the frame of mind for a slow novel, so I'll return to it. (Didn't get to it, but I will)
September: Flannery O'Connor A Circle in the Fire and other Stories (added to Septembers prospects pile)
October: Ray Bradbury Martian Chronicles
November: Barbara Kingsolver Prodigal Summer
December: E L Doctorow Ragtime and maybe some essays

All of the above I own except the Eldridge, and I bought the La Guin when I decided to read it as part of the challenge, so 10 of the books will be off the shelf

Read so far 4 1/2 of 7

14lindapanzo
Editat: des. 27, 2015, 11:36am

My current plans. Subject to change of course.

My list, though still a work in progress...

January: Carson McCullers, The Ballad of the Sad Cafe--FINISHED
February: Henry James, Daisy Miller--FINISHED
March: Richard Ford, The Sportswriter--FINISHED
April: Louise Erdrich, The Master Butcher Singing Club
May: Sinclair Lewis, Main Street
June: Wallace Stegner, Crossing to Safety or The Big Rock Candy Mountain
July: Ursula Le Guin--substitute Anne Tyler
August: Larry McMurtry--The Last Picture Show--FINISHED
September: Flannery O'Connor, substitute Saul Bellow The Adventures of Augie March
October: Ray Bradbury, Dandelion Wine--FINISHED
November: Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible
December: E.L. Doctorow, Ragtime--FINISHED

15EBT1002
Editat: des. 28, 2014, 8:47pm

Aquest missatge ha estat suprimit pel seu autor.

16jolerie
des. 28, 2014, 9:09pm

I am going to *try* to be a purist. Will see by the end of the year. ;)

January: Carson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
Feburary: Henry James - The Portrait of a Lady
March: Richard Ford - Canada
April: Louise Erdich - The Round House
May: Sinclair Lewis - It Can't Happen Here
June: Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety
July: Ursula K. LeGuin - Earth Sea Series
August: Larry McMurtry - Lonesome Dove
September: Flannery O'Connor - Wise Blood
October: Ray Bradbury - Fahrenheit 451
November: Barbara Kingsolver - Pigs in Heaven
December: E.L. Doctorow - The March

17msf59
des. 28, 2014, 10:14pm

Wow! I LOVE all these lists!! And yah, for PURITY!!

>15 EBT1002: What happened, Ellen? Run out of gas?

18katiekrug
Editat: des. 28, 2014, 10:33pm

I plan to maintain my "purist" status in 2015. The only one I really have no clue what to read for, nor any options on the TBR, is LeGuin...

January: Carson McCullers - Member of the Wedding or The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
Feburary: Henry James - Washington Square
March: Richard Ford - Canada
April: Louise Erdich* - The Round House or one of her older novels (I have several on the TBR...)
May: Sinclair Lewis* - Main Street
June: Wallace Stegner* - Crossing to Safety or Angle of Repose
July: Ursula K. LeGuin* - ???
August: Larry McMurtry* - Lonesome Dove
September: Flannery O'Connor - A short story collection or The Violent Bear It Away
October: Ray Bradbury - Fahrenheit 451
November: Barbara Kingsolver - The Bean Trees
December: E.L. Doctorow - Ragtime

ETA: * for new author for me

19EBT1002
Editat: des. 28, 2014, 10:22pm

>17 msf59: I realized that I hand't yet put together my list for the whole year. SO - here goes:

January: Carson McCullers - The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and maybe Clock Without Hands
February: Henry James* - Washington Square
March: Richard Ford* - The Sportswriter
April: Louise Erdrich - reread Tracks?
May: Sinclair Lewis* - Babbitt
June: Wallace Stegner - reread Angle of Repose or Crossing to Safety or both (happy sigh)
July: Ursula K. Le Guin - A Wizard of Earthsea
August: Larry McMurtry - Comanche Moon
September: Flannery O' Connor - still undecided
October: Ray Bradbury - Something Wicked This Way Comes and reread The Martian Chronicles
November: Barbara Kingsolver - Reread The Bean Trees, her first and still my fave.
December: E.L. Doctorow* - Ragtime

*New author for me.

I did not attain purist status for 2014 but I am determined for the coming year. :-)

20kac522
des. 28, 2014, 11:52pm

I plan to participate in this challenge, but somewhat "impurely." One of my main objectives this year is to read my TBRs. On the current list, I have 8 out of the 12 authors sitting on my shelves right now. For the 4 remaining, I will substitute different American authors who are on my TBR shelves. Since I didn't participate last year, I'll add Edith Wharton from last year's challenge. I'll also substitute Saul Bellow for E. L. Doctorow, and add an African-American and a Latina: Alice Walker and Sandra Cisneros. My current picks are:

Jan: McCullers, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
Feb: James, The Ambassadors
Mar: Richard Ford Wharton, The Custom of the Country
Apr: Erdrich, The Plague of Doves
May: Lewis, Babbitt
Jun: Stegner, Joe Hill
Jul: Ursula K. Le Guin Cisneros, Carmelo
Aug: Larry McMurtry Walker, Meridian
Sep: O'Connor, a selection of stories from The Complete Stories
Oct: Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451
Nov: Kingsolver, Prodigal Summer or The Lacuna
Dec: E.L. Doctorow Bellow, The Adventures of Augie March

Several of these titles have been on my shelves for many, many years, so I look forward to the challenge.

21bohemima
des. 29, 2014, 12:20am

Hi, Mark! I'm glad you're running this again. I was only at 66% (I think) for 2014, but will probably wind up at 100% for this year.

My problem is that I read books in the wrong months sometimes! But I hope to get to each author you've listed, since most of them were on my personal "think about" lists for '15.

I'm starting off with Member of the Wedding by McCullers.

22kidzdoc
des. 29, 2014, 8:20am

>20 kac522: I like your idea of substituting books from your TBR pile in place of authors that you're less interested in reading, Kathy. I'll do the same thing, as I don't own anything by Ursula Le Guin or Larry McMurtry, and I'd much rather read something else instead. Since I didn't participate in AAC this year I'll choose two authors from that year to replace Le Guin and McMurtry. So, here's my updated list:

January: Carson McCullers, Clock Without Hands
February: Henry James, The Wings of the Dove
March: Richard Ford, Independence Day
April: Louise Erdrich, The Plague of Doves
May: Sinclair Lewis, Arrowsmith
June: Wallace Stegner, Crossing to Safety
July: Ursula Le Guin William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury
August: Larry McMurtry James Baldwin, Going to Meet the Man
September: Flannery O'Connor, The Complete Stories
October: Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451
November: Barbara Kingsolver, Flight Behavior
December: E.L. Doctorow, The March

23lkernagh
des. 29, 2014, 2:49pm

Thanks for setting the AAC up, Mark! I don't do well with 'planned in advance' reading but I am still looking forward to participating for some of the months. I am looking forward to starting off with Carson McCullers The Heart is a Lonely Hunter.

24Tara1Reads
Editat: des. 19, 2015, 10:11pm

This is my first time doing the AAC. I don't think I can be a purist as there are some writers on the list I am just not interested in, and I am concentrating on reading from my shelf. But I will substitute the writers I am not interested in with writers from the 2014 AAC whose books I have in my TBR pile.

This is my tentative plan:

January: Carson McCullers - Clock Without Hands (OTS) ✔
February: Henry James - What Maisie Knew (Library) ✔
March: *Substituting Mark Twain - I have four options here, but I will go with the first one which is The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. (OTS) Richard Ford - Wildlife and Women With Men
April: Louise Erdrich - The Painted Drum (OTS) (Read in January) ✔
May: Sinclair Lewis - Arrowsmith (OTS)
June: Wallace Stegner - The Big Rock Candy Mountain or Crossing to Safety (Library)
July: *Substituting with Edith Wharton - The House of Mirth (OTS) Ursula K. Le Guin - The Left Hand of Darkness. (Library)
August: Larry McMurtry - Lonesome Dove or Terms of Endearment (OTS) ✔
September: Flannery O'Connor - Undecided. I want to read everything of hers! I'll have to see what I can get from the library. The Violent Bear It Away (OTS)
October: Ray Bradbury - Dandelion Wine or The October Country or Twice Twenty-Two (Library)
November: Barbara Kingsolver - I have many of hers to choose from, but I will probably go with Flight Behavior so I will have something to discuss with other members of the group. (OTS)
December: *Substituting with Philip Roth - I have three options: The Great American Novel, The Facts: A Novelist's Autobiography, or The Ghost Writer. (OTS) E.L. Doctorow - Ragtime or Andrew's Brain (Library)

I hope I don't fail miserably. I have only done one reading challenge before in my life. I wasn't very structured with it and it took me about two years to complete it. All these LT challenges are definitely a first for me!

**OTS does mean "off the shelf," right?

January: Carson McCullers - Clock Without Hands Completed
February: Henry James - What Maisie Knew Completed
March: Richard Ford - Wildlife and Women With Men Completed
April: Louise Erdrich - The Painted Drum Completed in January
May: Sinclair Lewis
June: Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety Completed in September
July: Ursula K. LeGuin
August: Larry McMurtry Terms of Endearment Completed
September: Flannery O'Connor
October: Ray Bradbury
November: Barbara Kingsolver - Flight Behavior Completed in December
December: E.L. Doctorow

25msf59
Editat: des. 29, 2014, 7:06pm

Wow! It looks like this might take off, even better than AACI and that was a rocket!! Yes, I am beaming...

>24 Tara1Reads: Good to see you and welcome a board. I like this challenge, because it is so flexible. You pick the book you want to read, read it when you want and you can substitute if necessary, although The Purists hold a very special place in my heart. Swoons a little...

BTW: My name is Mark!

26PaulCranswick
des. 30, 2014, 2:32am

Mark I am not certain which book I shall read every month but I shall certainly participate every month:

So far:

January : Carson McCullers - Ballad of the Sad Cafe
February : Henry James - TBC
March : Richard Ford - Independence Day
April : Louise Erdrich - The Round House
May : Sinclair Lewis - Arrowsmith
June : Wallace Stegner - Angle of Repose
July : Ursula Le Guin - A Wizard of Earthsea
August : Larry McMurtry - Comanche Moon
September : Flannery O'Connor - Everything that Rises Must Converge
October : Ray Bradbury - TBC
November : Barbara Kingsolver - The Poisonwood Bible
December : E.L. Doctorow - The March

27drachenbraut23
des. 30, 2014, 7:08am

Hello Mark :)

Well, as you know I am not someone to make lists for a whole year ahead (I get to easy distracted and side tracked), but I do have some reading material on most authors.
However, I would appreciate some suggestions on Richard Ford, Wallace Stegner and Larry McMurtry ahem, this last one ah...........they kinda look like Western????

28msf59
des. 30, 2014, 7:24am

Bianca made it! Bianca made it! And she has questions! Yah!

I would recommend The Sportswriter for Ford. I have not read it but it is the first of his Bascombe books, which are highly regarded. On the Stegner: I would suggest Angle of Repose or Crossing to Safety. Both are brilliant.
The McMurtry: Lonesome Dove if you have the time or The Last Picture Show if you are pressed. Lonesome Dove is an American Masterpiece, so keep that in mind. And yes it is a western but do not let that sway you.

29drachenbraut23
des. 30, 2014, 10:16am

> Yes - and "she" has questions *grin* - Thanks for the recommendations Mark! I will see if my sister can get them for me in the library!
LOL - Ok I won't be swayed by a Western and shall I tell you something......when I was about 12 years old my dad used to read this "penny" Westerns. You know this little magazines? Like Lassiter and co? I used to love them when I was a kid.

30thornton37814
des. 30, 2014, 6:38pm

I will likely participate most of the time. I have not decided on books -- not even for January. Most will depend on what is available to me at the library since I would prefer to avoid purchasing books. I need to make the current pile smaller.

31maggie1944
Editat: des. 31, 2014, 4:44pm

I am raising my hand, somewhat tentatively as I did poorly last year, but it is a new year, so what they hey:

Carson McCullers- January will be Member of the Wedding which I have cracked open.
Henry James- February - will be Daisy Miller on my Kindle
Richard Ford- March will be Canada OTS
Louise Erdrich- April will be The Round House OTS
Sinclair Lewis- May TBD
Wallace Stegner- June will be The Big Rock Candy Mountain OTS
Ursula K. Le Guin - July will be Tales from Earthsea on my Kindle
Larry McMurtry- August TBD
Flannery O' Connor- September
Ray Bradbury- October TBD
Barbara Kingsolver- November may be The Poisonwood Bible or Prodigal Summer OTS
E.L. Doctorow- December may be Homer and Langley: A Novel on my Kindle

I still have a few weeks to look through my shelves, eh?

32scaifea
gen. 1, 2015, 9:19am

I'm gonna give this AAC business a go this year - count me in!

