Streamsong's Chosen by Books - Part 3 - Always More

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Streamsong's Chosen by Books - Part 3 - Always More

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1streamsong
nov. 6, 2015, 9:18am



Painting by Rance Hood.

Winter has arrived. We've had snow here in the valley this week

And the painting put me in mind of a poem by Salish poet Victor A. Charlo in his book Put Sey (Good Enough )

Agnes Again

She teaches so I won't forget.
She sings sore-footed horse's song
who says, "I'll be alright and we'll
travel again." She digs bitterroot
so that the children and grandchildren
will know how to use the root for better
times. The song remains in my mind.

I would travel with sore-footed horse as he sings
of better times. We would run with wind
catch stars when buffalo crowd clouds.

2streamsong
Editat: nov. 6, 2015, 9:20am

I am a fifty-plus microbiology technician in an NIH research lab. (Nope, I don't work on Ebola although others at this location do so).

I live in a beautiful creek bottom in Western Montana along with horses, a middle aged Golden Retriever, and a couple cats. I am lucky enough to be surrounded by spectacular scenery and lots of wildlife. I have two grown children.

I'll probably read about a hundred books again this year. I tend to read about 50/50 fiction and nonfiction with a few graphic novels and books of poetry thrown into the mix



3streamsong
Editat: gen. 1, 2016, 10:37am

CURRENTLY READING

I usually have way too many books going at the same time.



- Kristin Lavransdatter III: The Cross - Sigrid Undset - 1922 - ROOT acquired 2008 = 7 ROOT points; 1001
- The Mockingbird Next Door - Marja Mills -
- Shock Doctrine - Naomi Klein - 2007; RL book club; acquired 2015

A Read-All-of Austen's' major works this year challenge:

COMPLETED! Although I still need to read the final section on Persuasion from Bitch In a Bonnet: Reclaiming Jane Austen from the Stiffs, the Snobs, the Simps and the Saps (Volume 2) by Robert Rodi





and a very slow read of N. T. Wright's Christian Origins and the Question of God - now onto volume 2: Jesus and the Victory of God


These are partially finished and while not bad, I may not get back to them:

- Born to Be Good - Dacher Keltner -MOOC - purchased 2015 (2009)
- The How of Happiness - Sonja Lyubomirsky for MOOC; purchased 2015 (2007)
- A Place of My Own - Michael Pollen - ROOT 2010 (pub 1998)

And here's my list of

Recently Finished but not Reviewed:



102. - The Bridal Wreath - Sigrid Undset - 1920 - tioli #12: Read a work of fiction by a woman or women which was not written in English ROOT # 2008
103. - Junkyard Dogs - Craig Johnson - 2010; Craig Johnson group read; TIOLI #3: Read a book that that has no red or green whatsoever on the front cover ; audiobook, library
104. The Wife - Sigrid Undset - TIOLI #9: Read a book with the color blue on the cover or the word blue somewhere in the title; ROOT #45/50; acquired 2008 = 7 ROOT points = 174/200
105. Collapse - Jared Diamond - 2005 - started reading in 2014 - finally finished! ROOT # 46/50; acquired 2008; = 7 ROOT points 181/200
106. The Cat and the Tao - Kwong Kuen Shan - 2002 - ROOT #47/50; acquired 2007 = 8 ROOT points 189/200
107. Gilead - Marilynne Robinson - TIOLI ##18: Read a book written by a famous/prolific author, one whose books you've never tried reading before; ROOT #48/50 from 2013 = 2 ROOT points 191/200, audiobook & print

Link to last 2014 thread: http://www.librarything.com/topic/182482

4streamsong
Editat: des. 27, 2015, 12:32pm

Reading Our Own Tomes (ROOTS) Challenge

I am becoming buried in mountains of unread books so this year I'll plan to read 50 - 75 books off my shelves acquired before January 1, 2015. This is incredibly hard to do with all the great reading everyone here does. I visit a thread, read a great review and a new book or three makes it to my house.




To keep myself in the oldest part of the Planet of Neglected Books, I'm giving myself points for each book I read, with older books getting more points.

Here's how it works:

1. ROOTS cataloged into LT in 2006 --9 points
2. ROOTS cataloged into LT in 2007--8 points
3. ROOTS cataloged into LT in 2008--7 points
4. ROOTS cataloged into LT in 2009--6 points
5. ROOTS cataloged into LT in 2010--5 points
6 .ROOTS cataloged into LT in 2011 --4 points
7. ROOTS cataloged into LT in 2012 -3 points
8. ROOTS cataloged into LT in 2013 - 2 points
9. ROOTS cataloged into LT in 2014 - 1 point
10. ROOTS not previously entered into LT but which have been around the house pre-2014 (many of these are pre-2006)--1 point

The goal this year is 200 points.




New This Year Each month I'm going to put the total number of books in my unread collection into a Random Number Generator and have it generate a number to choose one book that I might not (or might have!) chosen to read this year.

One Book a Month from MT TBR Chosen by a Random Number Generator:

✔ January: Honeymoon - James Patterson - Total in tbr collection: 453. RNG- 186. (ROOT 2008; Pub 2005)
✔ February: Total in tbr collection: 447. RNG - 50 Cosmos - Carl Sagan (ROOT 2007; Pub 1980 )
✔ March Beyond the Far Ridge: Pioneering in the Rocky Mountain High Country by Edward Mark McGough Total in tbr collection: 453. RNG= 171. (ROOT 2008; Pub 1991).
✔ April Total in TBR collection: 447; RNG: 231 The Guru of Love - Samrat Upadhyay (ROOT 2008, Published 2003)
✔ May Total in TBR collection: 448: RNG 299 A Light in the Window - Jan Karon - ROOT 2012, Published 1996)
Total in TBR collection: 448 RNG 206 Mort - Terry Pratchett - 1987 - Funny! This one was already on my shortlist to read! ROOT 2008 = 7 ROOT points
July: Total in TBR collection: 449; RNG 427: Immigrant Women in the Land of Dollars: Life and Culture on the Lower East Side 1890-1925 (New Feminist Library) - Elizabeth Ewen - ROOT added to 2014 (acquired earlier)
✔ August : Total in TBR collection 450: RNG= 253/450 = Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon - ROOT 2011 = 4 ROOT points - listened to audio from llibrary
September Total in TBR collection: 448: RNG 321 = The Center of the Cyclone (An Autobiography of Inner Space) - John C Lilly - 1972 - ROOT 2008 - 7 ROOT points
October Total in TBR collection: 447: RNG 100 = The Different Drum: Community Making and Peace - M. Scott Peck - 1987 - ROOT - 7 ROOT points
November Total in TBR collection: 460: RNG 67 = Petals on the River - Kathleen Woodiwiss - ROOT 2007 = 8 ROOT points
December Total in TBR collection : 462: RNG 41 =It's Not About the Horse - Wyatt Webb - ROOT 2007 = 8 ROOT points

5streamsong
Editat: nov. 6, 2015, 9:31am

BOOKS READ First Quarter

January


1.Honeymoon - James Patterson Random Number Generator Book; Jan TIOLI #17. Read a book by an author who you've tried before but whose writing did not impress ; ROOT 2008 = 7/200 ROOT points
2. Barren Grounds: The Story of the Tragic Moffatt Canoe Trip - Skip Pessl LTER ROOT 2014 - 1 ROOT point = 8/200
3. Rabbit, Run - John Updike - audiobook in the car; 1001 Books; 2014 American Author challenge; Jan TIOLI #4. Read a book you were supposed to read in 2014, but didn't; library;
4. Daring Greatly - Brene Brown - TIOLI #1 Read a book that has the word "psychological" followed by a noun somewhere in or on the book; ROOT 2014 = 1 ROOT point 9/200
5. Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro - January British Authors challenge; TIOLI #Challenge #10: IOU challenge: Read a book by someone whose name ends in I, O, or U; ROOT 2012 (3 ROOT points = 12/200)
6. Haggai Zechariah Malachi People's Bible Commentary - Eric S Hartzell Personal reading through the Bible with commentary challenge; ROOT #5/50 purchased pre-2006 = 9 ROOT points = 21/200 points
7. Moon Tiger - Penelope Lively - British author challenge; January TIOLI #1: Read a book that has the word "psychological" followed by a noun somewhere in or on the book (psychological version p 90) ;library
8. - The Cow in the Parking Lot: A Zen Approach to Overcoming Anger by Susan Edmiston, Leonard Scheff; library
9. - Winter Wheat- Mildred Walker- RL bookclub; Jan TIOLI #18. Read a book that includes a word or phrase in title or name that puts you in mind of the season; purchased 2015
10. The Heart is a Lonely Hunter - Carson McCullers - January American Authors Challenge; TIOLI #12: Begin with a Song: Read a book whose title is also a song title or whose title is a riff on a song title; audiobook in the car; library
11. Blue Horses: Poems - Mary Oliver

February

12. Habibi - Craig Thompson - Feb TIOLI # #13: Rolling Challenge: Read a book which title starts with the letters H, A, R, or T; graphic novel, library
13. Beijing Bastard: Into the Wilds of a Changing China - Val Wang - LibraryThing Early Reviewers; Feb TIOLI #8 Read a book with something you could love in the title; ROOT 2014 (#6/50) = 1 ROOT point (22/200)
14. Saga Vol 1 - Brian K. Vaughan,Fiona Staples - Fantasy February; TIOLI #22 : Read a book whose opening line is a question; Library
15. Cress - Marissa Meyer - Fantasy February - audiobook from library
16. Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness - Alexandra Fuller - RL Bookclub; Feb TIOLI # 16 - Read a book with a U, V or W in the title; purchased 2015
17. Tehran Noir - Salar Abdoh - LTER; Feb TIOLI #13. Read a book which title starts with the letters H, A, R, or T; Global Reading - Iran; ROOT #7/50 acquired 2014 = 1 ROOT point (23/200)
18. Cosmos - Carl Sagan - Monthly Random Number Generator Book; Feb TIOLI # 15. Read a book that has something to do with time; ROOT 2007 # 8/50 cataloged 2007 - 8 points (31/200)

March
19. Saga, Vol Two - Brian K. Vaughan,Fiona Staples - TIOLI #13 Read a book that acknowledges the book designer or cover artist; library
20. Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh - February BAC;1001 Books; March TIOLI #17. Read a book with "ides" in the title or the 15th book in a series; audiobook from library
21. Brown Girl Dreaming - Jaqueline Woodson - TIOLI #5: Read a book about change; US States challenge South Carolina; library
22. A Map of Betrayal - Ha Jin - LTER Rec'd Feb 2015; TIOLI #11. Read a book with something you should beware of in the title; audiobook
23. Underground Girls of Kabul - Jenny Nordberg - reread for RL BC 3/26; TIOLI #2. Read a book whose title includes the name of a country other than the one in which you currently reside; ROOT #9/50; Acquired 2014 = 1 ROOT point
24. Disco for the Departed - Colin Cotterill - March TIOLI #3 Read the Third book in a series; ROOT 2014 #10/50; 1 ROOT point 33/200; pub 2006
25. Beyond the Far Ridge - Edward Mark McGough - March Random Number Generator book; ROOT #11/50: 2008 = 7 points - total 40/200
26. - Mansfield Park - Jane Austen - Read all the Austens in 2015 group challenge; tutored read; 1001 books; library (1814)

6streamsong
Editat: nov. 6, 2015, 9:31am

BOOKS READ Second Quarter

April

27. The Painted Veil - W. Somerset Maugham - (1934) - BAC, audiobook, TIOLI #11: Read a book with a four-letter word in the title , Hong Kong/China, library
28. Stone Mattress - Margaret Atwood - (2014) - Atwood April; TIOLI #11 Read a book with a cover you love; library
29. Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats - T. S. Eliot - (1939) - April National Poetry Month; ROOT #12/50; acquired 2014 = 1 ROOT point 41/200
30. Fingersmith - Sarah Waters - (2002) - Feb BAC; 1001; April TIOLI #4. Read a book whose title or author includes a job title or occupation; library
31. Death Without Company - Craig Johnson (2006) - Johnson/Hillerman group read; TIOLI #2 something to do with green (cover); audiobook in the car; library;
32. General Epistles: People's Bible Commentary - Mark A. Jeske -(Rev ed 2005) ROOT #13 /50; acquired 2014 = 1 ROOT point - 42/200
33 & 34. Dreams For Sale (1933) and The Cock-Eyed Muse (1929) by Frank C Tillson. ROOTS # 14 & 15/50. Both acquired from Dad's library, 2014 = 1 ROOT point each for 44/200.
35. A Tale for the Time Being - (2013) - Ruth Ozeki - RLBC - TIOLI #11: Read a book with a four-letter word in the title; purchased 2015
36. Pride and Prejudice (Norton Critical Edition) - Jane Austen - Read all the Austens in 2015 group challenge; (1813); TIOLI#19: Read a book which has an 'and' in the middle of the title ROOT #16/50; 2013 - 2 ROOT points - 46/200
37. Gandhi My Autobiography - Mohatma Gandhi -(1925) Reading globally Indian subcontinent; Apr TIOLI #6: Read a book in which a government (or agency) plays a major role ; ROOT#17/50 2013; = 2 ROOT points = 48/200

May
38. Missoula - Jon Krakauer - 2015 - TIOLI #14. Read a book about systemic oppression (shared read); purchased 2015
39. Castle Rackrent - Maria Edgeworth - 1800 - group read, 1001, acquired 2015
40. Deuteronomy (People's Bible Commentary) - Mark E Braun - 1995 - Personal Bible Reading Challenge; ROOT #18; purchased pre 2006 = 9 ROOT points 57/200
41. Canada - Richard Ford - Feb AAC; May TIOLI #9. Read a book that you started in April, 2015, but did not finish; audiobook in the car - library
42. Ezra/Nehemiah/Esther (People's Bible Commentary Series) - John F. Brug - 1994 - Personal Bible Reading Challenge; ROOT #19/50; acquired pre 2006= 9 ROOT points = 66/200
43. Psalms II (People's Bible Commentary Series) - John F Brug - 1992 - Personal Bible Reading Challenge; ROOT #20/50; acquired pre-2006 = 9 ROOT points = 75/200
44. Ecclesiastes/Song of Songs (People's Bible Commentary Series) - Roland Cap Ehlke - 1992 - Personal Bible Reading Challenge; ROOT #21/50; acquired pre-2006 = 9 ROOT points = 84/200
45. The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse - Louise Erdrich -2001 - April AAC; ROOT #22/50; acquired 2011 = 4 ROOT points 88/200
46. Revelation (People's Bible Commentary) - Wayne D. Mueller 1996 - Personal Bible Reading Challenge; ROOT #23/50; acquired pre 2006 = 9 ROOT points 97/200
47. All the Light We Cannot See - Anthony Doerr - 2014 - Real Life Book Club; May TIOLI #5: Read a Book with a Sentimental Dedication; purchased 2015
48. Acts (People's Bible Commentary Series) - Richard D. Balge - 1996 - Last book of personal Bible/Commentary challenge. ROOT #24/50 pre=2006 = 9 ROOT points 106/200.
49. Let Sleeping Dogs Lie - Rita Mae Brown -2014 - LTER; May Murder & Mayhem; May TIOLI # 6. Read a book with a list of characters at the front; ROOT 2014

June
50. Main Street - Sinclair Lewis - 1920 - May AAC; June TIOLI #6. Read a book with a summery cover; audiobook, library; Reading the states: Minnesota
51. The Upstairs Wife: An Intimate History of Pakistan - Rafia Zakaria - 2015 - LTER - TIOLI #4. Read a book with your 6th and/or 15th most popular/used tags (15th, history); Global Challenge: Pakistan
52. A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess - 1962; June BAC; 1001; TIOLI #10. Read a book by an author who shares a name with your father or grandfather; audiobook in the car; finished 6/17/2015
53. Travels with Epicurus: A Journey to a Greek Island in Search of a Fulfilled Life - Daniel Klein - 2012- Real Life Book Club; TIOLI #6: Read a book with a summery cover; Global Readiing: Greece; purchased 2015
54. I Thought It Was Just Me (but it isn't): Making the Journey from "What Will People Think?" to "I Am Enough" - Brene Brown - TIOLI # 13. Read a book that has a punctuation mark and/or a symbol in the title; purchased 2015
55. Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen Read-all-of-Jane-Austen-this-year; 1001; TIOLI#17. Read a book that was published by Oxford World's Classics ; ROOT 2014 (#26/50) = 1 ROOT point = 108/200

7streamsong
Editat: nov. 7, 2015, 10:54am

BOOKS READ Third Quarter

JULY
56. Angle of Repose - Wallace Stegner - 1971 - June AAC; ROOT 2014 = 1 ROOT point; TIOLI #14: Read a book with the author is associated with California
57. - A Light in the Window - Jan Karon - 1995 - May Random Number generator #299/ 448 TBR's; ROOT # 27/50; acquired 2012 = 3 ROOT points (112/200); July TIOLI#12: Read A Book That Was Originally Published Before the Year 2000; audio
58. At the Mountains of Madness and Other Tales of Terror - H.P. Lovecraft - 1936 - TIOLI #4. Read a work by an individual mentioned in the Science Fiction Awards Database ; 1001 - group read - acquired 2015
59. Bitch In a Bonnet: Reclaiming Jane Austen From the Stiffs, the Snobs, the Simps and the Saps (Volume 1) - Robert Rodi - 2010- TIOLI #5. Read a book with a title that could drive you to drink - purchased 2015
60. The Predator Paradox: Ending the War with Wolves, Bears, Cougars, and Coyotes - John Shivik - 2015 - LTER - TIOLI #15. Read a Book with a W in the title
61.- Kindness Goes Unpunished - Craig Johnson -2007 - audiobook, library
62. The Children Act - Ian McEwan - 2014 - RL book club; TIOLI #17. Read a book LibraryThing thinks you should borrow; purchased 2015
63. To the Lighthouse - Virginia Woolf - 1927; July British Author Challenge; 1001, TIOLI # 2. Read a book with a connection to water; ROOT #29/50) acquired 2013 = 2 ROOT points (114/200)

AUGUST
64. Silence - Shusaku Endo - 1966 - 1001 July group read;Read a book whose title starts with, in rolling order, letters in the word SMILE; library
65. Rock With Wings - Anne Hillerman - 2015 - TIOLI #3. Read a work featuring a character from folklore (Navajo skinwalker); State challenge: Arizona; library
66. Emma - Jane Austen - 1815 - Read-all-of-Jane-Austen-in-a-year group read; 1001; ROOT #30/50 from 2014 = 1 ROOT point (115/200) audio from library
67. The Theft of Memory: Losing My Father, One Day at a Time - Jonathan Kozol -2015- LTER; TIOLI # 1. Read a book with an insect named on page 33 (am Attend***ant*** helped) - acquired 2015
68. - Boone's Lick - Larry McMurtry - 2000 - American Author Challenge; August TIOLI #1 Read a book with an insect named on page 33 (I believe there's a p'ant'her around) - audiobook in the car; library
69. The Guru of Love - Samrat Upadhyay - 2003 - April Random Number Generator: RNG: 231/447; TIOLI #8. Read a book whose title includes a reference to an unusual, offbeat, quirky or archaic profession or pastime; ROOT 2008 = 7 ROOT points; Global Reading Challenge: Nepal
70. The Quiet American - Graham Greene - BAC - 1955; TIOLI #19. Read a book whose author's first and last names begin with the same letter; Global Reading Challenge: Vietnam; audiobook in the car
71. A Conneticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court - Mark Twain - 1889 - Real Life Book Club; TIOLI # 12. Read a book published prior to April 1972 -shared read - (Edition owned by my Aunt Clara. Part of a set published 1917). ROOT #32/50; 2013 = 2 ROOT points 122/200
72. Evelina - Frances Burney - 1778 - Group Read; 1001; August TIOLI #6. Read a book which fits a category of the Seattle Public Library's Summer Book Bingo; purchased 2015