January : Carson McCullers - The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter
February : Henry James - The American
March : Richard Ford - Independence Day
April : Louise Erdrich - The Antelope Wife
May : Sinclair Lewis - Arrowsmith
June : Wallace Stegner - Spectator Bird
July : Ursula Le Guin - The Left Hand of Darkness
August : Larry McMurtry - Lonesome Dove
September : Flannery O'Connor - Complete Stories
October : Ray Bradbury - Something Wicked This Way Comes
November : Barbara Kingsolver - The Poisonwood Bible
December : E.L. Doctorow - World's Fair

33ccookie
gen. 1, 2015, 3:50pm

these are my tentative plans for 2015:

Here are my tentative plans:
January - Carson McCullers- The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
February - Henry James - The Portrait of a Lady
March - Richard Ford The Sportswriter
April - Louise Erdrich The Round House
May - Sinclair Lewis - Babitt
June - Wallace Stegner - Angle of Repose
July - Ursula LeGuin - Dispossessed
August - Larry McMurtry - Lonesome Dove
September - Flannery O'Connor - Wise Blood
October - Ray Bradbury - Fahrenheit 451
November - Barbara Kingsolver - The Poisonwood Bible
December - E.L. Doctorow - Ragtime

34LauraBrook
gen. 1, 2015, 5:00pm

I'm in again this year, though last year my participation was barely detectable. I'll post on a month-by-month basis. 2 real-life book clubs take precedence over this one and other LT challenges, unfortunately. :-/

35-Cee-
Editat: març 4, 2015, 9:49pm

I'm in... but like last year may wind up missing a few months.
Here's a feeble attempt at what I might read based on what is on my shelves right now... but then, I do have an Ammy gift cert if I need to buy something else ;-)

Looks like I could use recommendations for the blanks.

January - Carson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter COMPLETED

February - Henry James - Washington Square COMPLETED

March - Richard Ford -

April - Louise Erdrich - The Plague of Doves

May - Sinclair Lewis -

June - Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety

July - Ursula K. Le Guin - A Wizard of Earthsea

August - Larry McMurtry - Lonesome Dove

September - Flannery O' Connor -

October - Ray Bradbury - The Halloween Tree

November - Barbara Kingsolver - The Lacuna

December - E.L. Doctorow - Ragtime

36luvamystery65
gen. 1, 2015, 9:12pm

Mark I plan to participate this year. I will try to be a purist again this year but what I won't be purist about is the timeline. I participated fully in 6 challenges last year and additional group and shared reads. I am taking a break from all the fully scheduled reading. When I get to the author I will post on the thread. I hope that will still warm your heart a little.

37msf59
Editat: gen. 1, 2015, 10:17pm

>35 -Cee-: Glad to see you tagging along, Claudia! If you need any suggestions, just chime in. McCullers will be a very easy one to pick.

>36 luvamystery65: Being a Purist has nothing to do with reading the book during that particular month, as long as you get to it at some point. Many participants have done it that way and I have no problem with it. Go Ro! Go Ro!

38-Cee-
gen. 2, 2015, 10:45am

Thanks, Mark. I just realized I have The Heart is a Lonely Hunter so I'm good for January :)

39katiekrug
gen. 2, 2015, 1:18pm

I just saw that The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. Le Guin is currently $0.99 on Kindle (US).

40kidzdoc
Editat: gen. 2, 2015, 5:20pm

Thanks, Katie! I wasn't planning to read anything by Ursula Le Guin for this challenge, but The Lathe of Heaven sounds interesting, so I've just purchased the Kindle version of it.

41catarina1
gen. 2, 2015, 5:30pm

I'm going to try it this year; last year, it just didn't work out.

January - Carson McCullers - Heart is a Lonely Hunter
February - Henry James - What Maisie Knew
March - Richard Ford - Canada or The Sportswriter
April - Louise Erdrich - I have 5 of hers but it will probably be The Round House
May - Sinclair Lewis - ?
June - Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety or The Spectator Bird
July - Ursula Le Guin - ?
August - Larry McMurtry - Streets of Laredo
September - Flannery O'Connor - A Good Man is Hard to Find
October - Ray Bradbury - Dandelion Wine
November - Barbara Kingslover - I have 6 of hers but probably either The Lacuna or Flight Behavior
December - EL Doctorow - The March

42scaifea
gen. 3, 2015, 6:58am

>39 katiekrug: >40 kidzdoc: Oooh, Lathe of Heaven is a good one! The movie isn't half bad, either.

43bohemima
gen. 3, 2015, 9:11am

>37 msf59: So good to see your comment, Mark! I'm always reading AAC books out of order or when I get to them.

However, A Member of the Wedding is pretty firmly in place for this month. I believe the last time I read it I was around 14...so essentially it's a brand-new book for me!

44streamsong
gen. 3, 2015, 9:25am

>43 bohemima: Love your comment about reading out of order (says she who is still listening to Rabbit Run.

45maggie1944
Editat: gen. 4, 2015, 8:48am

Completed The Member of the Wedding and wrote a short non-review on my thread. You can see it here: http://www.librarything.com/topic/185046#4986196

46msf59
gen. 4, 2015, 8:47am

>44 streamsong: "Love your comment about reading out of order (says she who is still listening to Rabbit Run." LOL. That is why I have no problem with reading the AAC books at any time. Our schedules are widely different and erratic.

>45 maggie1944: Make sure you post your McCuller thoughts on the author thread. You have it starred, right?

47bohemima
gen. 4, 2015, 10:02am

*sulks*

Mark's not talkin' to me!

48msf59
gen. 4, 2015, 10:19am

Sorry, Gail! LOL. I should have included your post, with Janet's, since it was directed at you too. Once again, I have no problem, (nor, should I) about reading an AAC anytime throughout the year. I am just so glad so many people are participating.

49DeltaQueen50
gen. 6, 2015, 7:37pm

Count me in for this Challenge. I probably won't be a "purist" but I certainly plan on reading a number of the authors you have chosen, Mark. Starting in January with The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter.

50msf59
gen. 6, 2015, 8:47pm

Judy is in! Judy is in! Hooray!

51DeltaQueen50
gen. 7, 2015, 12:26am

I'm back and I am going to change which Carson McCullers that I am reading. I think I will go for The Ballad of the Sad Cafe. I thought I had The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter but it turns out that I don't.

52laytonwoman3rd
Editat: feb. 27, 2015, 12:11pm

I was sure I had posted my list on this thread, but I see that I was wrong. Here's what I'm planning for AAC II:

January Carson McCullers -- The Heart is a Lonely Hunter Finished.

February Henry James Finished The Aspern Papers

March Richard Ford -- Canada

April Louise Erdrich -- The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse

May Sinclair Lewis -- Dodsworth

June Wallace Stegner -- Angle of Repose

July Ursula K. Le Guin I may skip her. Further thought is required.

August Larry McMurtry something from the library---I've already read Lonesome Dove and some others.

Sept. Flannery O' Connor As with James, I have everything, it's just a matter of choosing something new to me.

October Ray Bradbury Dandelion Wine

November Barbara Kingsolver -- Flight Behavior

December E.L. Doctorow -- City of God?

54Morphidae
gen. 18, 2015, 12:14pm

I was a purist last year and plan on being one this year.

January: Carson McCullers, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
February: Henry James, Daisy Miller or Washington Square
March: Richard Ford, Wildlife
April: Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine or The Round House
May: Sinclair Lewis, Arrowsmith
June: Wallace Stegner, Angle of Repose
July: Ursula K. Le Guin, Gifts
August: Larry McMurtry, Zeke and Ned (or The Last Picture Show now that it's been recommended)
September: Flannery O' Connor, A Good Man is Hard to Find
October: Ray Bradbury, The Illustrated Man
November: Barbara Kingsolver, The Bean Trees
December: E.L. Doctorow, World's Fair

I had to stretch for Le Guin as I've read most of hers. I've already read Lonesome Dove so had no clue what to read for McMurty.

55msf59
gen. 26, 2015, 7:36pm



The Henry James thread is up. Come on by and let us know what you plan to read:

http://www.librarything.com/topic/187114

56catarina1
gen. 26, 2015, 8:16pm

I had planned to read one of the two that I already had - either What Maisie Knew or The Ambassadors. But I just read the reviews of both and neither one gets great ones. So I decided to go "small" and downloaded the novella Daisy Miller. Just call me chicken!

57msf59
gen. 26, 2015, 8:36pm

CHICKEN!! LOL!

58luvamystery65
gen. 28, 2015, 1:42pm

Here is a link to the group read of Portrait of a Lady in the 2015 Challenge group.

http://www.librarything.com/topic/187185

You don't have to be a member of the group to participate in the group read. Just head over and join in.

59vancouverdeb
gen. 29, 2015, 7:39am

I read more or less what I feel like, but I am 50 % through The Heart is a A Lonely Hunter and wow, what a read! Thanks Mark.

60msf59
gen. 29, 2015, 8:07am

>58 luvamystery65: Thanks, for posting that Ro!!

>59 vancouverdeb: "I read more or less what I feel like..." Meanie!!

61vancouverdeb
gen. 29, 2015, 5:54pm

@60 LOL! Well, this month I did not intend to participate in the BAC or the AAC but I did! But Henry James - I make no promises, Lone Ranger! ;)

62nittnut
gen. 29, 2015, 9:17pm

>61 vancouverdeb: Oh don't be afraid. ;) Henry James is wonderful. I recommend Washington Square. It's not terribly long.

63vancouverdeb
gen. 29, 2015, 10:24pm

62 Jenn! Such a bad influence on me!;) Just purchased a copy of Washington Square. It won't arrive til Tuesday though! :) You and Mark are so convincing! ;)

64vancouverdeb
gen. 29, 2015, 10:25pm

Where's the Canadian Author Challenge? Some one start one! :)

65rosalita
gen. 29, 2015, 10:32pm

Deborah, I would *love* it if someone would start a Canadian Author Challenge! Please, one of you 49-Northers, take that on for 2016.

66msf59
gen. 30, 2015, 9:04am

>64 vancouverdeb: That has been mentioned before, Deb. All it takes is someone to start it up. I would suggest waiting until next year, when the Challenges thin out.

67dallenbaugh
gen. 31, 2015, 4:14pm

This challenge encouraged me to read an author, Carson McCullers, I thought I had read but I hadn't. The Heart is a Lonely Hunter earned 4.5 stars for me. My thoughts at first were that there was a pervading absence of hope in this remarkable book written by 23 year old Carson McCullers. But the truth is there was an abundance of hope in all the main characters, it is just that in this southern town poverty, lack of choices, and misplaced dreams conspired to rob them of their ability to realize their heart's desires.

68EBT1002
gen. 31, 2015, 9:55pm

In the last 24 hours I read the short and wonderful The Member of the Wedding. I was lukewarm in the early reading, but I ended up giving it four stars. The last third was exquisite.

69nittnut
feb. 1, 2015, 2:36am

>63 vancouverdeb: *Chortles in an evil way* But it will be worth it. You'll see. I'm off to buy myself a Kindle version of Wings of the Dove.

70ffortsa
feb. 2, 2015, 10:27am

I failed to get to the McCullers in January, but it's still on loan from the library, so I'll get to it this month. I've read a fair bit of Henry James, and may skip him this time around, as I catch up to my other myriad obligations.

71rosalita
feb. 4, 2015, 4:07pm

>67 dallenbaugh: But the truth is there was an abundance of hope in all the main characters, it is just that in this southern town poverty, lack of choices and misplaced dreams conspired to rob them of their ability to realize their heart's desires.

Oh, that's just perfect! I couldn't agree more.

72rosalita
feb. 4, 2015, 4:09pm

I read The Member of the Wedding and loved it, as i mentioned earlier. I got The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter too late from the library to finish in January, but I polished it off a couple of days ago and I'm glad I went ahead and read it. So many layers and depth; it's astonishing to think it was written by a 23-year-old, even though 23-year-olds in the 1930s were in many ways much older than 21st century 23-year-olds. In my opinion, at least.

73DorsVenabili
feb. 6, 2015, 9:33am

The ebook of The Master Butchers Singing Club by Louise Erdrich is on sale for $3.99.

75vancouverdeb
feb. 10, 2015, 12:08pm

Very much enjoying Washington Square , though I am not yet finished it.

76msf59
Editat: feb. 24, 2015, 7:37pm



^The Richard Ford American Author Thread is up: http://www.librarything.com/topic/188271

77cbl_tn
feb. 24, 2015, 7:40pm

Is this where I confess that I will not be a purist for this challenge? I will be reading Stephen Crane in March. I have the audio of The Red Badge of Courage to listen to instead.

78msf59
feb. 24, 2015, 7:49pm

What??

Kidding, of course. Stephen Crane is a good choice.

79-Cee-
feb. 26, 2015, 10:46am

Hi Mark!
I am actually trying to keep up with the AAC group and enjoying it even though I am not much of a visible presence. So now I have to think about my March selection. I have never read Ford. Looking forward to it and hope I pick a good one. Any suggestions?

80bohemima
feb. 26, 2015, 10:53am

Mark, even though my personal challenge this year is to not take on any challenges, I'm reading the threads with much interest. I think Ford is the only author on the AAC2 that I haven't read, but I do have one of his on the kindle.

Other readers' opinions and ideas often inspire me to widen my boundaries and/or look at books I've already read in new ways. So thanks for all your organizing work!

81LoisB
Editat: jul. 22, 2015, 8:38pm

Apparently, I never posted my list here!

January - Carson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
February - Henry James - Daisy Miller
March - Richard Ford - Canada
April - Louise Erdrich - Love Medicine
May - Sinclair Lewis - Babbitt
June - Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety
July - Ursula LeGuin - The Dispossessed
August - Larry McMurtry - The Last Picture Show: A Novel
September - Flannery O'Connor - Wise Blood: A Novel
October - Ray Bradbury - The Halloween Tree
November - Barbara Kingsolver - The Bean Trees: A Novel
December - E.L. Doctorow - Ragtime: A Novel

82msf59
feb. 27, 2015, 6:57pm



Happy Birthday, John Steinbeck!