SEPTEMBER
73. Go Set a Watchman - Harper Lee - 2015; September series and sequels (?); Sept TIOLI #15. Read a book that blurbs the author on the cover; state challenge: Alabama; library
74. Fairest - Melissa Meyer -2015; September series and sequels; September Take It or Leave It #19: Read a book that has the word "story" in the title; audiobook in the car - library
75. Another Man's Moccasins - Craig Johnson - 2008 - September series & sequels; August Longmire group read; TIOLI #20. Read a book in a series; library
76. Fatal Deception - Michael Bowker - 2013 - TIOLI #13: Read a book which contains the word 'September", 'Sept' or 'Ember' in the narrative - audiobook acquired 2015
77. The Dispossessed - Ursula Le Guin - 1974 - July AAC; Sept TIOLI #22. Read a book you added to a previous TIOLI challenge, but never read; 1001; library
78. 2001: A Space Odyssey - Arthur C. Clarke - 1968 - reread, ROOT #33/50; 2013 = 2 ROOT points - 124/200; 1001 (not counted since it's a reread;) audiobook in the car
79. Good Enough - Viktor Charlo - 2008 - purchased 2015
80. Midaq Alley - Naguib Mahfouz - 1947 -1001; TIOLI #5. Read a book whose title includes something you might find on a map; library

8streamsong
Editat: des. 28, 2015, 9:36am

BOOKS READ Final Quarter

OCTOBER READING
81. Mort - Terry Pratchett - June Random Number Generator book; ROOT 2008 = 7 ROOT points; October TIOLI #3. Read a book whose title contains no repeated letters
82. Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury - 1953 - October AAC; TIOLI #1 Read a book whose author's last name contains a three-letter combination which is an English word if spelled backward; library
83. Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon - 2001 - August Random Number Generator Book; ROOT #35/50; acquired 2011 = 4 ROOT points (135/200); listened to audio from library
84. The Halloween Tree - Ray Bradbury - 1972 - Halloween Reads; American Author Challenge; Take It or Leave It #1 - Read a book whose author's last name contains a three-letter combination which is an English word if spelled backward; library; audiobook
85. Astoria: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson's Lost Pacific Empire: A Story of Wealth, Ambition, and Survival - Peter Stark - 2014; RLBC;Take It or Leave It #1 - Read a book whose author's last name contains a three-letter combination which is an English word if spelled backward; purchased 2015
86. Northanger Abbey - Jane Austen - 1817 - Austen-In-A-Year Challenge; 1001; TIOLI # 6. Read a book where a word in the title starts with any of the six central letters of the English alphabet K,L,M,N,O, or P; ROOT #36/50; acquired 2014 = 1 ROOT point (136/200)
87. - Waiting for Willa - Dorothy Eden - 1970 - ROOT#37/50 from 2013 = 2 ROOT points (138/200); TIOLI #19. Read a book which mentions a Scandinavian capital, in rolling order (Stockholm)
88. Ghost Stories of the Old West - Dan Asfar - 2003 - Halloween Reads; TIOLI #15. Read a book with a "scary word" in the title or author's name; ROOT#38/50; acquired 2013 = 2 ROOT points (140/200)
89. The Dark Horse - Craig Johnson - Longmire group read; TIOLI #17: Read a book where one (and only one) of the title words has 4 letters; audiobook from library

NOVEMBER READING
90. Feynman - Jim Ottaviani - 2011; TIOLI #8: Read a book with red on the cover; graphic non-fiction; library
91. Nimona - Noelle Stevenson - 2015 - graphic novel; TIOLI #5. Read a Fantasy; library
92. Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster - Svetlana Alexievich - 2006 - Nobel winner; Global Challenge: Belarus; TIOLI #14: Read a book that was first published at the end of a war; library
93. H is for Hawk - Helen Macdonald - 2014 ; TIOLI #15. Read a memoir or autobiography by a creative woman; audiobook; library
94. Animal Dreams - Barbara Kingsolver - 1990 - AAC; Global Reading Challenge: Niceragua; ROOT #39/50; 2003 = 2 ROOT points =142/200
95. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: A Novel - Muriel Spark - 1961 - BAC; 1001; TIOLI # 10
96. The Children's Story - James Clavell - 1963 - TIOLI # 17 has the phrase inside the book "Don't be afraid"; ROOT #40/50; not previously cataloged = 1 ROOT point = 143/200
97. Rising Strong - Brene Brown - 2015 - LTER - TIOLI #1 Read a book whose author's name contains a mark other than plain English letters; 2015

DECEMBER
98. Girl Waits With Gun - Amy Stewart - 2015 - LTER ; TIOLI #14: Finish a book you started before 01/Dec/15
99. Persuasion - Jane Austen - 1817 - Read Jane Austen in a year challenge; audiobook; 1001 (reread); ROOT #41/50; acquired 2008 = 7 ROOT points = 149/200
100. Where Angels Go: Shirley, Goodness & Mercy are Back - Debbie Macomber - 2007 - TIOLI #5. Read a funny book about a holiday ROOT# 42/50; acq'd 2013 = 2 ROOT points; 151/200
101. A Guide to Navajo Sandpaintings - Mark Bahti - 2000 - TIOLI # 16. Read a book of nonfiction;ROOT# 43/50; acquired 2006 = 9 ROOT points - 160/200
102. - The Bridal Wreath - Sigrid Undset - 1920 - TIOLI #12: Read a work of fiction by a woman or women which was not written in English ROOT #44/50; acquired 2008 = 7 ROOT points (167/200)
103. Junkyard Dogs - Craig Johnson - 2010; Craig Johnson group read; TIOLI #3: Read a book that that has no red or green whatsoever on the front cover ; audiobook, library
104. The Wife - Sigrid Undset - TIOLI #9: Read a book with the color blue on the cover or the word blue somewhere in the title; ROOT #45/50; acquired 2008 = 7 ROOT points - 174/200)
105. Collapse - Jared Diamond - 2005 - started reading in 2014 - finally finished! ROOT # 46/50; acquired 2008; = 7 ROOT points 181/200
106. The Cat and the Tao -Kwong Kuen Shan - 2002 - ROOT #47/50; acquired 2007 = 8 ROOT points 189/200

9streamsong
Editat: des. 31, 2015, 12:58pm

FAVORITE BOOKS READ IN 2015


- Angle of Repose - Wallace Stegner
- Silence - Shusaku Endo


- Stone Mattress - Margaret Atwood - short stories
- Moon Tiger - Penelope Lively
- Nimona - Noelle Stevenson - graphic novel
- Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
- Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen

Nonfiction:
- Rising Strong - Brene Brown
- Brown Girl Dreaming - Jacqueline Woodson
- Bitch In a Bonnet: Reclaiming Jane Austen From the Stiffs, the Snobs, the Simps and the Saps (Volume 1) - Robert Rodi
- Underground Girls of Kabul - Jenny Nordberg - Reread - Just as good the second time around!
- Voices from Chernobyl - Svetlana Alexievich - 2006
- Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town by Jon Krakauer
- Astoria: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson's Lost Pacific Empire: A Story of Wealth, Ambition, and Survival - Peter Stark



****************************
STATISTICS FOR BOOKS READ IN 2015
**********************************

***** 106 -TOTAL BOOKS COMPLETED IN 2015 ****


Of the books I've read this year:

8 - cataloged into LT 2006 or before
2 - cataloged into LT 2007
8 - cataloged into LT 2008
- cataloged into LT 2009
- cataloged into LT 2010
2 - cataloged into LT 2011
2 - cataloged into LT 2012
10 - cataloged into LT 2013
15 - cataloged into LT 2014
1 - acquired previously but uncataloged until 2015 (have lots of these!)
20 - acquired 2015
37 - borrowed from library & elsewhere

FORMAT
78 - Dead Tree Books
24 - Audiobooks
3 - Online
- combination of dead tree and audio
- other

GENRE
63 - Fiction
1 - Christian fiction
3 - classics (not on the 1001 list)
24 - 1001 Books to Read Before You Die
15- general fiction
2 - World fiction, non -1001
9 - fantasy/sf/sff
1 - horror, suspense
10 - mystery/thriller
2 - Young Adult
1 - children's fiction
1 - western

34 ---Non-Fiction
1 - artbook
7 - Christianity
1 - Essays/ Newspaper columns/ short non-fiction
1 - Literary Criticism
8 - Memoir/biography/autobiography
1 - History
3 - Outdoors
1- Philosophy
5 - Psychology/sociology/self help
1 - Religion (not Christian, or not exclusively Christian)
5 - Science/Medical/Natural Science
- Travel
- True Crime

4 - Books of Short Stories or essays
4 - graphic novel
1 - graphic non-fiction
6 - poetry
- plays
- Other