My favorite writer was born in 1902. What a literary legacy! If we have an AACIII, Mr. Steinbeck will definitely be on that one.

83jolerie
feb. 27, 2015, 6:58pm

Not IF....you mean WHEN. ;)

84Tara1Reads
feb. 27, 2015, 6:59pm

Happy Birthday, John! He is one of my favorites too!

85Caroline_McElwee
feb. 27, 2015, 7:03pm

Happy birthday JS. Would be good to have him on next year's list. He's a favourite old friend.

I'm well into The Bostonians, though may not have it finished til next week.

It's a while since I read Ford, but Canada it will be next month.

86msf59
feb. 27, 2015, 7:23pm

>83 jolerie: "Not IF....you mean WHEN." LOL! You got me there, Valerie!

We had a year-long Steinbeckathon going, about 2 years ago, which was amazing, (thank you, Ilana!!) and it also inspired me to launch the American Author Challenge. This is the only reason, why Mr. Steinbeck has not be included in the first 2 Challenges. I wanted to give a few different authors a shot, but watch out for next year.

87jll1976
març 5, 2015, 5:15pm

Hi everyone! For anyone looking ahead to July, and deciding which Ursula Le Guin novel to read- check out Electric Lit. There is a link to the chance to purchase an ebook version of The Lathe of Heaven for $5.40.

88msf59
març 5, 2015, 10:28pm

>87 jll1976: Thanks, Jacqui! Always appreciated.

89luvamystery65
març 19, 2015, 10:29pm

What Val said in >83 jolerie:!

You know I've said on other threads what a brilliant idea this was Mark. Thank you for doing this and the excitement that you bring to it. I am reading authors I would never have even thought possible.

90laytonwoman3rd
març 21, 2015, 9:19am

Of general interest to American literature lovers: Unpublished Tennessee Williams story to appear in Strand Magazine.

91lindapanzo
març 21, 2015, 12:28pm

Oops, after Louise Erdrich, I thought Wallace Stegner was up next but I was mistaken.

I may make it a June/July Wallace Stegner-athon. I've got so many of his that I want to read.

93msf59
Editat: març 26, 2015, 7:43pm

94Morphidae
abr. 1, 2015, 10:09pm

>92 laytonwoman3rd: Oh dear. More mistaken gender for me. I thought Flannery was male.

95laytonwoman3rd
abr. 2, 2015, 12:04pm

I think a lot of people have that issue with both Carson McCullers and Flannery O'Connor. What were their parents thinking, eh?

96Crazymamie
abr. 2, 2015, 1:02pm

Actually, their parents were thinking that they had named them Mary and Lulu - both girls chose to go by their middle names when they were teenagers.

97laytonwoman3rd
abr. 2, 2015, 4:07pm

>96 Crazymamie: And I should have known that...I'm sure I DID know that once, back in the days before I lost my mind.

98Crazymamie
abr. 2, 2015, 4:51pm

Ha! I'm right there with you.

I only learned it within the last few years, as I have been trying to learn more about Georgia authors - we just moved to Georgia in 2012.

99LoisB
Editat: abr. 10, 2015, 10:35pm

April Update

January - Carson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter DONE
February - Henry James - Daisy Miller DONE
March - Richard Ford - Canada DONE
April - Louise Erdrich - Love Medicine DONE
May - Sinclair Lewis - Arrowsmith
June - Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety
July - Ursula LeGuin - The Dispossessed
August - Larry McMurtry - The Last Picture Show: A Novel
September - Flannery O'Connor - Wise Blood: A Novel
October - Ray Bradbury - The Halloween Tree
November - Barbara Kingsolver - The Bean Trees: A Novel
December - E.L. Doctorow - Ragtime: A Novel

100EBT1002
abr. 11, 2015, 3:30pm

I finished Love Medicine the morning. 4.5 stars. Beautiful. Wonderful. Funny. Heartbreaking. Unsentimental.

I will definitely read The Beet Queen and Tracks soon.

101laytonwoman3rd
abr. 12, 2015, 11:56am

I'm leaving Louise Erdrich for a while, and reading Mary Doria Russell's Doc, which is a faster, more gripping (that is not to say "better") read, and suits my mood at the moment.

I was sorry to learn that Ivan Doig passed away last week, but grateful that I now know the proper way to pronounce his name. In better news, Jeffrey Lent has a new book coming out soon, and it will return us to the post-Civil War world he handled so remarkably in In the Fall.

102EBT1002
abr. 12, 2015, 8:47pm

>101 laytonwoman3rd: Doc is a wonderful read. Enjoy!

I was also sad about Ivan Doig's passing. I wonder if we might do an Ivan Doig memorial read next month. Or perhaps save him for the AAC-III. :-)

103banjo123
abr. 13, 2015, 2:16pm

Ivan Doig has long been on my to-read list, so I would be up for a memorial read, either sooner or later.

104msf59
abr. 13, 2015, 7:13pm

I might have to consider starting a list for next year's AAC. The authors are beginning to pile up. LOL.

Maybe, I'll start it, in post #4 up there. Remind me, if I forget.

105maggie1944
abr. 16, 2015, 9:47am

I think I may start reading The Round House by Louise Erdrich this morning. I have such a lovely copy which I found as a used book. Hard cover and deckled edges! Perfect condition.

I have other books started, and waiting for my return, but this book is calling my name.

106msf59
abr. 29, 2015, 8:43pm



^The Sinclair Lewis AAC thread is up: http://www.librarything.com/topic/190597#

Stop by, drop a star and let us know which book you will be reading.

107mhmr
maig 16, 2015, 10:58am

I have gotten a terribly late start on the AAC this year but we had a tragic death in our family that slowed me down considerably.

I am reading what I can find at the library first, so have read Louise Erdrich's first novel, Love Medicine and now have started The Wings of the Dove, Henry James. I'll have to order the others through library interloan soon.

Determined to catch up with all y'll.

Mel

108msf59
maig 16, 2015, 11:40am

Thanks for checking in Mel. We missed you. Sorry to hear about your loss.
Glad to see you jumping back in to the AAC.

109lindapanzo
maig 16, 2015, 9:37pm

Not doing very well again in May, my second straight poor AAC month but I am really looking forward to Wallace Stegner in June.

110Caroline_McElwee
maig 22, 2015, 5:07pm

>109 lindapanzo: he won't disappoint Linda.

111LoisB
maig 24, 2015, 1:45pm

May Update
January - Carson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
February - Henry James - Daisy Miller
March - Richard Ford - Canada
April - Louise Erdrich - Love Medicine
May - Sinclair Lewis - Babbitt
June - Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety
July - Ursula LeGuin - The Dispossessed
August - Larry McMurtry - The Last Picture Show: A Novel
September - Flannery O'Connor - Wise Blood: A Novel
October - Ray Bradbury - The Halloween Tree
November - Barbara Kingsolver - The Bean Trees: A Novel
December - E.L. Doctorow - Ragtime: A Novel

112Tess_W
maig 25, 2015, 1:46pm

Since I didn't join until today, I will begin my American author challenge in June:
June-Wallace Stegner-The Spectator Bird
July-Ursula LeGuin-I HATE sci fi--so going to cheat a bit and just read a Kindle Single: The Daughter of Odren
August-Larry McMurty--not sure, either The Last Picture Show or Lonesome Dove, have always wanted to read both
September-The Violent Bear It Away: A Novel
October-The Martian Chronicles
November-Barbara Kingslover-The Poisonwood Bible
December-E.L. Doctorow-Not sure....The Book of Daniel???? Ragtime?????

113msf59
maig 27, 2015, 10:18pm

Kent Haruf passed away, last November and we talked about adding him to the AAC this year, as a special guest. Does anyone remember if we decided on a certain month?

I think July or September would work. Thoughts?

114msf59
maig 27, 2015, 10:20pm

>112 Tess_W: Welcome to the AAC, Tess. Nice to have you join us. I LOVE your McMurtry choices.

115nittnut
maig 28, 2015, 1:20am

i am loving this ACC. I am really looking forward to reading more Stegner. He is one of my favorite American authors.

Here's how it's going for me:

January - Carson McCullers - The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (audio) - COMPLETE
February - Henry James- The Wings of the Dove - COMPLETE
March - Richard Ford - Canada - switched to Wildlife - COMPLETE
April - Louise Erdrich- The Roundhouse - COMPLETE
May - Sinclair Lewis- Main Street - COMPLETE
June - Wallace Stegner- American Places OTS
July - Ursula K. Le Guin - Lavinia
August - Larry McMurtry- Lonesome Dove OTS
September - Flannery O' Connor- A Good Man is Hard To Find - started but never finished
October - Ray Bradbury- Green Shadows, White Whale
November - Barbara Kingsolver- The Poisonwood Bible - this is a re-read
December - E.L. Doctorow- Ragtime

116maggie1944
maig 28, 2015, 8:39am

Mark, maybe you could make it a "month of your choice" and start, right now, a Kent Haruf thread for people to use whenever they start/finish one of his works. It seems we all look for possible substitutions from time to time, but not all at the same time.

117jnwelch
maig 28, 2015, 9:10am

>113 msf59:, >116 maggie1944: All in favor of Haruf added in either of those months, or a month of your choice. His new (and last) one, Our Souls at Night, is wonderful.

118laytonwoman3rd
maig 28, 2015, 1:19pm

>116 maggie1944: Excellent suggestion...I'll be reading more Haruf before too long, I hope.

119msf59
Editat: maig 28, 2015, 9:25pm

>116 maggie1944: That is a great idea, Karen! Thank you, my friend. I will post a Haruf, AAC thread, in the next few days.

In the meantime...

120msf59
Editat: maig 28, 2015, 9:29pm

121maggie1944
maig 29, 2015, 7:46am

Now, I have to find the books I purchased for my reading pleasure of Mr. Haruf. Sigh.

122msf59
Editat: maig 31, 2015, 4:21pm



I posted an honorary AAC thread to the late, great Kent Haruf. You can find it here: http://www.librarything.com/topic/191598#

>116 maggie1944: Your fantastic idea has blossomed, Karen. Thank you!

123maggie1944
maig 31, 2015, 4:48pm

Delighted! I love LT, and the 75ers, and wish I could do more reading, but I do what I can, and love it all! Thanks Mark for all that you do to help us all find great books.

124mhmr
juny 1, 2015, 10:56am

I've completed the AAC reading for January through May all during the last half of May, relying on our small local library and library inter-loan program for my selections.

Carson McCullers/ILLUMINATION AND NIGHT GLARE: /The Unfinished Autobiograpy of Carson McCullers
Henry James/THE WINGS OF THE DOVE
Richard Ford/THE SPORTSWRITER
Louise Erdrich/LOVE MEDICINE
Sinclair Lewis/MAIN STREET

My favorite read so far has been, The Wings of the Dove.

!Thanks Mark, for starting your AAC! It was a brilliant idea and I really enjoy it.

125AnneDC
juny 1, 2015, 3:59pm

I'm falling a little behind here (May was a washout--all I seem to have read was mysteries and crime series) but I will catch up! I have Babbitt and Angle of Repose in the queue.

126weird_O
juny 2, 2015, 6:32pm

I joined LT in March, and only got sucked into this AAC at the very end of April. So I began reading with the May author, Sinclair Lewis. In mid-May, I picked up several pertinent titles at a library book sale. I'm thinking I may be able to do makeup reading and finish the year having read at least one book by each of the 12 authors. So my list would be:

Carson McCullers: The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter
Henry James: The Ambassadors
Richard Ford: Independence Day
Louis Erdrich: A Plague of Doves
Sinclair Lewis: Dodsworth + (read in February) Main Street
Wallace Stegner: John Hill + The Spectator Bird
Ursula LeGuin: unknown, but I hope The Lathe of Heaven
Larry McMurtry: The Last Picture Show, and maybe Lonesome Dove
Flannery O'Connor: unknown, perhaps Wise Blood
Ray Bradbury: unknown, maybe The Illustrated Man
Barbara Kingsolver: Pigs in Heaven (I want to write Pigs...in...Space!!!)
E. L. Doctorow: The March + World's Fair

I have the books in hand. Except, of course, the three unknowns--LeGuin, O'Connor and Bradbury.

It's going to be FUN!

127maggie1944
juny 5, 2015, 9:46pm

weird_O, your list is most respectable. I unfortunately decided I'd bit off more than I could read, so I'm lurking about, enjoying others work through the challenge. You definitely do fit in with this crowd. Excellent list of good books, I believe.

128nittnut
Editat: juny 6, 2015, 12:23am

>126 weird_O: Barbara Kingsolver: Pigs in Heaven (I want to write Pigs...in...Space!!!) Bahahaha!

129msf59
Editat: juny 30, 2015, 8:45am



The Ursula K. Le Guin thread is up. This one should be a lot of fun:

http://www.librarything.com/topic/192700

130laytonwoman3rd
jul. 21, 2015, 9:32pm

Very sad to learn that E. L. Doctorow has died. I was so hoping for another novel from him.

131weird_O
jul. 21, 2015, 9:55pm

>130 laytonwoman3rd: Ditto that. I have two unread Doctorow books on the shelf for the December AAC. And I just got a copy of Ragtime to reread after my original MMPbk vanished.

132msf59
jul. 22, 2015, 7:16am

>130 laytonwoman3rd: Thanks for posting that, Linda! I love Doctorow and look forward to reading him again in December.