AUTHORS

60 - Male Authors
44 - Female Authors
4 - Combination or Mix of male and female

57 - Authors that are new to me
5 - Authors previously encountered
4 - Rereads

Multiple books read in 2015 by same author:
6 books by Jane Austen - Mansfield Park, Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, Northanger Abbey, Persuasion
5 books by Craig Johnson - Death Without Company , Kindness Goes Unpunished, Another Man's Moccasins, The Dark Horse, Junkyard Dogs
3 books by Brene Brown - Daring Greatly, I Thought It Was Just Me (but it isn't), Rising Strong
3 books by Sigrid Undset - The Kristin Lavrensdatter trilogy
2 books by Ray Bradbury - Fahrenheit 451 & The Halloween Tree
2 books John F Brug - People's Bible Commentary
2 books Brian K. Vaughan & Fiona Staples Saga Vol 1 & Saga Vol 2
2 by Frank C Tillson - The Cock-Eyed Muse & Dreams for Sale

Nationality of Author:
1 - Austrailia
1 - Belarus
2 - Canada
1 - China
1 - Egyptian
1 - India
1 - Iran
1 - Japan
1 - Ireland
2 - Norway
1 - Pakistani
1 - Spain
1 - Sweden
19 - UK: England
1 - UK: Scotland
71 - USA

Birthplace or residence of Author if different from nationality:
USA - (born in China)
USA - born in Nepal
USA (T.S. Eliot, Grace Ozeki)
Laos (Residence)

Language Book Originally Published in:
1 - Arabic
96 - English
1 - Farsi
? - Gandhi
? - Voices from Chernobyl
2 - Norwegian
1- Japanese
1 - Spanish

ORIGINAL PUBLICATION DATE

1 - 1778
1 - 1800
1 - 1811
1 - 1813
1 - 1814
1 - 1815
2 - 1817
1 - 1889
2 - 1920
1 - 1921
1 - 1925
1 - 1927
1 - 1929
1 - 1933
1 - 1934
1 - 1936
1 - 1939
1 - 1940
1 - 1944
1 - 1945
1 - 1947
1 - 1953
1 - 1955
1 - 1960
1 - 1961
1 - 1962
1 - 1963
1 - 1966
1 - 1968
1 - 1970
1 - 1971
1 - 1972
1 - 1974
1 - 1980
2 - 1987
1 - 1989
1 - 1990
1 - 1991
3 - 1992
1 - 1994
2 - 1995
2 - 1996
2 - 2000
2 - 2001
2 - 2002
3 - 2003
3 - 2005
3 - 2006
3 - 2007
2 - 2008
1 - 2009
4 - 2010
3 - 2011
3 - 2012
2 - 2013
15 - 2014
9 - 2015

10streamsong
Editat: nov. 27, 2015, 3:22pm

American Authors Challenge

January - Carson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter -
February Henry James- skipped
March Richard Ford- Canada
April Louise Erdrich - Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse ROOT
May Sinclair Lewis - Main Street
June Wallace Stegner - Angle of Repose - on MT TBR (2014)
July Ursula K. Le Guin - The Dispossessed requested through ILL; 1001
August Larry McMurtry Boone's Lick
Flannery O' Connor- September
✔ - October Fahrenheit 451 & ✔The Halloween Tree - Ray Bradbury
✔ - November Barbara Kingsolver- Animal Dreams - on MT TBR -2013
E.L. Doctorow- December -Ragtime - requested from library

2015 British Author Challenge

January: ✔ - Kazuo Ishiguro : Remains of the Day
- Penelope Lively - Moon Tiger
February: ✔ Sarah Waters - Fingersmith from library - finished in April
- Evelyn Waugh - finished Brideshead Revisited audiobook in March
March : Daphne Du Maurier & China Mieville - skipped
April: Angela Carter & W. Somerset Maugham ✔- The Painted Veil
May- skipped- Margaret Drabble & Martin Amis
June: Beryl Bainbridge & Anthony Burgess A Clockwork Orange
July : - Virginia Woolf - To the Lighthouse - ROOT - 1001; - B.S. Johnson
August : Iris Murdoch & Graham Greene - The Quiet American
September : Andrea Levy & Salman Rushdie
October : Helen Dunmore & David Mitchell
November: Muriel Spark - The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie - & William Boyd
December : Hilary Mantel Bring Up the Bodies & P.G. Wodehouse

Thirteenth Month : Bernice Rubens & Aldous Huxley

1001 Books to Read Before You Die
My list is on this thread: http://www.librarything.com/topic/163173
Link to general list of books: http://www.librarything.com/bookaward/1001+Books+You+Must+Read+Before+You+Die

Goal: Make it to 120 books by the end of the year

✔ 103. Rabbit Run - John Updike - audiobook - 1960 - 1/9/2015 - US - 2014 AAC
✔ 104. The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro - 1989 - 1/15/2015 UK/Japan - BAC
✔ - Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen - 1813 - Reread - UK
✔ 105. Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh - 1944 - 3/07/15 - UK - BAC
✔ 106. Mansfield Park - Jane Austen - 1814 - 03/29/2014 UK
✔ 107. Fingersmith - Sarah Waters - 2002 04/21/2015 UK - BAC
✔ 108. Castle Rackrent - Maria Edgeworth - 1800 - Ireland - 5/11/2015
✔ 109. Main Street - Sinclair Lewis - 1920 - USA - AAC
✔ 110. A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess - 1962 - UK - 6/17/2015 BAC
***
✔ 112. Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen - 1811 - UK (6/27/2015) Jane Austen Challenge
✔ 113. At the Mountains of Madness - H. P. Lovecraft -1936 - US 7/06/2015 (novella)
✔ 114. To the Lighthouse - Virginia Woolf - 1927 - US 7/31/2015
✔ 115. Silence - Shusaku Endo - 1966 - Japan - 8/8/2015
✔ 116. Emma - Jane Austen - 1815 - UK - 8/14/2015
***
✔ 118. The Quiet American - Graham Greene - 1955 - UK - audiobook - 8/26/2015
***
✔ 121. Evelina - Francis Burney - 1778 - UK - 8/31/2015
✔ 122. The Dispossessed - Ursula Le Guin - 1974 - US - 9/16/2015
✔ - 2001: A Space Odyssey - Arthur C. Clarke - 1968 - US 9/ /2015; reread - does not add to 1001 numbers.
✔123. Midaq Alley - Naguib Mahfouz - 1947 - Egypt - 9/30/2015
✔124. Northanger Abbey - Jane Austen - 1817 - UK 10/31/2015
✔125. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie - Muriel Spark - 1961 - UK:Scotland - 11/27/2015

*** = books from 1001 read previous years but omitted from the count

11streamsong
Editat: gen. 11, 2016, 10:48am

Cumulative Starting 2014 + 1001 Books:


visited 41 states (18.2%)
Create your own visited map of The World

41 countries visited

Link to Global Reading Challenge:

http://www.librarything.com/topic/188308#

States Visited in Book Travels in 2015

Alabama: Go Set a Watchman - Harper Lee
Arizona Rock With Wings - Anne Hillerman - (Monument Valley)
Georgia - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter - Carson McCullers
Idaho - Angle of Repose - Wallace Stegner
Iowa - Gilead - Marilynne Robinson
Kentucky - Let Sleeping Dogs Lie - Rita Mae Brown - (also Virginia)
Minnesota - Main Street - Sinclair Lewis
Montana - Winter Wheat - Mildred Walker
New York Brown Girl Dreaming - Jacqueline Woodson
North Dakota Last Report on the Miracle at Little No Horse - Louise Erdrich
Pennsylvania: - Rabbit Run - John Updike
South Carolina: - Brown Girl Dreaming - Jacqueline Woodson
Wyoming: Death Without Company - Craig Johnson

Cumulative starting 2014:


visited 30 states (60%)
Create your own visited map of The United States

12streamsong
Editat: des. 31, 2015, 1:03pm

Books Acquired in 2015

The original goal was to keep the number of books purchased less than the number read from off my shelf in the ROOTS challenge. I've failed. But not badly. Maybe next year.




= 21 read/5 reading /1 already read-wanted my own copy/ 4 reference: 68 acquired: 37 added to Planet TBR