>131 weird_O: Ragtime is his masterwork. A perfect eulogy.

133msf59
Editat: jul. 22, 2015, 7:42pm



"E. L. Doctorow, a leading figure in contemporary American letters whose popular, critically admired and award-winning novels — including “Ragtime,” “Billy Bathgate” and “The March” — situated fictional characters in recognizable historical contexts, among identifiable historical figures and often within unconventional narrative forms, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. He was 84 and lived in Manhattan and Sag Harbor, N.Y.

The cause was complications from lung cancer, his son, Richard, said.

The author of a dozen novels, three volumes of short fiction and a stage drama, as well as essays and commentary on literature and politics, Mr. Doctorow was widely lauded for the originality, versatility and audacity of his imagination.

Subtly subversive in his fiction — less so in his left-wing political writing — he consistently upended expectations with a cocktail of fiction and fact, remixed in book after book; with clever and substantive manipulations of popular genres like the Western and the detective story; and with his myriad storytelling strategies. Deploying, in different books, the unreliable narrator, the stream-of-consciousness narrator, the omniscient narrator and multiple narrators, Mr. Doctorow was one of contemporary fiction’s most restless experimenters."

-NYT

RIP, Mr. Doctorow! I am glad we will be featuring this author in December!!

Once again, if you have not read Ragtime, you have a few of months to find a copy. It is a Must-Read!!

134LoisB
Editat: oct. 27, 2015, 11:55am

October Update
January - Carson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter DONE
February - Henry James - Daisy Miller DONE
March - Richard Ford - Canada DONE
April - Louise Erdrich - Love Medicine DONE
May - Sinclair Lewis - Babbitt DONE
June - Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety DONE
July - Kent Haruf - Plainsong DONE
August - Larry McMurtry - The Last Picture Show: A Novel DONE
September - Flannery O'Connor - Wise Blood: A Novel DONE
October - Ray Bradbury - The Halloween Tree DONE
November - Barbara Kingsolver - The Bean Trees: A Novel
December - E.L. Doctorow - Ragtime: A Novel

135msf59
Editat: jul. 31, 2015, 9:03pm



The McMurtry AAC thread is up: http://www.librarything.com/topic/193963#

136msf59
Editat: ag. 26, 2015, 9:16am



The O'Connor thread is up: http://www.librarything.com/topic/194950#5254279

Can you believe we are nearly into September and this is our 9th author? Where does that time go...

137laytonwoman3rd
ag. 26, 2015, 9:18am

Summer should be issued a speeding ticket...

138maggie1944
ag. 26, 2015, 9:58am

The weather outside is a bit "chilly" which is a big change for us.

139nittnut
ag. 26, 2015, 7:20pm

We are looking very much forward to Spring here. It's been a chilly winter. I say, let Summer race in, then give it a speeding ticket and slow it Waaaaay down. Lol. I am ready to get back on the beach with my kids and a good book. It's a hard life, I know. And with all of that, I will wish you northerners a pleasant fall and winter. :)

140Caroline_McElwee
Editat: ag. 29, 2015, 5:28pm

Mark, are you starting to think about next year yet? Don't forget Steinbeck! And how about May Sarton? I could go on forever ha...

141katiekrug
ag. 29, 2015, 5:49pm

Yes, Mark, if you need any help, I have a whole list ready to go :)

142laytonwoman3rd
ag. 30, 2015, 9:53pm

Yes, let's see...who haven't we done? Robert Penn Warren, Erskine Caldwell, Washington Irving, Dawn Powell, Shelby Foote, Reynolds Price, Ken Kesey, Annie Proulx, Stephen Jay Gould, Zora Neale Hurston, Annie Dillard, Lafcadio Hearn---there's a dozen, right there!

143thornton37814
ag. 31, 2015, 9:57am

There are still lots out there who have not been read. I think it might be interesting to include a poet in the mix this year. That genre seems to have been completely ignored in past challenges.

144katiekrug
ag. 31, 2015, 10:14am

I would love to see Richard Russo, John Irving, Jane Smiley, and Anne Tyler included. Agree with Linda especially on Zora Neale Hurston and Annie Dillard. Dillard is so under-appreciated, I think.

For poetry, I love Donald Hall. His collection Without is beautiful and heartbreaking, and very accessible for those who don't "do" poetry.

145msf59
Editat: ag. 31, 2015, 10:15am



If everyone wants to add their AAC 2016 choices here, I have no problem with it. I'll try to keep a list of all of them.

Do not fret: Steinbeck will be included. I am also thinking about Hemingway too...and Richard Russo, Ivan Doig, Anne Tyler...

I also really appreciate the female author recommendations.

FYI: I really would like to include an author with an expanded bibliography. This gives a reader a wider choice and it gives the reader a chance to go deeper, than the usual suspects. I think that has worked very well here.

Well, it definitely looks like we will be doing this for a few more years. LOL.

146laytonwoman3rd
Editat: ag. 31, 2015, 10:21am

>143 thornton37814: I like the idea of picking at least one poet for next year's Challenge. Readers could have included poetry in the first two years of the AAC: Willa Cather did write some, as did Faulkner (his is all wretched, really, and he called himself a "failed poet"); Louise Erdrich has 3 published collections of poetry, but I don't think anyone chose one of those to read this year. Let's promote the Poet!

>144 katiekrug: Yay, another vote for Annie Dillard! She has a fairly large bibliography, both fiction and non-fiction. And John Irving...some great stuff there, and I have 2 or 3 of his yet unread.

147msf59
ag. 31, 2015, 10:17am

>144 katiekrug: I like the inclusion of Irving and Smiley. It would give me a chance to finally get caught up with Smiley's current Family Saga.

148msf59
Editat: ag. 31, 2015, 10:22am

>146 laytonwoman3rd: I have read very little poetry, so I will have to rely of my LT pals, for these suggestions. I wonder if we should choose a man and a woman, for that particular month? Hmmmmm?

149katiekrug
ag. 31, 2015, 10:30am

Could it be an "open" month where any American poet would do? That could provide exposure to a lot more poets. But then you miss out on more shared reading experiences....

150thornton37814
ag. 31, 2015, 10:44am

Poets: Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Walt Whitman (all three of those are included on this list: http://americanprofile.com/articles/list-of-americas-top-20-authors/)

Other American poets: Carl Sandburg, Ezra Pound (an ex-pat), Wallace Stevens, John Ashbery, Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop (also wrote short stories), T. S. Eliot, Maya Angelou, Edna St. Vincent Millay (also wrote plays)

151Caroline_McElwee
ag. 31, 2015, 10:49am

Adding my vote for Annie Dillard.

I like the idea of the poetry, and of leaving it open just as 'American poets', see how many we can get through. As it happens I've just ordered a volume of Richard Wilburs work.

152jnwelch
ag. 31, 2015, 11:31am

I like the idea of including poetry, too, although I'd favor doing poets who are alive. Here's a good starter list: http://www.buzzfeed.com/sarahgalo/contemporary-poets-you-must-read#.utwLRkOzX. I'm a big fan of Danez Smith, Natasha Trethewey and Naomi Shihab Nye.

The two most popular American poets right now, as far as I know, are Mary Oliver and Billy Collins.

153msf59
ag. 31, 2015, 11:34am

Thanks for the poet recs! I think we will do a vote on the poet question, at some point. Open ended? Or just one or 2 authors. I am seriously divided. LOL.

154cbl_tn
ag. 31, 2015, 11:46am

I'd suggest putting the poetry in April to coincide with National Poetry Month.

155laytonwoman3rd
ag. 31, 2015, 1:12pm

>153 msf59: Maybe we could have a consensus on 2 or 3 poets, so there would be a hope of some common reading, but encourage reading some American poetry in April, no matter who is might be, to get a wider participation?

156weird_O
ag. 31, 2015, 1:23pm

For poetry, I suggest Ogden Nash.

157kac522
Editat: ag. 31, 2015, 1:55pm

Some women writers, in no particular order:

Amy Tan
Sandra Cisneros
Jane Smiley
Alice Walker (also poetry)
Madeleine L'Engle
Shirley Jackson (short stories)
Audrey Niffenegger
Louisa May Alcott
Joyce Carol Oates
Lisa See
Carol Shields
Gish Jen
Geraldine Brooks

Some poets:

Gwendolyn Brooks
Billy Collins
Maya Angelou
Elizabeth Bishop

158weird_O
ag. 31, 2015, 1:56pm

I fetched my notebook with American author names. Some have already been cited, so I won't repeat them. Also, I don't know who was included in previous years' challenges (2014; was there a 2013 and/or a 2012?)

Don DeLillo
Gore Vidal
John Hersey
William Styron
Michael Chabon
Nicholson Baker
Marilynne Robinson
Joyce Carol Oates
Ann Tyler
Alice McDermott

What about non-fiction writers? Halberstam, McCullough, John McPhee.

159msf59
Editat: ag. 31, 2015, 2:22pm

>155 laytonwoman3rd: I really like your idea, Linda. Thanks. Maybe 2 men and 2 women? Or is that to many?

>157 kac522: Thanks for supplying the women's list, Kathy. Several of those authors, I have not read.

160laytonwoman3rd
ag. 31, 2015, 2:56pm

>159 msf59: I don't think 2 and 2 is too many. I think we could ease into this, and not make a whole volume of poetry the goal...just a few poems from each, unless the reader gets really taken by one and wants to gobble up more.

161msf59
Editat: ag. 31, 2015, 5:42pm

>154 cbl_tn: April sounds perfect, Carrie. Thanks for the suggestion!

>160 laytonwoman3rd: This sounds good, Linda! If you can send me reminders, later in the year, that would be great.

162maggie1944
ag. 31, 2015, 7:54pm

I am liking the idea of adding some nonfiction writers, also.

163katiekrug
ag. 31, 2015, 8:45pm

I'm home from work and able to access the list I wrote up a while ago of potential good choices for the AAC:

Male:
Richard Russo
Stewart O'Nan
John Steinbeck
Kent Haruf (this was before he passed and was included in this year's)
Theodore Dreiser
Pat Conroy
Michael Chabon
Nathaniel Hawthorne

Female:
Geraldine Brooks
Anne Tyler
Joyce Carol Oates
Sue Miller
Zora Neale Hurston
Alice Hoffman
Lee Smith
Shirley Jackson
Jane Smiley

164nittnut
ag. 31, 2015, 9:06pm

Love Sandra Cisneros and Pam Munoz Ryan. Both would be great for Hispanic American fiction. Munoz Ryan writes mostly YA fiction, but I thought Esperanza Rising was a wonderful book for YA or adults.

I'll add my vote for Maya Angelou, Steinbeck and Louisa May Alcott (she's got a fun Gothic romance for those who don't want to tackle Little Women)

Sorry, I don't know who you've read in previous years, but here are a couple of my favorites:

Mark Twain
Jack London
Frederick Douglass (non-fiction)
Edith Wharton

165Copperskye
ag. 31, 2015, 9:30pm

>145 msf59: Since I don't participate in the themed author reads, I don't want to make any suggestions but I'm glad to see Ivan Doig and Anne Tyler on your list. :)

166msf59
Editat: ag. 31, 2015, 9:37pm

>163 katiekrug: Interesting list, Katie! I am sure Steinbeck, Tyler and Russo will make the cut. Chabon and Smiley are solid choices. I have not read Drieser, Oates or Hoffman.

I know Brooks lives in the U.S. now but she is Australian, right?

>164 nittnut: "I don't know who you've read in previous years." WHAT?? LOL.

Twain and Wharton were featured last year. I like London.

>165 Copperskye: " Since I don't participate in the themed author reads." WHAT?? LOL.

I am seriously considering Doig too!

167katiekrug
ag. 31, 2015, 9:37pm

>166 msf59: - I didn't know she was Australian. My bad.

I think O'Nan would be a good choice because he has a pretty long bibliography and tackles different topics and genres.

168Copperskye
ag. 31, 2015, 9:49pm

>167 katiekrug: O'Nan would be a great choice! :)

169msf59
ag. 31, 2015, 9:59pm

I like O' Nan too and I have added him to the list.

170msf59
Editat: ag. 31, 2015, 10:05pm



^^I started a working list up in post #4, so I will add names as we go.



^Hey, where is the Papa Hemingway love? He must be hitting a low point, in his literary relevance.

I am a fan of his work and I think he has done great work, I just prefer Steinbeck...always have.

171laytonwoman3rd
Editat: set. 1, 2015, 11:46am

>170 msf59: I can do without Hemingway these days. I've read enough of him (all of him except maybe some of the Nick Adams stories) over the years. He's iconic, but I really don't enjoy most of his work. There have been exceptions, though--The Green Hills of Africa, and A Moveable Feast, for example. I think it's interesting that he hasn't made it into the Library of America so far...I wonder what the story is there.

Another American nobody remembers (because they don't think of him AS American) is Nabokov. Not that I'm championing him for inclusion this year, but as time goes on he should probably be considered.

172nittnut
ag. 31, 2015, 10:15pm

>166 msf59: Um. This is my first year, so this is all I know. :)

>170 msf59: A little Hemingway goes a very long way. Like Linda ^ I have enjoyed some of his earlier work, but most of his stuff is a slog. Depressive.