JANUARY
1. Winter Wheat by Mildred Walker RL book club
2. ***Reading*** The How of Happiness - Sonja Lyubomirsky
3. The God of Small Things: A Novel by Arundhati Roy 1/29 FOL
4. The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family by Dave Pelzer -1/29 FOL
5. The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson -1/29 FOL
6. Dear Life: Stories by Alice Munro -1/29 FOL
FEBRUARY
7. The Upstairs Wife - Rafia Zakaria 2/2/2015 LTER
8. ***Reading*** Born To Be Good - Dacher Keltner 2/4/2015 MOOC Science of Happiness
9. A Map of Betrayal - Ha Jin - 2/4/2015 LTER
10. Don't Lets Go to the Dogs Tonight - Alexandra Fuller 2/5/2015 discarded due to dog :-(
11. Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness - Alexandra Fuller - RL book club - 2/5/2015
MARCH
12. Astoria: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson's Lost Pacific Empire: A Story of Wealth, Ambition, and Survival by Peter Stark - 3/21/2015 for RL book club
APRIL
13. Reference/Cookbook Quick & Easy Dump Dinners - Cathy Mitchell - (4/4/2015)
14. The Predator Paradox: Ending the War with Wolves, Bears, Cougars, and Coyotes - - John Shivik - L TER 4/7/2015
15. Simply Tai Chi - Graham Bryant & Lorraine James -book and DVD - Presbyterian bazar - 4/11/2015
16. Room - Emma Donoghue Presbyterian bazar - 4/11/2015
17. A Tale for the Time Being - Ruth Ozeki 4/14/2015 RLBC
18. Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town - Jon Krakauer - 4/21/2015
19. March - Geraldine Brooks - Library book shelf 4/23/2015
20. Tales of Burning Love - Louis Erdrich - Library Book shelf 4/23/2015
21. A Yellow Raft in Blue Water - Michael Dorris - library book shelf 4/23/2015
22. Bring Up the Bodies - Hilary Mantel 4/25/2015 for BAC later this year
MAY
23. Bitch in a Bonnet - Robert Rodi - 5/05/2015
24. All the Light We Cannot See - Anthony Doerr - RL Book Club - 05/05/2015
25. I Thought It Was Just Me - Brene Brown - homework while counselor on vacation :-) 05/8/2015
26. Castle Rackrent - Maria Edgeworth
27. 29 Gifts - Cami Walker (mentioned in Happiness MOOC)
28. Any Other Name - Craig Johnson - bought for author tour/signing
JUNE
29. Breakfast with Buddha - Roland Merullo - gift
30. ***Reading***The Mockingbird Next Door - Marja Mills - RLBC later this year.
31. Evelina - Frances Burney - group read
32. Travels With Epicurus - Daniel Klein - RLBC
33. already read The Cold Dish - Craig Johnson - signed copy from author reading
34. The Theft of Memory - Jonathan Kozol - LTER
35. At the Mountains of Madness and Other Tales of Horror - H. P. Lovecrat - group read
36. Reference 1001 Books to Read Before You Die - Peter Boxall - 2010 edition
37. Reference/Cookbook The Mediterranean Diet Cookbook - Nancy Harmon Jenkins - FOL shelf
JULY
38. The Children Act - Ian McEwan - RL book club
39. ***Reading*** Bitch In a Bonnet: Reclaiming Jane Austen from the Stiffs, the Snobs, the Simps and the Saps (Volume 2
Robert Rodi JA group read
40. Rising Strong - Brene Brown - LTER
41. Crooked Little Heart: A Novel by Anne Lamott - FOL shelf 7/31/2015
AUGUST
42. Fatal Deception - Michael Bowker - FOL shelf audiobook
SEPTEMBER
43. ***Reading*** Shock Doctrine - Naomi Klein - RL book club
44. Reference/Cookbook 250 Best Meals in a Mug - Camilla V. Saulsbury
44. Girl Waits With Gun - Amy Stewart - LTER 9/10/2015
45. Fourth of July Creek - Smith Henderson - Montana Book Festival
46. Put Sey (Good Enough) - Victor A. Charlo - Montana Book Festival
47. People Before the Park: The Kootenai and Blackfeet before Glacier National Park - Sally Thompson - Montana Book Festival
48. The Bone People: A Novel - Keri Hulme - FOL
49. Elizabeth Costello - Coetzee, J. M. - FOL
50. A Common Life: The Wedding Story (The Mitford Years #6) - Jan Karon - FOL
51. The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - Moggach, Deborah - FOL
52. Life of Pi - Yann Martel - FOL
53. Joyce's Ulysses (Great Courses) (Teaching Company) DVD Course 237 - Professor James A.W. Heffernan - audiobook - FOL
54. SuperFreakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance - Levitt, Steven D. - audiobook - FOL
55. A Stolen Life: A Memoir - Jaycee Dugard - audiobook - FOL
56. A Redbird Christmas - Fanny Flagg - FOL
57. Paddling to Where I Stand: Agnes Alfred, Kwakwaka'wakw Noblewoman - Agnes Alfred - FOL
58. Level 4: Virus Hunters of the CDC - McCormick, Joseph B - FOL
59. Falling Leaves: The Memoir of an Unwanted Chinese Daughter - Mah, Adeline Yen = FOL
60. Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China - Jung Chang - FOL
OCTOBER
61. The 20/20 Diet - Phil McGraw
62. Without You, There Is No Us - Suki Kim - LTER
NOVEMBER
63. Cider With Rose - Laurie Lee - FOL shelf; 2016 BAC
64. The Reluctant Fundamentalist - Mohsin Hamid - FOL shelf
65. The Most Wanted Man in China: My Journey from Scientist to Enemy of the State - Fang Lizhi - LTER
66. The Ninemile Wolves - Rick Bass - FOL
DECEMBER
67. War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy -
68. Pigs in Heaven - Barbara Kingsolver -
69. Divided: The Perils of Our Growing Inequality - David Cay Johnston for RLBC
70. These Heroic, Happy Dead: Stories - Luke Mogelson - LTER

13streamsong
Editat: nov. 6, 2015, 9:45am

And that's all, folks! Welcome to the new thread!

14Whisper1
Editat: nov. 6, 2015, 10:28am

I've added Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster to the tbr pile. I love the opening image! And, I enjoyed looking through your lists! Can I ask you what code you use to import check marks? Thanks!

15streamsong
nov. 6, 2015, 10:30am

Thanks for stopping by, Linda and helping break in the new thread.

I'd love to dazzle you with my coding skills, but actually, I just copy and paste the checkmarks. ;-)

16Whisper1
nov. 6, 2015, 10:33am

Thanks for letting me know re. checkmarks. Do you mind if I borrow this for my thread?

17Oberon
nov. 6, 2015, 10:34am

>2 streamsong: So if you are not working on Ebola do we get to ask what you are working on or I am going to be shot now?

18msf59
nov. 6, 2015, 10:35am

Happy Friday, Janet! Happy New Thread! Hope you have a nice weekend planned, with lots of reading time.

19streamsong
Editat: nov. 6, 2015, 10:52am

>16 Whisper1: Help yourself, Linda. Different threads have different style checkmarks - copy & paste seems to work for them all.

>17 Oberon: Chlamydia. Not so glamorous, huh? But it's the number one cause of preventable blindness in third world countries, as well as being a major cause of infertility in women in the western world.

There's a community presentation tonight about what people from our lab did in Africa this past year during the Ebola outbreak. I'll probably go - sometimes I imagine inflicting myself on the Peace Corp once I retire. Although it would be much more fun (and I'd perhaps be more use) to finagle a position as a volunteer in Australia where chlamydia is devastating the koala bear population in the eastern part of the continent.

>18 msf59: Hi Mark. Happy weekend to you, too! We'll be celebrating DD's birthday tomorrow. Both adult kids will be here, as will my mom. Pretty much stress free as we are going out to eat at a French restaurant.

20Oberon
nov. 6, 2015, 11:12am

>19 streamsong: I think public health is fascinating and the disease doesn't need to kill off people to be worth eradicating. The guinea worm disease is pretty non-glamorous but the potential eradication makes it a big deal.

I must say that chlamydia affected koala bears is not something I expected. Sort of thought it was a human thing only.

21streamsong
nov. 6, 2015, 11:33am

>20 Oberon: Yup, and the thing to remember is that although Chlamydia is easily treated by antibiotics, antibiotics can be quite hard to come by in the third world and hence the blindness. And with the human infertility strains, the disease is silent until the damage is done.

The animal strains are a different species - C. psittaci - which cause psittacosis in birds and other critters.

There was recently a kickstarter (or gofundme?) campaign for some of the koala research. It's a sad day for science when scientists have to take their research (how do antibiotics affect the bacteria that digest the koala's only food source - eucalyptus?) through that sort of campaign. (The public responded magnificently and it was fully funded).

22weird_O
nov. 6, 2015, 12:53pm

Oh lists you keep!! I am floored. Do you build and maintain such records in your scientific research? I imagine so, but...

23scaifea
nov. 7, 2015, 8:09am

Happy new thread, Janet! Your research sounds important and very worthy!

24streamsong
nov. 7, 2015, 10:51am

>22 weird_O: Hi Bill! Thanks for stopping by. No, actually I'm one of the most disorganized people I know. The lists just sort of grow as the year goes on.

Listing all the books acquired this year ( >12 streamsong: ) and keeping that list right in my face has kept me from acquiring quite so many this year. Even acquiring fewer, it's humbling to know that I've read slightly less than half of what I've bought.

>23 scaifea: Hi Amber! It's always good to see you. I think the research the group does is important, but I'm a mere technician. Having been there twenty five years, I like to think the place couldn't run without me, but a lot of what I do is pretty routine.

25streamsong
nov. 7, 2015, 11:06am



90. Feynman - Jim Ottaviani - 2011
- TIOLI #8: Read a book with red on the cover; graphic non-fiction; library

The author, Jim Ottaviana is the one that Mark introduced at Booktopia. I was really intrigued by the idea of scientific biographies for the YA crowd.

Richard Feynman was one of the most brilliant and quirkiest of physicists. This biography starts with his boyhood interest in science and goes on to his rather unorthodox lifestyle and his career in Quantum Electro Dynamics. He worked on the Manhattan Project and had notable discoveries throughout his career.

I won't pretend that I understand what Feynman achieved. As a cabdriver said to him in the book after he won the Nobel Prize, if what he discovered was easily told in a three minutes, it wouldn't have been worth the Nobel Prize.

I was a bit disappointed by the lack of science in the first part of the book, but the last twenty pages finally had Feynman giving some of his intro physics lectures and there was a great bibliography. In hindsight. I can see it wasn't a bad scheme to get readers interested in the man before trying to explain what he actually did since. 3.8 stars

:-) I'll probably try another of Ottaviana's books sometime later.

26streamsong
nov. 8, 2015, 10:41am



91. Nimona - Noelle Stevenson
- 2015 - graphic novel; TIOLI #5. Read a Fantasy; library

Ballister Blackheart is intent on battling the evil Institute of Law Enforcement and Heroics which is not only bringing the country to ruin, but set his best boyhood friend, Ambrosius Goldenloin, against him.

And then a teenage girl Nimona appears, wanting to be his apprentice. When she reveals herself as a shapeshifter who is not easily dismissed, Ballister takes her on.