173Limelite
set. 1, 2015, 9:44pm

Hope I'm not stepping on toes with these suggestions:

Eudora Welty
Annie Proulx
Thomas B Costain (USA naturalized, Canadian born) Nonfiction: series of 4 books on the Plantagenets, The Pageant of England, first of which is The Conquerors; Fiction: The Tontine
Robb Forman Dew surprisingly, not a man!
David Liss
Mark Helprin his politics are conservative but A Soldier of the Great War is sublime
Breena Clarke African-American
Anya Seton The Winthrop Woman
David Guterson
Andrew Sean Greer
Robert Goolrick
Nicole Krauss (guess who she's married to)

174Tara1Reads
set. 1, 2015, 10:07pm

>173 Limelite: Actually Nicole Krauss and Jonathan Safran Foer divorced. Safran Foer is now dating Michelle Williams who claims to be literary-minded with walls of books in her apartment.

http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/michelle-williams-and-jonathan-saf...

That's all for my useless bits of celebrity gossip.

175EBT1002
set. 1, 2015, 10:34pm

*whispers: Annie Dillard *

176Caroline_McElwee
set. 2, 2015, 1:47am

Oh yes, Stewert O'Nan. I only discovered him in the past year, and a secretion of his work has begun appearing!

177msf59
set. 2, 2015, 7:20am

>173 Limelite: Welcome to the AAC. Our celebration of American writers. Thanks for the recommendations. Surprisingly, I have not heard of several of those authors. You are going deep. We featured Welty last year.

I started a working list, up in post #4 for your viewing pleasure. Proulx and Dillard are featured.

178maggie1944
set. 2, 2015, 7:55am

Love Annie Dillard, and I remember coming across Thomas B. Costain when I was in my youff...... I don't know if his work will stand up to modern standards of historical fiction. Or did he write biographies, or nonfiction of some genre.

179streamsong
set. 2, 2015, 8:27am

Mary Doria Russell hasn't been mentioned yet. Is that because her bibliography is rather short and you've read all her books?

Sherman Alexie.

I'm sure I'm overlooking more .....

180laytonwoman3rd
Editat: set. 2, 2015, 8:38am

I enjoyed Costain in my "youff" too. The Silver Chalice, The Tontine...I wonder how they would hold up now. They are both still on my shelves. I also have a copy of The Three Edwards, which I acquired more recently, but have not read.

181laytonwoman3rd
set. 2, 2015, 2:29pm

Since we're considering poetry, let's not forget drama. We haven't touched that yet---Tennessee Williams, Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller, just to begin. I know it's sometimes hard to appreciate on the page, but we have avid theater-goers among us who could probably boost our enjoyment of many plays by discussing performances as well as the written versions.

182weird_O
set. 2, 2015, 2:41pm

There is Thorton Wilder, who did both novels and plays.

183laytonwoman3rd
set. 2, 2015, 3:03pm

>82 msf59: Yes, indeed!

184Limelite
set. 2, 2015, 3:30pm

>174 Tara1Reads: Thanks for the correction; my pop culture IQ is zero.

>177 msf59: Thanks for the pointers; I'll go do some homework and catch up!

Pretty much, I was trying to remember authors who had a large body of work and who offered wide diversity as people and as writers. I'll side with poets and playwrights, too. Some suggestions: David Henry Hwang, playwright, M Butterfly. Philip Levine, blue-collar poet and for contrast, Elizabeth Bishop.

Have you done Thomas Wolfe, Look Homeward, Angel? Not highly prolific, but rich-textured novelist.

185laytonwoman3rd
set. 2, 2015, 3:40pm

Elizabeth Bishop has been on my Must Get To list for a while now.

186LoisB
set. 2, 2015, 3:40pm

One thing that I think is important is that the author has a large body of work that is generally-available in libraries around the world. I have been participating in the ANZAC challenge (as well as BAC) this year. In many cases, I could only locate one or two books for each author, and this month I can't find a book for either author.

187EBT1002
set. 2, 2015, 8:39pm

>181 laytonwoman3rd: I would love to tackle a play with this group. Tennessee Williams would get a vote from me. Lorraine Hansberry probably wrote too few works to qualify but I think A Raisin in the Sun is an excellent American drama.

188kac522
set. 2, 2015, 8:48pm

>187 EBT1002: I loved A Raisin in the Sun, too. Might be nice to have one month (doesn't have to be next year!) of "one-hit wonders"--a list of writers who are chiefly known for 1 or 2 works, and we can make a choice. Or to have the "one-hit wonders" list as an alternate/extra month if the author of the month doesn't catch your fancy. Sort of like what the BAC challenge has.

189laytonwoman3rd
set. 3, 2015, 8:40am

>188 kac522: Oooh....I like that idea.

190Caroline_McElwee
set. 5, 2015, 1:35pm

Errr, I think next year needs to be a fortnightly American Author Challenge :-)

>181 laytonwoman3rd: I'm with you on that too.

191banjo123
set. 6, 2015, 2:22pm

I am going to vote for Amy Tan and Sherman Alexie. I will refrain from any other votes so that those two can have all my support.

However, I have to point out a couple of suggested authors are not actually from the US. Geraldine Brooks, excellent author, from Australia. Carol Shields is Canadian.

192laytonwoman3rd
set. 6, 2015, 5:44pm

I don't know if we have an agreed-upon definition for "American". Geraldine Brooks is an American citizen now, and both March and Caleb's Crossing are very "American" books, written by an American citizen.

193msf59
set. 7, 2015, 8:50am



^If I had to pick a favorite novel about our country's labor struggles, I would have to go with In Dubious Battle. If you have not read it, keep in mind Mr. Steinbeck WILL be featured in next year's AAC. Yes, I am shameless.

Do you have a favorite book that captures the labor movement?

194banjo123
set. 7, 2015, 11:39pm

For a labor book, how about God’s Bits of Wood by Sengalese writer Sembene Ousmane. It is about the Dakar-Niger railway strike on 1947-48. It's not an American book though.

195cbl_tn
Editat: set. 8, 2015, 7:00am

Carol Shields was born in the US. She moved to Canada when she married a Canadian citizen. She won a Pulitzer so I think it would be safe to include her.

196banjo123
set. 9, 2015, 12:30am

>192 laytonwoman3rd: good point. I guess Mark gets to decide on the definition, since it is his challenge.

>195 cbl_tn: Wow--I did not know that and have always seen her listed as a Canadian writer.

197EBT1002
Editat: set. 9, 2015, 12:36am

>193 msf59: Well, In Dubious Battle is one Steinbeck which I have not yet read so I'll look forward to reading it in whatever month you designate in 2016! You know that I'm a huge fan of his writing, so I'm happy to have him as one of our AAC-III twelve.

198msf59
set. 9, 2015, 7:17am

Ooh, I like the sound of the AAC-III Twelve. It has a regal ring to it. In Dubious Battle will be a good choice.

199BLBera
Editat: set. 9, 2015, 6:34pm

Sorry if some of these have been mentioned already:
Maya Angelou
Julia Alvarez
Jonis Agee
Andrea Barrett
Alice Hoffman
Meg Wolitzer
Leslie Marmon Silko
Ann Tyler
Francine Prose

T.C. Boyle
Kurt Vonnegut

You could always do a repeat of authors with a large body of work.

200msf59
set. 9, 2015, 6:47pm

>199 BLBera: Thanks for sharing your AAC recs, Beth. Good list. I particularly like Andrea Barrett and T.C. Boyle.

Vonnegut made the cut last year and Tyler is on the "rough list" already. I posted the list in #4.

Not familiar with Agee and Prose.

201EBT1002
set. 11, 2015, 10:18am

Ooh, Francine Prose. Nice one. I read Lovers at the Chameleon Club: Paris 1932 earlier this year and it was excellent. I see she has a pretty decent list of other works and she is a bit more obscure, perhaps, than some of the others.

I've not heard of Jonis Agee yet, either, but I do like it when the AAC introduces us to some new authors. :-)

Mark, I'm glad you like the sound of AAC-III Twelve. :-)

202laytonwoman3rd
set. 11, 2015, 12:41pm

>4 msf59: I like the way the list is taking shape. May I make a suggestion, though, considering either Alice Walker or Zora Neale Hurston in place of one of the white men on that list? There's no African American voice represented otherwise.

203kac522
Editat: set. 11, 2015, 1:56pm

>202 laytonwoman3rd: Lots of thumbs up to that suggestion--other suggestions for diversity: Asian: Amy Tan and Gish Jen; Hispanic: Sandra Cisneros.

Maybe Darryl (kidzdoc) who is so widely read in lots of areas could give us suggestions of some noteworthy writers of color that we've missed?

204Limelite
set. 11, 2015, 8:25pm

Octavia Butler? Af-Am, about dozen novels, sci-fi author.

Breena Clarke? Af-Am, three novels all historical fiction, I think. I've read Stand the Storm and thought it very good.

Junot Diaz? Dominican-American, male. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, a real tour de force some readers may find offensive..

Ana Castillo? Chicana, novels, poems, essays, short stories.

Oscar Hijuelos? Cuban American, male, Pulitzer winner for The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love. I didn't like it -- no accounting for taste.

If any of these names haven't been listed, of course.

205BLBera
set. 12, 2015, 12:08pm

Luis Alberto Urrea has written quite a few novels. What about Sherman Alexie? Julia Alvarez writes both prose and poetry.

206weird_O
set. 12, 2015, 10:19pm

How come there's no love for William Styron, author of Sophie's Choice, The Confessions of Nat Turner, Lie Down in Darkness. Winner of a Pulitzer.

How come there's no love for Don DeLillo, author of Underworld, Mao II, White Noise, Libra.

Just askin'...

207EBT1002
set. 13, 2015, 1:49am

>206 weird_O: I think William Styron is an excellent writer, Bill, and I have a couple of Don DeLillo works on my shelves, waiting to be read.

I think one of the challenges in putting together a list is trying to capture some of the diversity that "American Authors" includes. Mark has no small task in front of him. :-)

208msf59
set. 13, 2015, 8:51am

We have scores of authors to choose from, so be patient, your time will come....LOL.

Sadly, I have never read Styron. He seems to be an author who has faded and might need a resurgence.

DeLillo is a solid choice and I have him on the long list. I have read a couple of his but NEED to explore more of his work.

I am also a fan of both Alexie and Urrea.

209laytonwoman3rd
Editat: oct. 26, 2015, 2:14pm

Styron is an excellent choice. I've not got around to DeLillo either. I'm not sure anyone has mentioned Reynolds Price yet. He could fit in either fiction or poetry. Non-fiction too, for that matter.

EDIT: (to self) Yes, you dummy. YOU mentioned him already. >142 laytonwoman3rd:

210RBeffa
Editat: set. 14, 2015, 12:04pm

What I like about this year's challenge is the mix of author's I should have read along with ones I like but have under-read. Random that it happened.

It seems that authors who are primarily genre authors are discouraged for this (going by the nominations, so I left off a few names)

Here's three I like and would happily read more for next year (I see two of them already shortlisted):

John Steinbeck
Ernest Hemingway
Ivan Doig

honorable mention for a non-fiction: David McCullough

American authors I want to explore (some I have read and some I have read little or none of), in no order, and including some genre:

Mary Doria Russell
Ernest J Gaines
Pearl Buck
A.B. Guthrie Jr
Shelby Foote
Philip K Dick
Elizabeth Strout (perhaps not enough of a catalog)
Sherri Tepper
Robert Silverberg

I also like seeing Jack London

Ron

eta:
>209 laytonwoman3rd: Reynolds Price has been one of those "I should try him sometime" names for me

211msf59
Editat: set. 14, 2015, 3:47pm

Thanks for chiming in, Ron! I like your selections. It looks like Steinbeck and Doig will make the cut for 2016. Hemingway remains a question mark. Not much love for him, in these parts.

I am crazy about MDR and I want to read more Strout. I also think Foote and Dick are fine choices. Not familiar with Tepper or Silverberg.

I am considering a Nonfiction November, probably not next year but possibly the next? And certainly McCullough is an excellent choice.

ETA: London made the cut up there too! Check post # 4.

212RBeffa
set. 14, 2015, 4:21pm

>211 msf59: Tepper is labeled a feminist writer of science fiction and fantasy. I've only read a little of her and she seems to be one that some people adore and some don't like. I've liked what I've read.

Silverberg is primarily a science fiction writer but he has also written some very good historical fiction as well as light fantasy, non-fiction, essays etc across categories. (I've got a book of his on ghost towns of the west ferinstance). He has a huge catalog of books which could be rather daunting. he's written both great as well as so-so stuff, and some experimental things, but one of the things I like about him is that he is very accessible for someone who wants to try science fiction. Genres tend to get rather loaded with built in tropes that can make it hard for someone not used to it to "break in" I think Silverberg in many/most of his books is very accessible. He won't throw stuff at you that requires one to have read 50 sci fi books to appreciate. In other words, I think he's a good gateway.

213LoisB
set. 14, 2015, 10:02pm

>211 msf59: My thoughts:

I like Hemingway! I actually toured his home in Key West last year - he had a lot of cats, the descendants of which are still there.

I hope you stay away from genre authors.

I like non-fiction.

214EBT1002
Editat: set. 23, 2015, 10:35pm

Oh, I remember reading something by Sherri Tepper eons ago. I vaguely remember liking what I read. Must go investigate....

ETA: Nope, none of those books rings any bells! Like I said, it was eons ago!

215weird_O
set. 24, 2015, 12:18pm

>4 msf59: Hey, so I am so ready for 2016. Made up a little chart with the "Very Good Possibilities" authors, and have a book or three penciled in for all but three of them.

216msf59
set. 24, 2015, 12:34pm

>216 msf59: It is nice to have some books on shelf, Bill, or at least some good ideas, for next year's AAC. It sure makes, it smoother and you are not scrambling, last minute.

^I may tweak the list up there, (post #4) but that might be pretty close to what I will do.

217msf59
Editat: set. 26, 2015, 9:40am



^The Bradbury Challenge is up. Stop over and let us know what you are reading:

http://www.librarything.com/topic/196214

219Ameise1
oct. 21, 2015, 12:53pm

So, I've finished my (>11 Ameise1:) ACC 2015. It was a lot of fun and I read authors I haven't read before. Now I'm looking forward to ACC 2016.

220laytonwoman3rd
Editat: oct. 21, 2015, 1:38pm

May I also throw in Pete Hamill, who I don't think has been mentioned yet?

221katiekrug
oct. 21, 2015, 4:20pm

That's a great suggestion, Linda! I loved his Snow in August and have been meaning to read the two others on my shelf...

222laytonwoman3rd
oct. 21, 2015, 4:41pm

>221 katiekrug: He's written some pretty fine non-fiction, too.

223msf59
oct. 21, 2015, 9:25pm

>218 PaulCranswick: Thanks, Paul. I appreciate the suggestions. Many fine choices. Styron has been nominated a couple of times. I have never read him.

I like the idea of adding Boyle, Proulx and Dexter. I will have to consider them for next time.

Did you see #4? That will probably be the list for AAC3, with a tweak or 2.

224msf59
Editat: oct. 26, 2015, 9:16am



The Kingsolver thread is up: http://www.librarything.com/topic/201876

Can you believe, we only have one more left? Time is slippery...

225Limelite
oct. 27, 2015, 3:26pm

I've been unaware of the author Sharon Kay Penman who is an LT author and who writes massive historical novels. I am planning to tackle my first by her. Among those who have an opinion of her writing, do you think two months should be set aside for her if she's chosen for the 2016 list? Seriously, her novels are lengthy but her research is reputed to be thorough and deep.

I'm going to tackle The Sunne in Splendour in its first edition at 920+pp.

226PaulCranswick
nov. 10, 2015, 7:02pm

>225 Limelite: The Sunne in Splendour is a great read - you'll do it in a week max as those pages get chewed up as you follow Dickon to his inevitable end.

227Smiler69
nov. 12, 2015, 12:37pm

Are you still taking suggestions for 2016 Mark? If so, I'll go through my tbr and come up with a wishlist.

228Limelite
nov. 12, 2015, 2:27pm

>226 PaulCranswick:

Tell you what. I'll find the local strongman and ask him to rip the book in half down the spine. I'll keep the first half of the book and read it; you take the second. Then, maybe "I" can read it in a week!

229msf59
nov. 12, 2015, 6:19pm

>227 Smiler69: Hi, Ilana! I already compiled suggestions. Check out post #4. Those top 12 will most likely be my choices. I just have to subtract one and put them in monthly order. Hopefully, you have several of those authors in your TBR. Nothing obscure.

230PaulCranswick
nov. 12, 2015, 6:44pm

>228 Limelite: Hahaha, well I certainly couldn't tear it in two! You are much better with the second half as it 'rushes' to its conclusion.

231Smiler69
nov. 13, 2015, 12:47pm

>229 msf59: Ok, I will patiently wait for the list to be firmed up Mark, as I've started my planning list for 2016; fitting in the various challenges. Already between the BAC and CAC, I'm far from certain I'll be able to cover all the authors. Some choices will have to be made for sure, but I usually let my moods make the choosing when it gets down to picking the next read or listen.

232RBeffa
nov. 13, 2015, 1:16pm

Here's what I've done so far this year. Only one substitution for March, so not a purist. I've tried Richard Ford before and he wasn't to my liking.

For The American Author challenge my reading so far has been:
January - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter Carson McCullers finished 1/16/15
February - The Lesson of the Master Henry James finished 2/18/15
March - substitute: In My Father's House by Ernest J Gaines finished 3/18/15
April - Tracks Louise Erdrich finished March 31, 2015
May - Sinclair Lewis- Kingsblood Royal finished May 5, 2015
June - Wallace Stegner Angle of Repose finished June 19, 2015
July - Ursula K. Le Guin Rocannon's World finished July 1, 2015, Planet of Exile finished July 3, 2015, City of Illusions finished July 23, 2015
August - Larry McMurtry - Streets of Laredo finished August 8, 2015
September - Flannery O' Connor- A Good Man Is Hard To Find finished Sept 25, 2015
October - Ray Bradbury- read The October Country, Farewell Summer, Summer Morning Summer Night and others through the month
November - Barbara Kingsolver- currently reading Homeland
December - E.L. Doctorow plan to read The March or Homer and Langley
AAC Tribute author: Where You Once Belonged by Kent Haruf, finished June 26, 2015

233msf59
nov. 15, 2015, 2:43pm

>232 RBeffa: You have done a great job, Ron! Who needs purity anyway? LOL.

I have the new Haruf to get to, before the end of the year. At least it's a shorty. Thanks for the reminder.

234RBeffa
nov. 16, 2015, 3:08pm

>233 msf59: I made an effort to keep up with a couple challenges this year. The AAC was my successful one and a rewarding one. I think next year I need to go on the challenge light plan!

235EBT1002
nov. 17, 2015, 10:18pm

>234 RBeffa: "...next year I need to go on the challenge light plan!"
I agree!

236msf59
Editat: nov. 19, 2015, 8:34am



Drum roll please...here are the picks for AACIII. I think it is a nice mix:

January- Anne Tyler
February- Richard Russo
March- Jane Smiley
April- Poetry Month
May- Ivan Doig
June- Annie Proulx
July- John Steinbeck
August- Joyce Carol Oates
September- John Irving
October- Michael Chabon
November- Annie Dillard
December- Don DeLillo

I added this to post #4 too, for easy access. Thanks everyone, for some great suggestions. If your author didn't make the cut, there is always AACIV.

237PaulCranswick
nov. 19, 2015, 9:11am

>236 msf59: So Stuart O'Nan got dumped! I think you picked right - I pretend to be well-read and had never heard of him! Still I have bought a book of his just in case. :D

238msf59
nov. 19, 2015, 9:22am

I like Stewart O' Nan quite a bit but I thought DeLillo was a fine addition, since I have read very little of him.

239katiekrug
nov. 19, 2015, 9:32am

That's a great list, though I was hoping more people would get introduced to O'Nan. But I will carry a torch for him for 2017!

Several of these authors have written Pulitzer winners which sit unread on my shelves, so I will try to prioritize those.

240msf59
nov. 19, 2015, 10:10am

Sorry about, O' Nan, KAK. He was beat out, in the stretch by Mr. DeLillo.

241weird_O
Editat: nov. 19, 2015, 10:56am

Excellent list, Mark. Too bad about April, though. I think I'll read some Ogden Nash in April. :-)

You did get 7 Pulitzer honorees on there. Oates has been a finalist several times, as has DeLillo. I believe Irving and Doig are the only two not mentioned among the Pulitzer winners and finalists.

242laytonwoman3rd
nov. 19, 2015, 10:50am

I love this list. I have read something by everyone on it with the exception of DeLillo, and will be most happy to read more of most of these authors. Smiley is not a favorite based on what I've read so far, but I didn't HATE her, and I'll give her another chance.

243rosalita
nov. 19, 2015, 11:25am

I'm NOT complaining in any way because it's your list and you do a wonderful job every year, but I loathe DeLillo and love O'Nan, so ...

:-)

244Ameise1
nov. 19, 2015, 11:37am

Thanks so much, Mark. Will have a look what authors I can find here.

245laytonwoman3rd
nov. 19, 2015, 11:38am

Are you doing a "Wild Card" author? O'Nan is getting a lot of love...

246katiekrug
nov. 19, 2015, 11:48am

If I were a rabble-rouser and there weren't a million knock-off challenges already, I'd start a Shadow AAC ;-)

Your list is great, Mark, and I hope to stick with it all the way until the end of next year (unlike this year, when I think I made it halfway...)!

247rosalita
nov. 19, 2015, 11:51am

>246 katiekrug: No more challenges, please! I can't keep up as it is, shamefully. :-)

248jnwelch
nov. 19, 2015, 12:00pm

Nice list!

249msf59
Editat: nov. 19, 2015, 12:12pm

Voteu: Should I replace DeLillo with O'Nan?.

Xifra actual: 3, No 12, Indecís 2
^It is early days, right? Go to keep the troops happy. Grins...

(I will not vote, unless it is a tie)

250katiekrug
nov. 19, 2015, 12:13pm

>247 rosalita: - So, you won't be joining my Kazakh Author Challenge next year?

Not a rabble-rouser, my friend. I just occasionally like to tease Mark.

251msf59
Editat: nov. 19, 2015, 12:15pm

>241 weird_O: I did not realize there were that many Pulitzer Prize winners on there, Bill. Cool! 2 birds with one stone, I always say...

>245 laytonwoman3rd: We will see how it goes, Linda.

>250 katiekrug: "I just occasionally like to tease Mark." And I hope you never stop, KAK.

252rosalita
nov. 19, 2015, 1:22pm

>249 msf59: I voted No, because you should get to choose who you want with your Challenge, Mark! I was just funnin' ya a little ...

253katiekrug
nov. 19, 2015, 1:35pm

Ditto what Julia said.

254weird_O
nov. 19, 2015, 1:43pm

Mark, I see you nixed Jack London, along with O'Nan. But I accept the list as is. DON'T screw with it.

Starting in 1980, the Pulitzer folks have included the titles of "finalists" in their announcements. JCOates has been a runner up repeatedly, including 2015. Tyler was a finalist with The Accidental Tourist and with Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant before winning with Breathing Lessons. (I may try to read all three, since I have copies.) DeLillo has twice been a finalist, for Mao II and Underworld. Only Irving and Doig (and O'Nan) haven't been recognized.

But I think I'm kind of repeating myself.

Oh, just one thing. Why didn't you include Styron? Or Stephen King? Hunter Thompson comes to mind. Tom Wolfe. Tina Fey. Chelsea Handler.

255laytonwoman3rd
nov. 19, 2015, 2:22pm

Styron definitely needs to be on the list one of these years.

256jnwelch
nov. 19, 2015, 2:47pm

I need some inspiration for reading DeLillo, so I voted to keep him in.

257PaulCranswick
nov. 19, 2015, 6:40pm

James Fenimore Cooper, Jack London, William Styron, Bernard Malamud, Edgar Allan Poe; you have plenty of stuff for AACIV - AACXXX!
Pleased with your picks mate - you do a splendid job with a difficult task to get a balanced list that has something for most of us. Don't think we should meddle with it now you have set it out.

258lindapanzo
nov. 19, 2015, 6:46pm

Great list for 2016, Mark!! Looking forward to AACIII.

259msf59
Editat: nov. 19, 2015, 7:25pm

It looks like we are sticking with DeLillo for December! I would had no problem with changing it but I am glad to see the support on keeping Old Don around. I know I have some books of his to read.

>257 PaulCranswick: Thanks, Paul. Plenty of choices for AACIV, already. B.A.G.

>258 lindapanzo: Thanks, Linda! I hope you can join us on a few.

I have added Mr. Styron to the "possible list" for next time.

260maggie1944
nov. 19, 2015, 9:03pm

Great choices, Mark!

261lkernagh
Editat: nov. 20, 2015, 12:27am

>236 msf59: - Looks like a good mix, Mark. Nice choices. Very happy to see Richard Russo, Ivan Doig and Michael Chabon all made the list. Steinbeck daunts me, but it is always good to tackle an author that daunts you every once in a while. I have to admit that I have never heard of Annie Dillard or Don DeLillo, so it looks like I have some research to do before making any book choices for 2016.

>249 msf59: - I voted undecided as I know nothing about either author.

262msf59
nov. 20, 2015, 7:26am

>261 lkernagh: Please don't be daunted by Mr. Steinbeck, (still, my favorite author). Start with Of Mice and Men and then Cannery Row. That should prepare you for the heavier stuff.

Hope you can join us on a few of those authors.

263Smiler69
Editat: nov. 20, 2015, 12:55pm

Great list Mark. I too am not sure I'll read anything by DeLillo, but that's simply because he isn't on my tbr and what with so many challenges I want to participate in, some authors are bound to get dropped here and there. On the other hand, I didn't have anything by Annie Dillard either, but I ordered Pilgrim at Tinker Creek from AbeBooks last night. I didn't vote about DeLillo either because I agree with Julia and others that it's your privilege to make the final picks as challenge organizer. Besides which, I'm sure there will be many more editions of the AAC!

Here is what I plan on reading from my tbr for the challenge:

January:
Breathing Lessons by Anne Tyler (AAC + Pulitzer)
February:
Nobody's Fool by Richard Russo
March:
Some Luck by Jane Smiley
May:
English Creek by Ivan Doig
June:
The Shipping News Annie Proulx - reread (AAC + Pulitzer)
July:
Sweet Thursday by John Steinbeck - missed it during our Steinbeckathon
August:
Lovely, Dark, Deep by Joyce Carol Oates
September:
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
October:
The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon
November:
Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard (AAC + Pulitzer)

264msf59
nov. 20, 2015, 7:24pm

>263 Smiler69: Thanks, Ilana. It will be nice to have you a board, in 2016. Like Paul, you have all of your picks selected. Good job. I haven't even decided which ones I'll be reading. LOL. I might be joining you on Some Luck, since I have been meaning to get to that one, since it was released.