Nimona is one of the best female characters I have met in a long time. No parents in sight, this teen-ager is the antithesis of a Disney princess. She has a stocky body and is outspoken, action oriented, brave and loyal, with one heck of a kick-ass attitude. And, she's a much more powerful being than anyone realizes.

Great humor and fun twists as the plot develops that we each can be the shape we choose for ourselves, and relationships rule.

4.5 stars

27msf59
nov. 8, 2015, 10:58am

Hooray for Nimona, Janet! It might still be my favorite GN of the year!

Happy Sunday, my friend.

28scaifea
nov. 9, 2015, 6:34am

Well, Nimona keeps coming up on so many threads here... I may have to check that one out...

29PaulCranswick
nov. 9, 2015, 10:25am

Janet, you keep your stats and lists even more avidly than I do myself.

Love the precision of your reading and read lists.

I will be reading H is for Hawk myself this month so our reading bumps into each other a wee bit recently.

Congratulations on your latest thread. xx

30evilmoose
nov. 9, 2015, 12:45pm

I love all of your stats, they are glorious! And congratulations on the latest thread, and thanks for the reminder that I really need to get around to reading H is for Hawk

31streamsong
Editat: nov. 10, 2015, 11:16am

>27 msf59: Yup, Nimona was excellent. I think I got this rec from Ellen and you, so thank you. DS was here last week and I surprised him with my choice of reading matter.

>28 scaifea: Hi Amber - Give it a try! I think next time someone says they are in a book slump this may be a book that will help get them out.

>29 PaulCranswick: Hi Paul! The lists are a bit embarrassing. In RL, I'm not much of a list maker; I definitely should do more to keep myself on track. I hope you enjoy H is for Hawk - I'm still loving it. I have my BAC book The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie here from the library, ready to start soon.

>30 evilmoose: Hi Megan - nice to see you, too. I think H is for Hawk would be right up your alley. And I love the author's reading of the audiobook. She is a gifted reader, which sadly, many authors aren't.

I should finish Voices from Chernobyl today. Tough, stark read. I started my Kingsolver read Animal Dreams to give myself a bit of a break from it.

32Whisper1
nov. 10, 2015, 9:45am

I am heading to the library after work to obtain a copy of Voices from Chernobyl. Happy Day To You!!!

33FAMeulstee
nov. 13, 2015, 9:24am

>1 streamsong: lovely painting and poem!

34PaulCranswick
nov. 13, 2015, 8:02pm

>31 streamsong: Same here, I am just wrapping up Voices from Chernobyl and some of them are almost scarring.

Have a lovely weekend, Janet.

35streamsong
Editat: nov. 15, 2015, 3:51pm

>32 Whisper1: Thanks for stopping by, Linda. I'll be very interested to read what you think of VFC.

>34 PaulCranswick: Anita! Good to see you! Off to find your thread!

>35 streamsong: Hi Paul! 'Almost scarring' - great phrase. I'll be interested to read your review.

I'm currently reading Animal Dreams for the Kingsolver AAC and loving it. I should put it aside to read the Real Life Book Club's choice for Thursday, The Mockingbird Next Door. But no, I'll finish the Kingsolver first. :-)

36msf59
nov. 15, 2015, 2:45pm

Happy Sunday, Janet! I loved Pigs of Heaven. I WANT to read Animal Dreams too. I WANT to read all of her work.

37FAMeulstee
nov. 16, 2015, 3:17am

link to my thread, still reading slow, but at least I can read a bit :-)

38streamsong
Editat: nov. 16, 2015, 9:32am

>36 msf59: Thanks, Mark! I definitely want to read more Kingsolver. Animal Dreams is a good one and I've had Pigs in Heaven on the radar since I read The Bean Trees a few years ago. (!)

A while back I said on Donna's thread that trying to keep up with several author challenges is like riding a fast train. You read an author you like, want to read more, and whoosh! the next author is already in sight.

>37 FAMeulstee: Thanks, Anita! I'm glad you are able to read again!

More books that have made it into my door:

63. Cider With Rosie - Laurie Lee - FOL shelf; 2016 BAC
64. The Reluctant Fundamentalist - Mohsin Hamid - FOL shelf
65. The Most Wanted Man in China: My Journey from Scientist to Enemy of the State - Fang Lizhi - LTER

39streamsong
nov. 16, 2015, 9:38am



93. Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster - Svetlana Alexievich
- 2006 - Nobel winner; TIOLI #14: Read a book that was first published at the end of a war; library

The 1986 explosion at the Chernobyl Power Plant was one of the worst nuclear accidents in history. Ms Alexievich's book is the ongoing human story.

The author stands back and lets the interviewees tell their stark stories in their own words. There is a concert of voices – beginning with the then pregnant wife of one of the fireman who originally responded to the fire and whose husband, like all the initial responders, died an agonizing death over the next two weeks.

We hear from clean up workers and their spouses now devastated by cancer; from farmers who were told it was safe to harvest and sell their crops while government authorities around them wore radiation-protective gear. We hear of a generation of young men and women whose children are doomed to the most extreme of birth defects.

We hear stories of heroism and stories of a government more concerned about preserving its image than about protecting its people; stockpiles of iodine which were intended to be given to inhabitants to protect their thyroids were never given out. Individuals were told they would have to give up their communist party cards for failing to support the Soviet minimization of the disaster. Belarusian physicists who recognized the magnitude of the disaster were threatened with insane asylums.

And the radioactive contamination will persist for tens of thousands of years to come.

Letting the people tell their stories makes this a non-technical read. It also makes this book emotionally devastating.

It's an important book for anyone in the shadow of a nuclear power plant – and in this day and age that is most of the world. The Chernobyl incident contaminated not only Belarus and other Soviet countries, but much of Europe and even North America. I came away feeling immensely saddened but also much more educated.

4.5 stars

40kidzdoc
nov. 16, 2015, 10:02am

Great review of Voices from Chernobyl, Janet. I'll resume reading it shortly.

41streamsong
nov. 23, 2015, 8:38am

>4o Thanks, Darryl. It was a tough one to read but I learned a lot. "Enjoyed" isn't quite the right word.

Major cutbacks at the University of Montana due to decreased enrollment. I know there are always several factors, but I sincerely wonder if Krakauer's book Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town contributed.

http://missoulian.com/news/local/um-will-cut-faculty-staff-jobs-because-of-falli...

DD's job is not actually a University job but has space on the campus as an affiliated organization, so she is safe for now.

42streamsong
nov. 23, 2015, 8:59am



94. H is for Hawk - Helen Macdonald - 2014
- TIOLI #15. Read a memoir or autobiography by a creative woman; audiobook; library

When Helen Macdonald 's father passed away suddenly, she was overwhelmed by grief. To help herself work through this process, she fell back on her love of falconry and decided to obtain and train a young goshawk, a species of hawk that some say is a bit hardheaded and difficult to manage. She details her growing relationship with the hawk, whom she calls Mabel, and their growing bond as the training progresses and Mabel matures.

Ms Macdonald also explores author T.H. White's life and his lesser known book The Goshawk. This book details White's initial attempt at training a hawk; it was quite unsuccessful and used techniques that White himself was ashamed to have used as he progressed as a falconer. Although I've read and loved The Once and Future King this was my first glimpse into TH White, the man. It was interesting to see parallels and contrasts of White's life in his King Arthur books. As a gay man, White struggled to fit into a non-accepting society. He was also anxious to free himself from his disliked profession of school master which recalled to him his own difficult childhood.

Although this is one of my favorite non-fiction books this year, I did have one quibble with the author's experiences.

When you have animals, stuff happens. But when the stuff happens, you need to fess up, make it good with the landowner and pull out your wallet or offer to work it off to make it right. It happened several times, but I'm thinking especially of the incident where the hawk killed several pheasants in a pen of exotic pheasants. Macdonald quickly stashed them in her hunting coat, beat feet out of there, congratulated herself on avoiding an unpleasant confrontation and most probably went home to dine on pheasant.

No. Just no.

I listened to the audiobook narrated by Ms Macdonald. While author narrations are sometimes a bit sketchy, she is a talented reader and helped make listening to this book a really pleasurable experience.

This would have been a 4.5 star book, but I deducted a half for the lapse in ethics

43streamsong
Editat: nov. 26, 2015, 11:06am

Speaking of H is for Hawk, last night I watched an interview with Helen Macdonald on a TV show called Well Read.

Here's the link if anyone wants to check her out:

http://www.wellread.org/the-tv-show/well-read-tv-show/?archiveid=131

44streamsong
Editat: nov. 26, 2015, 11:30am

And this was on Craig Johnson's Facebook page:

"It's Christmas Eve in Absaroka County, but it's neither silent nor holy when a drug-crazed gunman takes a hostage at the local church where he demands a sacrifice. With only his one-eyed deputy Double-Tough for backup, it's going to be difficult for Sheriff Walt Longmire to persuade the addict that in the Land of the Blind, the one-eyed man is king.
*To receive the Christmas short story on Christmas Eve, sign up for the newsletter by hitting the contact button at "

www.craigallenjohnson.com

45msf59
Editat: nov. 26, 2015, 11:52am

Happy Thanksgiving, Janet! I hope you have a great holiday.

Good review of H is for Hawk. Big Thumb! It still remains one of my top reads of the year.

Do you have a copy of Pigs in Heaven? If not, I would gladly pass on my copy to you.

46EBT1002
nov. 26, 2015, 2:27pm

Great review of H is for Hawk, Janet. I had a reaction to that same scene but didn't really process it. Thanks for giving it the attention (and calling out) that it deserves.

I'm also really glad that you read and enjoyed Nimona. It's one of my favorite graphic novels of late.

Meanwhile...

47streamsong
Editat: nov. 27, 2015, 9:17am

>45 msf59: >46 EBT1002: Thank you Mark and Ellen for the Thanksgiving greetings! You two were co-recommenders (do you like my new word?) of H is for Hawk and Nimona. How could they miss with two such great warblers?

ETA: I know that I am super sensitive to the landowner thing, but I am a (very small) landowner and am amazed at what people will do and run away from.

My mom & I met my son for a truly wonderful Thanksgiving buffet in Missoula. It has been very cold here - lows at 0, high's in the 20's with an inch or two of snow on the ground. DM was anxious about the drive, but it was very clear and sunny. The mountains were beautiful so the drive seemed very holiday-ish.

I need to go in to work for just a couple hours - and then I will be cooking a bit to generate leftovers. :-) I have a small turkey breast that I'll pop in the oven with a bit of dressing, make a small batch of my favorite cranberry relish, bake a sweet potato. Mom was saying that she missed Thanksgiving leftovers, so I'll create some.

No black Friday shopping for me! I did order myself a copy of War and Peace from the big A earlier today, since the group read thread is up. http://www.librarything.com/topic/206069#5353491

I hope everyone else had a wonderful day!

48streamsong
nov. 27, 2015, 9:43am



94. Animal Dreams - Barbara Kingsolver - 1990 -
- November AAC; Global Reading Challenge: Nicaragua; ROOT #39/50; 2003 = 2 ROOT points =142/200; TIOLI #9. Read a book whose title completes the phrase "I am thankful for"

Codi grew up in the very small town Grace, Arizona. Her childhood legacy included a dead mother, a sister who was her best friend and confidant, and a distant father who instilled in his girls that they were above the inhabitants of the town.

After giving up her intention of becoming a doctor just short of finishing her residency, she drifted into a relationship that was more friendship than love. But now that relationship is over. Codi has returned to Grace to teach high school biology for a year and to evaluate father’s mental well-being. She has heard rumors of his memory loss that affect his medical practice and possibly his ability to live alone.
But as they say, you can’t go home again.

She soon learns an old flame from high school from whom she has kept an earthshaking secret is also back in the area. Her father is clearly struggling; her good friend from high school has married and has a large family; the fruit and nut groves that provide the living for most of the valley’s people are dying from a mining company's waste runoff – and there doesn’t seem to be much the people can do about it. The biggest change of all is that her younger sister Hallie, has headed to Nicaragua to help struggling subsistence level farmers. Hallie has landed in the middle of civil war as the American backed Contras wreak havoc on the local population.

It’s a story of life moving onward like a freight train - sometimes sweetly - sometimes searing the soul.

The characters are wonderfully fleshed out; I quite enjoyed the storyline.

Bonuses are the wonderful descriptions of Arizona’s valleys, sacred to several tribes of American Indians and the vision of living as an integral part of the land that the Indian people cherish.

Overall, a good strong read, that once again makes me wanting to read more Kingsolver.

4 stars

49kidzdoc
nov. 27, 2015, 11:56am

Great review of Animal Dreams, Janet!

50EBT1002
nov. 28, 2015, 1:10am

Nice review of Animal Dreams, Janet. I remember liking it a lot when I read it eons ago. I just finished my reread of The Bean Trees and can almost see myself doing several Kingsolver rereads: Pigs in Heaven, Animal Dreams, and maybe The Poisonwood Bible. I haven't read everything she's written but most. I would say just skip Prodigal Summer; in my opinion, it's the weak link in her oeuvre.

51streamsong
nov. 28, 2015, 9:40am

>49 kidzdoc: Thank you and thanks for stopping by, Darryl!

>50 EBT1002: Thanks, Ellen! I think I've read about half of Kingsolver's fiction and one of her non-fiction. I have not read Prodigal Summer. I'll definitely keep what you said in mind.

I have thought about reading The Lacuna, but I have a nonfiction book on Planet TBR called Frida: A Biography of Frida Kahlo that I keep thinking I should read first. My father was very intrigued by Frida Kahlo; the book is one from his library.

52weird_O
nov. 28, 2015, 3:52pm

Heh: "Planet TBR." Love that'n. It's just down the stairs. I go there often. :-)

53streamsong
nov. 29, 2015, 9:19am

>52 weird_O: - Thanks for stopping by, Bill. Mt TBR just kept growing and growing. I think as it grew and its gravity increased, more book matter was drawn to it :-) And now :



Which brings me to my newest book resolution for the next month. I have read 40 ROOTS so far this year. My goal for the year is 50. I've pulled from the stacks (and piles and obscure corners) about twenty books that are short or quick read books to attempt to sprint to the ROOT finish line.

Today I will try and sprint through A Guide to Navajo Sandpaintings - by Mark Bahti. This is a shorty with only a bit over sixty pages and lots of wonderful photographs. It's wonderfully interesting so far. I've been a fan of Hillerman's books with hatalii Jim Chee. I have several artwork sandpaintings in my home that were gifts from my brother who lives in Arizona.

54streamsong
Editat: nov. 30, 2015, 1:01pm



95. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: A Novel - Muriel Spark - 1961
BAC; 1001; TIOLI # 10 - Read a book by an author whose name contains no repeating vowels; library

Miss Jean Brodie, whose fiance was killed in France in The Great War, has arrived at a private Scottish girls' school. She draws around herself a group of six students to give special attention and lessons. Each girl has a role assigned her in Miss Brodie's mind – the pretty one, the one famous for sex, the one whom everyone can blame.

Miss Brodie is an ardent admirer of Mussolini and then Hitler as they come to power. In turn, she rules the thoughts and actions of her six girls with an iron tongue.

The following is from 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die:

”From Miss Brodie's chilling Jesuitcal assertion – 'Give me a girl at an impressionable age, and she is mine for life' – through to the novel's dark conclusions, Spark poses a series of difficult questions about education, femininity and authoritarianism.”

Saying that I “enjoyed” this book is not quite accurate, since I found it disturbing. however, it is one that I am sure that I will remember for a long time to come.

4 stars

ETA - On the advice of the 1001-ers, I've requested the movie through the library.

55streamsong
Editat: des. 1, 2015, 9:31am



96. The Children's Story - James Clavell - 1963 - TIOLI # 17 has the phrase inside the book "Don't be afraid"; ROOT #40/50; not previously cataloged = 1 ROOT point = 143/200

This is the first book in my sprint through 10 ROOTs to finish reading 50 books off my shelf that were acquired before 01/01/2015. This one has actually been residing on the shelf for several years, although I had not logged it into Library Thing. It’s one my Mom passed on to me; one year her superintendent gave copies to all the teachers.

The book is very short – although called a novella, it’s more like a short story.

A country is conquered by another and a ‘new teacher’ comes to take over a class. The new teacher discards things like the Pledge of Allegiance (no one understands it anyway), the flag (all it is are pretty colors) and shows kids that if they ask God for candy, nothing happens, but if they pray to “Our Leader” candy appears on their desk.

This is a cautionary tale whose theme is quite familiar. Were these themes so familiar when Clavell wrote this in 1963 or did this book popularize it?

Anyway, a serendipitous read after just finishing The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie with a similar theme.





56streamsong
des. 1, 2015, 9:34am



97. Rising Strong - Brene Brown - 2015 - LTER - TIOLI #1 Read a book whose author's name contains a mark other than plain English letters; 2015

Brene Brown is absolutely my favorite author of psychology for the lay person.

Her latest book, Rising Strong adds to my admiration of her work and her vision.“The epigraph for Daring Greatly is Theodore Roosevelt's powerful quote from his 1910 'Man in the Arena' speech:

'It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood' who strives valiantly; … who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly.' “
p. xxi

The problem with living, but especially when you are daring greatly and living wholeheartedly, is that you will end up face down in the arena. Instead of avoiding this position, Brown suggests we have a new and unique perspective while we are down there and suggests way to evaluate the whys and get on with the 'what next?'s' in order to truly get on with the life we want.

I especially enjoyed her concept of 'the story I am telling myself' since the story we tell in our heads is often not a reflection of what is truly going on, especially when one is trying to make sense of another's actions.

4.5 stars. I plan to share this book with several people in my life.

57streamsong
des. 2, 2015, 9:08am

My copy of War and Peace arrived yesterday for the group reading starting in January.

I hadn't realized the utter size of the physical book. It could be dangerous. If I dropped it on a cat .... cat squish. If I fall asleep while reading and it hits my face, I could be damaged for life. ;-)

Part of me wants to start reading it right away.

58EBT1002
des. 4, 2015, 12:39am

>56 streamsong: I adore her famous TED Talk. It's the very best thing I've seen on the internet. Ever. Well, except LibraryThing....
I have the book Rising Strong and I need to read it!

Hmmm, a group read of War and Peace?

59The_Hibernator
des. 4, 2015, 6:25am

>57 streamsong: DON'T drop it on your cat. I have the Norton Critical Edition of War and Peace and hope to read it some day. Though I'm trying to focus on women authors right now. I'll be reading To the Lighthouse and Mrs Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf for a bloggers readalong this Jan and Feb.

60streamsong
des. 5, 2015, 8:24am

> Hi Ellen - It's great that you think highly of Brene Brown, too. I value your opinion as a professional in the field. :-) She was recommended to me earlier this year, and I started out with her two TED talks. This is the third of her books that I've read - I was tickled to win an ER copy of it. I think you'll enjoy Rising Strong when you get to it.