Good luck!

265kidzdoc
Editat: nov. 21, 2015, 6:23am

Congratulations on your choices for AAC III, Mark. I own books by only three of those 11 authors: A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler, Black Girl/White Girl by Joyce Carol Oates, and Telegraph Avenue by Michael Chabon, so my participation next year will be limited, at best.

266msf59
nov. 21, 2015, 7:19am

Hi, Darryl! Glad you might join us, on a few titles, at least. I did not pick the authors, based on my TBR piles, so several of these authors, I will have to search out, which is fine with me.

267Limelite
nov. 23, 2015, 9:59am

What an exciting list of American authors you've selected. I really appreciate that you've chosen so many living authors who will benefit if groupies buy their books in order to fulfill their commitments.

If challenged to come up with a list of favorite American authors, zi couldn't do much better than that.

Richard Russo's Straight Man is one of the funniest and poignant exploration of academia and family that's ever been written. Absolutely laugh-out-loud funny.

So is Chabon's Gentlemen of the Road -- the ne plus ultra of "road" novels, IMO. Reading it is like watching a movie on the page.

Of all of Tyler's novels, I'm still counting as my favorite The Accidental Tourist. Siblings who stock their pantry with cans in alphabetical order only exist in Tyler's imagination and my memory forever. You can't beat Tyler for quirkiness and heartbreak.

Ivan Doig has been a favorite of mine for over 30 years and I still mourn his death because such a gentle and great soul that he possessed was found in every book he wrote. One of my favorites is his paean to the American public school written in a time when politicians are trying to denigrate and destroy our system of public education. The book is The Whistling Season.

For folks timid about trying DeLillo, please don't be. He's almost 80, yet his imaginative powers are 50 years younger and experimental. Point Omega is a recapitulation of Delillo's literary artistry and thematic musings about time, film, hypnotic prose-poetry, and his personal philosophy of American life.

Again, great choice of writers. Lucky year of reading coming up!

268msf59
nov. 23, 2015, 7:26pm

>267 Limelite: Thanks, Limelite, for all your comments & recommendations, regarding the AAC. I hope you can join us for a few.

I am not familiar with Straight Man. I might have to look into that one. Sounds good.

The Accidental Tourist remains my favorite too. I have not read Gentlemen of the Road. Have not decided which Chabon to read.

Loved your DeLillo comments.

269katiekrug
nov. 23, 2015, 9:14pm

Another vote for Straight Man. And for Gentlemen of the Road. Both are great!

270msf59
Editat: nov. 26, 2015, 9:02am



^The E.L. Doctorow thread is up. Come by and drop a star and let us know what you will be reading:

http://www.librarything.com/topic/206084



Wow! Our last American author of the year. We did it! Thanks to everyone for making AACII a success. Looking forward to doing this again, next year.

271thornton37814
nov. 30, 2015, 6:33pm

I'm sure the choices are fine. I'm still working on the Kingsolver book and will hopefully finish it in December. I've just had way too many interruptions in my life this month. I mostly got audio books "read."

272msf59
nov. 30, 2015, 9:52pm

Hi, Lori! It's nice to have you along, no matter what you are able to read. Smiles...

273countrylife
des. 6, 2015, 9:40am

Closing out my American Author Challenge reads, I wanted to say, Mark, that I appreciate the opportunity to experience authors that I wouldn't otherwise grab. I really like your format of one author per month, and the mix is always interesting.

After plowing through some AA authors that I didn’t care for last year, I gave myself permission to abandon books this time around, after first giving all of them a try. In hindsight, I could have abandoned a few more. Wallace Stegner was, far and away, my favorite author this year.

January:
Carson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter (2.1 stars) 1/28/15
February:
Henry James - The Turn of the Screw (3.6 stars) 2/10/15
Henry James - Washington Square (3.3 stars) 2/20/15
March:
Richard Ford - Women with Men (3 stars) 3/18/15
April:
Louise Erdrich - The Birchbark House (3.6 stars) 4/1/15
May:
Sinclair Lewis - Elmer Gantry (abandoned) (5/15)
June:
Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety (4.5 stars) 6/8/15
July:
Ursula K. Le Guin - A Wizard of Earthsea (3.3 stars) 7/13/15
August:
Larry McMurtry - By Sorrow's River (2.5 stars) 8/3/15
September:
Flannery O' Connor - The Violent Bear it Away (3 stars) 9/5/15
October:
Ray Bradbury - Something Wicked This Way Comes (3.5 stars) 10/4/15
November:
Barbara Kingsolver - Prodigal Summer (2 stars) 11/4/15
December:
E.L. Doctorow - Homer and Langley (3.8 stars) 12/2/15

274msf59
des. 7, 2015, 9:22am

>273 countrylife: Great job, Cindy! You earned a "Purity Button". Sorry, more of the books didn't grab you. Always hoping people find a few GEMS, throughout the year. I would also agree that Crossing to Safety is the best of the bunch, that you had read.

See you next year!

275weird_O
des. 8, 2015, 10:33am

I'm diligently reading The Ambassadors for February, which will complete my reading of the regularly scheduled authors for 2015. Yesterday I found a copy of Plainsong in a local used-book store. The place is clean and tidy and well-lighted, but they've got more books than can be displayed spine out. Each shelf has books stacked behind the exposed, spine-out book row. The Haruf was hidden in the back. I'm pretty sure I can get these two books finished this year to wrap up the AACII (along with three others so I hit 100 books for the year!).

276katiekrug
des. 8, 2015, 11:44am

Just FYI, The Accursed by Joyce Carol Oates (August 2016 AAC choice) is $1.99 on Kindle (US) today. It's a chunkster (the print edition says 704 pages, the Kindle says 1000+), but if it's anything like her other long, Gothic-y, supernatural-y novels (e.g. Bellefleur), it will read really quickly.

The blurb says: A major historical novel from "one of the great artistic forces of our time" (The Nation)—an eerie, unforgettable story of possession, power, and loss in early-twentieth-century Princeton, a cultural crossroads of the powerful and the damned.

277Caroline_McElwee
Editat: des. 11, 2015, 8:34am

2015

Here's what happened:

January: Carson McCullers Ballad of Sad Café (read) ****1/2
February: Henry James The Bostonians, (half through)
March: Richard Ford Canada its been on the pile a while (ran out of time)
April: Louise Eldridge: Love Medicine (read) *** 1/2
May: Sinclair Lewis: Babbitt (not on the mood for it yet)
June: Wallace Stegner: Remembering Laughter (read) ***
July: Ursula La Guin The Left Hand of Darkness (read) ****
August: Larry McMurthy Lonesome Dove I started this a year or so ago, was loving it but not quite in the frame of mind for a slow novel, so I'll return to it. (Didn't get to it, but I will)
September: Flannery O'Connor A Circle in the Fire and other Stories - didn't get to
October: Ray Bradbury Martian Chronicles - didn't get to
November: Barbara Kingsolver Prodigal Summer - nope, didn't have time
December: E L Doctorow - Hoping to read something of his this month

All of the above I own except the Eldridge, and I bought the La Guin when I decided to read it as part of the challenge, so 10 of the books will be off the shelf

Read so far 4 1/2 of 12

I do plan to read a Doctorow, and I might manage the Bradbury by the end of the year, so that will just nudge me over 50%.

Still pondering whether I will participate next year. It may be an aim to read a few rather than them all! Also interested in the Canadian list.

278EBT1002
des. 13, 2015, 3:48pm

I read Ragtime and am glad to have done so. I gave it 3.5 stars for the writing and the storytelling. I think it would be best appreciated if read in largish chunks of time rather than interspersed throughout a busy and stressful week. :-|

279LoisB
des. 15, 2015, 3:18pm

December Update
January - Carson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter DONE
February - Henry James - Daisy Miller DONE
March - Richard Ford - Canada DONE
April - Louise Erdrich - Love Medicine DONE
May - Sinclair Lewis - Babbitt DONE
June - Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety DONE
July - Kent Haruf - Plainsong DONE
August - Larry McMurtry - The Last Picture Show: A Novel DONE
September - Flannery O'Connor - Wise Blood: A Novel DONE
October - Ray Bradbury - The Halloween Tree DONE
November - Barbara Kingsolver - The Bean Trees: A Novel DONE
December - E.L. Doctorow - Ragtime: A Novel DONE

Completed - but Ihad to substitute Kebt Haruf's Plainsong for July.

280AnneDC
des. 15, 2015, 3:49pm

Year to Date:

January - Carson McCullers - The Member of the Wedding ✔
February - Henry James - The Ambassadors, Washington Square, Daisy Miller ✔
March - Richard Ford - Canada ✔
April - Louise Erdrich - The Last Report of the Miracles at Little No Horse ✔
May - Sinclair Lewis - Main Street ✔
June - Wallace Stegner - Angle of Repose Still reading
July - Ursula Le Guin - Lavinia ✔
August - Larry McMurtry - The Last Picture Show ✔
September - Flannery O'Connor - The Violent Bear it Away ✔
October - Ray Bradbury - Something Wicked This Way Comes ✔
November - Barbara Kingsolver - The Bean Trees ✔
December - E.L. Doctorow - still deciding which book

281msf59
des. 15, 2015, 6:18pm

>279 LoisB: Very impressive, Lois! And I am glad you got a Haruf in there.

>280 AnneDC: Fine job, Anne! Haven't seen you around the threads much this year. We miss you but I am glad to see you are doing plenty of reading.

282Caroline_McElwee
des. 16, 2015, 11:59am

Adding my cheers, Lois and Anne.

283Caroline_McElwee
des. 16, 2015, 12:01pm

Mark, is there a thread for AACIII yet. Third time lucky maybe!

284msf59
Editat: des. 16, 2015, 5:48pm

>283 Caroline_McElwee: No, there is not, Caroline. Thanks for the reminder. LOL. I'll try to get it posted, in the next week or so.

Did you see the picks for the AACIII, in post #4?

285katiekrug
des. 16, 2015, 5:55pm

Can't post the AAC III until Jim posts the 2016 group or people will be all sorts of confused!

286msf59
des. 16, 2015, 6:43pm

Good point, Katie. Thanks! It got me off the hook. LOL.

287drneutron
des. 16, 2015, 9:35pm

It won't be long now... :)

288AnneDC
des. 18, 2015, 11:23am

>281 msf59: You are right, Mark, I haven't been around much this year--lurking on various challenge threads and using my own thread mostly to keep my reading list somewhat up to date. Oh well, there is always next year. And I have really enjoyed continuing with the AAC this year and think you've picked a fabulous list for Year 3.

289msf59
Editat: des. 18, 2015, 11:53am

>288 AnneDC: Looking forward to seeing you on the AAC, next year, Anne and I am excited about kicking it off with Ms. Tyler.

290Limelite
Editat: des. 18, 2015, 1:22pm

After careful pondering and in an attempt to read my own tomes as much as possible, the following. . .

AAC 2016

January- Anne Tyler Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant (library)
February- Richard Russo Nobody's Fool (library)
March- Jane Smiley A Thousand Acres (e-book)
April- Poetry Month own library
May- Ivan Doig Dancing at the Rascal Fair (e-book)
June- Annie Proulx Brokeback Mountain
July- John Steinbeck TBD
August-Joyce Carol Oates Bellefleur (e-book)
September- John Irving In One Person (e-book)
October- Michael Chabon The Yiddish Policeman's Union (e-book)
November- Annie Dillard TBD
December- Don DeLillo Underworld (e-book)

TBD suggestions gladly welcomed. Read nearly all by Steinbeck and Dillard. Are re-reads allowed?

291laytonwoman3rd
des. 18, 2015, 4:31pm

"Are re-reads allowed?" Goodness, why not? Of course, substitutions are allowed as well. Mark is very lenient!

292kidzdoc
des. 19, 2015, 12:55pm

>291 laytonwoman3rd: Mark is very lenient!

Are you kidding?! Other than Kick Ass Katie, Mark is the toughest person in this group. I think we should name him Hard Ass Mark (HAM).

293weird_O
des. 19, 2015, 12:57pm

>292 kidzdoc: Ah ha ha ha ha ha ha! Best laugh of the day so far, Darryl. Thanks. HAM's gonna love it.

294katiekrug
des. 19, 2015, 6:33pm

>292 kidzdoc: - As one beloved member of the group would say, *SNORK!*

295msf59
des. 20, 2015, 8:08am

Hey! Who's a Hard Ass?? I have been accused of being a "Softie" too! Which one is it?

I do like HAM, though...grins.

296weird_O
des. 20, 2015, 11:31am

Got'er done!

JANUARY: Carson McCullers Heart Is a Lonely Hunter
FEBRUARY: Henry James The Ambassadors
MARCH: Richard Ford Independence Day
APRIL: Louise Erdrich The Plague of Doves
MAY: Sinclair Lewis Dodsworth + Main Street (read in February) + Sinclair Lewis bio (late finish)
JUNE: Wallace Stegner Joe Hill + The Spectator Bird + Wallace Stegner: His Life and Work bio
JULY: Ursula K. Le Guin The Lathe of Heaven
AUGUST: Larry McMurtry The Last Picture Show
SEPTEMBER: Flannery O' Connor Wise Blood
OCTOBER: Ray Bradbury Quicker than the Eye + The Illustrated Man
NOVEMBER: Barbara Kingsolver Pigs in Heaven + The Bean Trees
DECEMBER: E.L. Doctorow The March* + Homer & Langley+The Waterworks (read in April)

MEMORIAL: Kent Haruf Plainsong

*Okay, okay. I'm jumping the gun a little on this book; I still have 60 pages to read.



297msf59
des. 20, 2015, 9:12pm

>296 weird_O: Fantastic job, Bill! I am mighty impressed. You definitely earn a "Purist" button.

298RBeffa
des. 23, 2015, 5:56pm

>297 msf59: Mark, I was so annoyed with myself for not being a purist that I have decided to make amends with my one miss ... Richard Ford. For about the third time I am starting Richard Ford's Canada. I've set aside other reading and will nibble away at this and finish before the year is out. It still isn't my cuppa at page 33 ...

Happy Holidays to you and all the AAC readers. It has been a great 2015 challenge.

299msf59
des. 23, 2015, 6:03pm

Happy Holidays, Ron! I just finished World's Fair, so I completed AACII.

Glad you decided to shoot for a Purity Badge. LOL. Sadly, I had mixed feelings about Canada. I really liked the first half and then it meandered...Many readers loved the book though, so you never know.

300kac522
Editat: des. 26, 2015, 1:28am

I thought I would post my less-than-successful AAC final list, for those of us who didn't quite win the Purity Badge. I had some time to catch up in December. Here's how I ended up (with the month finished):

Jan: Carson McCullers, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter ✔ Jan 2015
Feb:
Mar:
Apr: Louise Erdrich, Original Fire (poems) ✔ Dec 2015
May: Sinclair Lewis, Babbitt ✔ May 2015
Jun: Wallace Stegner, Joe Hill ✔ Jul 2015
Jul: Ursula Le Guin, A Wizard of Earthsea ✔ Jul 2015
Aug:
Sep: Flannery O'Connor, 7 stories from The Complete Stories ✔ Dec 2015
Oct: Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451 ✔ Dec 2015
Nov:
Dec: E. L. Doctorow, Ragtime ✔ Jul 2015

Ragtime was my favorite read of this group; Babbitt the most disappointing (I had loved Main Street); Fahrenheit 451 made me think the most; and Joe Hill just made me mad.

I still have some TBRs on my shelf for Henry James, Barbara Kingsolver and that frightful tome everyone loves (Lonesome Dove), which I hope to tackle in 2016.

Thanks for a great challenge, Mark, and you will se me in & out in 2016. I've read most of the 2016 authors, but will join you for those I haven't read yet.

301maggie1944
des. 26, 2015, 8:59am

Hey, HAM, although I completely bailed out on the AAC2015 I have tried to continue reading the threads, and now I have my reward! I learned your new good name, and so happy new year to you, dear HAM.

302msf59
des. 26, 2015, 10:37pm



The Anne Tyler AAC thread is up: http://www.librarything.com/topic/209590

^Sorry, I do not have the new Group Discussion thread up, for the AACIII, but I will soon.

303msf59
des. 26, 2015, 10:39pm

>300 kac522: 8 out of 12, ain't bad, Kathy! No badge, but who cares, right? Hope to see you next year.

>301 maggie1944: Hey! Who you calling a HAM? Huh?

304msf59
Editat: des. 27, 2015, 9:15am



^Okay, who earned one of these?

And if you didn't, remember everyone else gets one of these:



^And there is nothing wrong with that. I appreciate everyone, at least giving it a try. See? I am not exactly a HAM!!

305msf59
des. 27, 2015, 9:14am

I had a good AAC year. It wasn't filled with stellar reads but there were some worthy titles. I think The Plague of Doves & Pigs in Heaven were my favorites. I expected more from Beyond the Hundredth Meridian but I did not dislike it. I think it was more of a NF title, of it's time. The Dispossessed didn't exactly ring all my bells either, but I will consider rereading it in print one of these days. Maybe the audio was just not the right fit. I was pleased with Babbitt too and will read more Lewis and I want to reread the next Bascombe book, Independence Day, hopefully early next year.

306maggie1944
des. 27, 2015, 11:30am

Ok, you are right! Not HAM at all, your hosting the AAC has been very supportive, tolerant, and encouraging and I thank you!

307lindapanzo
des. 27, 2015, 11:36am

I finished 6 of the AAC authors this year. I'd hoped for more but most of them were new to me and ones I hope to read more of, especially Doctorow and McMurtry.

January: Carson McCullers, The Ballad of the Sad Cafe--FINISHED
February: Henry James, Daisy Miller--FINISHED
March: Richard Ford, The Sportswriter--FINISHED

August: Larry McMurtry--The Last Picture Show--FINISHED

October: Ray Bradbury, Dandelion Wine--FINISHED

December: E.L. Doctorow, Ragtime--FINISHED

308msf59
des. 27, 2015, 12:36pm

>306 maggie1944: I feel better now, Karen. Thanks! Smiles...

>307 lindapanzo: You did good, Linda! I hope you can join us again, for a few next year.

309nittnut
Editat: des. 27, 2015, 1:48pm

Reporting - I did it! I am very pleased with my year with the AAC. It's been a blast. And half the authors I had never read before, so I'm feeling rather accomplished. Lol
Thanks Mark (HAM) for managing all this. It's a lot of work and you do a great job. I'm looking forward to next year.

January - Carson McCullers - The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (audio)
February - Henry James- The Wings of the Dove
March - Richard Ford - Wildlife
April - Louise Erdrich- The Roundhouse
May - Sinclair Lewis- Main Street
June - Wallace Stegner- American Places OTS
July - Ursula K. Le Guin - Lavinia
August - Larry McMurtry- Lonesome Dove OTS
September - Flannery O' Connor- A Good Man is Hard To Find
October - Ray Bradbury- Green Shadows, White Whale
November - Barbara Kingsolver- Prodigal Summer
December - E.L. Doctorow- Sweet Land Stories

310cbl_tn
des. 27, 2015, 2:29pm

I managed to read an AAC author most months, and my top read for the year was an AAC book, Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner. Here's what I managed to read for the year:

January - Carson McCullers - The Member of the Wedding
February - Henry James - Daisy Miller
March - Richard Ford
April - Louise Erdrich - The Master Butchers Singing Club
May - Sinclair Lewis - Main Street
June - Wallace Stegner - Angle of Repose
July - Ursula K. LeGuin - Catwings series
August - Larry McMurtry
September - Flannery O'Connor
October - Ray Bradbury - Something Wicked This Way Comes
November - Barbara Kingsolver - The Lacuna
December - E. L. Doctorow

311laytonwoman3rd
Editat: gen. 1, 2016, 4:50pm

Well, I think I get about a 93% on the 2015 AAC Challenge:

January Carson McCullers -- The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
February Henry James --The Aspern Papers
March Richard Ford -- Canada
April Louise Erdrich -- The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse
May Sinclair Lewis -- Dodsworth DNF
June Wallace Stegner -- Angle of Repose
July Ursula K. Le Guin Skipped
August Larry McMurtry -- Crazy Horse
Sept. Flannery O' Connor -- Wise Blood
October Ray Bradbury -- "The April Witch"; "Pillar of Fire"; Dandelion Wine
November Barbara Kingsolver -- Animal, Vegetable, Miracle
December E.L. Doctorow -- Sweet Land Stories

EDIT: I also read Our Souls at Night for the Kent Haruf tribute in the last two days of the year. I still can't give myself full marks, since I totally skipped LeGuin, but maybe I'll up my score to 98%, and I'm very happy with that.

312EBT1002
Editat: des. 27, 2015, 5:33pm

313lkernagh
des. 28, 2015, 11:25am

No purity award here but I did manage to read 8 books for the AACII:

January - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers -
February - The Aspern Papers by Henry James -
March - Wildlife by Richard Ford -
April - Shadow Tag by Louise Erdrich -
May - Main Street by Sinclair Lewis -
June - Remembering Laughter by Wallace Stegner -
August - The Last Kind Words Saloon by Larry McMurtry -
October - Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury -

314jnwelch
des. 28, 2015, 11:53am

I was a bit hit and miss with the AAC, but it did bring me some topnotch reads, including Lonesome Dove, The Bean Trees, The Round House, The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and World's Fair.

Thank you, Mark!

315BekkaJo
des. 28, 2015, 11:53am

No purity award for me either - but I thoroughly enjoyed the ones I read :)

Carson McCullers The Heart is a lonely Hunter
Richard Ford Independence Day
Louise Erdrich Love Medicine
Sinclair Lewis Dodsworth
Ursula Le Guin The Dispossesed
Larry McMurtry Lonesome Dove
Flannery O'Connor Wise blood
Ray Bradbury Fahrenheit 451

I think that Lonesome Dove was my favourite. Saying that and looking at this list now I did actually love all of them! Here's to AAC3.

316brenpike
Editat: des. 28, 2015, 2:40pm

I think I am eligible for a Purity Award :/ LeGuin tripped me up in July, but I did complete one of her short stories.

Carson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
Henry James - Washington Square, The Turn of the Screw
Richard Ford - Canada
Louise Erdrich - The Birchbark House, Game of Silence, The Porcupine Year, Chickadee, The Master Butchers Singing Club
Sinclair Lewis - Main Street, Elmer Gantry
Wallace Stegner - The Big Rock Candy Mountain
Ursula K LeGuin - 50 pages of Always Coming Home, short story Ile Forest
Larry McMurtry - The Last Kind Words Saloon
Flannery O'Connor - Everything That Rises Must Converge
Ray Bradbury - Farenheit 451
Barbara Kingsolver - Pigs in Heaven
E.L. Doctorow - Homer & Langley

Kent Haruf - Our Souls At Night

Ready for AAC III
Thanks Mark!

317Tara1Reads
des. 28, 2015, 4:11pm

January: Carson McCullers - Clock Without Hands Completed
February: Henry James - What Maisie Knew Completed
March: Richard Ford - Wildlife and Women With Men Completed
April: Louise Erdrich - The Painted Drum Completed in January
May: Sinclair Lewis
June: Wallace Stegner - Crossing to Safety Completed in September
July: Ursula K. LeGuin
August: Larry McMurtry - Terms of Endearment Completed
September: Flannery O'Connor
October: Ray Bradbury
November: Barbara Kingsolver - Flight Behavior Completed in December
December: E.L. Doctorow

58% completion. I love Sinclair Lewis but I was busy in May and didn't read any books at all and just never got back to him. I was willing to try E.L. Doctorow but I won't be able to squeeze him in in the last few days of 2015. I am not sad about skipping out on Le Guin or Bradbury. I did check a Le Guin book out of the library and read the first few pages, but I wasn't interested enough to finish it. I also read and enjoyed the first 10-12 pages of a book by Flannery O'Connor but for whatever reason didn't feel like continuing with it at that time, but I will try to pick it up again in the future.

318msf59
des. 28, 2015, 7:56pm

Go Brenda! Go Brenda!

Once again, I am so impressed, that many of you have gave this Challenge so much consideration. I know we all have ridiculous TBR stacks, along with our own reading interests, so finding time to fit these authors in, is never easy and proves your dedication.

I salute you, Purity Badge or not!

319brenpike
des. 29, 2015, 12:44am

>318 msf59:. Thanks Mark!

320RBeffa
des. 31, 2015, 2:29pm

I was so close I needed to fix and finish so I stayed up until somewhere around 2 in the morning reading Richard Ford's Canada to finish it. It is a strange book. The slowest most repetitive book I can ever recall reading. I think I'd rate it around 2 1/2 stars which for me is what I'd rate an OK rather average read. It is however anything but average. If you read a bunch of reviews here and on goodreads you'll see the range of reactions from 1 star to 5. It took me quite a long time to get used to Ford's odd pace with this novel. I'm not sure why we had to be told everything 10 or 20 times, or more. When I was perhaps a quarter done and ready to bail on this yet again (I'd attempted this one before) I did something I very rarely do now (but which my wife does all the time to decide if she should continue an iffy story) ... I turned to the back of the book and read perhaps the last 25 pages, which is neatly tucked into a segment as Part 3. So I saw where we were going and it didn't spoil this book in the least because it is that kind of book. So I read this and I don't regret it, but it is one odd book. It is also rather sad and melancholy.

January - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter Carson McCullers finished 1/16/15
February - The Lesson of the Master Henry James finished 2/18/15
March - substitute for Richard Ford: In My Father's House by Ernest J Gaines finished 3/18/15
Richard Ford: Canada finished Dec 31, 2015
April - Tracks Louise Erdrich finished March 31, 2015
May - Sinclair Lewis- Kingsblood Royal finished May 5, 2015
June - Wallace Stegner Angle of Repose finished June 19, 2015
July - Ursula K. Le Guin Rocannon's World finished July 1, 2015, Planet of Exile finished July 3, 2015, City of Illusions finished July 23, 2015
August - Larry McMurtry - Streets of Laredo finished August 8, 2015
September - Flannery O' Connor- A Good Man Is Hard To Find finished Sept 25, 2015
October - Ray Bradbury- read The October Country, Farewell Summer, Summer Morning Summer Night and others through the month
November - Barbara Kingsolver- Homeland and other stories finished Nov 20, 2015
December - E.L. Doctorow- The March finished Nov 30, 2015 Homer and Langley finished Dec 4, 2015

AAC Tribute author: Where You Once Belonged by Kent Haruf, finished June 26, 2015