Hee, hee. I'm trying to psyche myself up so I don't back out on War and Peace. I'm not sure I'm a War and Peace type gal, but I'll give it a shot. There's a link to the group read in >47 streamsong:

>Hey Rachel! Whoa, I bet your edition of W & P is twice the size of mine! Think of the workouts you could do with that sucker - like every ten pages, do fifty lifts of it above your head or some such. :-)

I enjoyed both of the Virginia Woolf books you mentioned, which actually, are the only two I've read. Mrs Dalloway, especially, blew me away.

61streamsong
des. 5, 2015, 8:41am



98. Girl Waits With Gun - Amy Stewart - 2015
- LTER - TIOLI # 14 Read a book started prior to 12/01/2015

In the early 1900's three sisters are living quietly on their farm several miles outside of town.

A trip to town, however, changes everything when their buggy is smashed by a motor car. Naturally enough, the oldest of the three wants to have the driver pay damages. She finds, however that the driver is a local silk factory owner, Henry Kaufman, bent on thuggery and having things his own way.

She persists in obtaining reimbursement and Kaufman and his gang swing into action. They threaten to kidnap the beautiful youngest sister and sell her into white slavery. Bricks with threatening notes are thrown through windows, shots are fired, arson attempted.

None of the town's officials are willing to help the women – they are all well-acquainted with the factory owners' bullying and violence that occurred during a recent strike.

The local sheriff, however stands up, commits his department to end the terrorism and teaches the women, especially the oldest, how to protect themselves and how to obtain the evidence they need if they want to slay a Goliath.

I really enjoyed this story of wonderful, strong women at a time when women have to step outside their proscribed roles to do this. The three sisters (or are they?) are wonderfully realized, each with distinct personalities and interests and quirky enough that I would love to read more and am hoping for a sequel.

The most amazing part is that this story is based on a real incident gleaned from vivid (if a bit melodramatic) newspaper stories and leading to the first woman deputy sheriff in the United States.

Highly recommended for those looking for a light, but not fluffy read.

62qebo
des. 5, 2015, 8:55am

>61 streamsong: I've had an eye on this because I'm a fan of Amy Stewart's gardening books. Had no idea what to expect. Glad it holds up.

63streamsong
des. 5, 2015, 9:05am

>62 qebo: Hi Katherine - Good to see you! I remembered one of your reviews (maybe The Drunken Botanist?) when I decided to request this book. I'll definitely have to look into more by her.

64streamsong
des. 5, 2015, 9:58pm

Thirty Tweets About Science That Will Make You Laugh and Then Think

http://www.buzzfeed.com/kellyoakes/science-tweets

65Donna828
des. 6, 2015, 7:09pm

Janet, wishing you luck in that sprint to get to that magic number of 50 books read off your shelf. I'm disappointed that I've only read 32 of my own books this year. Last year's total was 38, but I read 58 in 2013. I'm backsliding. I do have a few pulled out to read but first have two library books to read.

Good luck with War and Peace. Been there, done that!

66streamsong
des. 7, 2015, 8:46am

Hi Donna- Thanks for stopping by. I have several from the shelf that are either very short or that I started earlier this year and did not quite complete - so I think I will make it.

If my eyes cooperate. I've been having some eye problems the last few weeks - mostly evenings and mostly with moving images (TV).

Yay for you for reading War and Peace!

67streamsong
des. 14, 2015, 8:51am



99. Persuasion - Jane Austen - 1817
- Read Jane Austen in a year challenge; audiobook; 1001 (reread); ROOT #41/50; acquired 2008 = 7 ROOT points = 149/200

Anne Elliot and Frederick Wentworth were happily in love and engaged to be married. However, due to Wentworth's lack of fortune and social standing, Anne's dearest friend, the older Lady Russell, persuaded her that for her own happiness, Anne should break the ties.

Anne remained unmarried when seven years later, Wentworth reappears into her social circle. Now through his distinguished service in the Navy, he is a Captain and has an adequate fortune to interest all the young women in the area. Anne finds she is still in love with him; but she hurt him cruelly by her withdrawal seven years ago and he no longer seems to care for her.

A good-enough love story, it seems to me to have less of the snarky social commentary than her others. I just didn't find it as funny or as fun as others There were some great moments, and some great lines, but overall, no.

It was the first Jane Austen that I ever read and is, actually, the one that made me think Jane Austen perhaps not my cup of Regency tea.

I did love this exchange:

(Anne) 'We do not forget you as soon as you forget us. We cannot help ourselves. We live at home, quiet, confined, and our feelings prey upon us. You always have business of some sort or other to take you back into the world.'

(Captain Harvile): 'I won't allow it to be any more man's nature than women's to be inconstant or to forget those they love or have loved. I believe the reverse. I believe... Let me just observe that all histories are against you, all stories, prose, and verse. I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which did not have something to say on women's fickleness.'

(Anne) 'But they were all written by men.'

68streamsong
Editat: des. 14, 2015, 9:00am

Over the weekend I watched the classic movie made in the 60's from one of my recent reads. I wouldn't have recognized the actress, although she's one of my favorites. Her lovely distinct voice, however, was much the same 50+ years ago.



Anyone recognize the actress and the role?

70streamsong
Editat: des. 14, 2015, 9:41am

>69 qebo: Perfect! Gold star! I think I need to watch more of her early work. Any suggestions?

71weird_O
des. 14, 2015, 10:02am

Travels with My Aunt (1972). An adaption of the Graham Green novel. Nominated for Best Actress Oscar.

California Suite (1978). Another Oscar win, for best supporting actress. Neal Simon play/film. I didn't much like the film, but Maggie Smith did good.

A Room with a View (1985). Great Merchant/Ivory version of the great Forster novel. Best supporting Oscar nomination.

72streamsong
des. 14, 2015, 10:37am

>71 weird_O: Thanks, Bill! I was able to put a hold on California Suite at the library.

I haven't read A Room With a View. I always like reading the book first, so I'll have to try to get that one (finally!) read this year.

No luck in finding Travels With My Aunt in either the Netflix DVD's or through the library. I'll have to keep my eyes peeled for it.

73bell7
des. 14, 2015, 11:09am

>68 streamsong: I had to look it up from Katherine's link :) I've been meaning to go back and watch Othello with Laurence Olivier now that I know who the actress is. I had no idea who she was when I watched the film for a college class.

74streamsong
des. 15, 2015, 8:43am

>73 bell7: Mary, that sounds like a great idea. It would be interesting to see her in a classical role.

When I was searching online for her earlier films, several mentions were made of her outstanding performance in Richard III. I've never read that one or seen the play, but again, it's another one not available to me through Netflix DVD or ILL.

Several years ago I was working my way through the American Film Institutes lists of best 100 films. There are links on this Wikipedia page for best 100, best Cheers, best heroes and villains, etc https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AFI%27s_100_Years...100_Movies Perhaps I'll get back to some of these in the long dark Montana January evenings

75streamsong
des. 15, 2015, 9:04am



100. Where Angels Go: Shirley, Goodness & Mercy are Back - Debbie Macomber - 2007
- TIOLI #5. Read a funny book about a holiday
- ROOT# 42/50; acq'd 2013 = 2 ROOT points; 151/200

In December, I often turn to lighter reading, as well as trying to read a few Christmas-y books.

Debbie Macomber is the queen of feel good chick lit with happy endings.

In this story, three angels named Shirley, Goodness and Mercy descend to earth for assignments to accomplish before Christmas. Because of their unorthodox problem solving they haven't been allowed assignments on Earth in a while. However angels are in high demand over the holidays and they are given one more chance.

The three assignments are all heart-tuggers: a dying elderly man who needs to know that his wife with Alzheimers is in a place where she can be helped; a poor family that cannot afford the dog that their son desperately wants; a young woman whose heart has been locked away since a very brief marriage ten years ago.

It's a quick, feel good read to be enjoyed by the lights of the Christmas tree.

76msf59
des. 15, 2015, 9:37am

Morning Janet! Just checking in. Looking forward to Girl Waits With Gun. My LT pals seem to like that one.

Hooray for Maggie Smith!!

77streamsong
Editat: des. 29, 2015, 10:37am

Like a lot of other people, I'm thinking about my reading for next year.

Goal: 104 books (two per week); 50 of them ROOTS (acquired before 1/1/16)

I don't want to 'slot in' more than half my reading; I need to be able to whimsically choose - New books, and Book Bullets, and Review Copies, Oh My!

Here's my general plan so far
1. RL Brown Bag Book Club
2.Western Authors Challenge: Minimum one book chosen from the three challenges per month -
- A. AAC
- B. BAC
- C. CAC
3. Geocat - (didn't read much world fiction last year)
4. Dewey Cat - (to help me get through my non-fiction TBR pile)

5. ROOTS: Goal 4/ month
- A.
- B.
- C.
- D.
1001 - 2 per month
- A
- B
Pulitzer Prize Winning (6 this year)
- A.
- B.

And I'm going to play the gorgeous Women author's bingo although I don't think I'll make a blackout - I'll go for counting individual lines:


78streamsong
Editat: des. 29, 2015, 10:29am

January Plans

Start War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy - group read, 1001, ROOT

1. Divided: The Perils of Our Growing Inequality - David Cay Johnson - BBBC
2. Robertson Davies, - The Fifth Business - 1001, library ABC - C
3. One Hundred Years of Solitude Geocat, ROOT, 1001
4. A Walk Toward Oregon - DeweyCat, 75'er's Nonfiction biography, ROOT
5. Without You There is No Us - Suki Kim - LTER, ROOT
6. The Beak of the Finch - ROOT, P , Geocat

1. Brown Bag Book Club Divided: The Perils of Our Growing Inequality - David Cay Johnson
2.Western Authors Challenge
- A. AAC - Anne Tyler - will add in if I have time
- B. BAC - Susan Hill & Barry Unsworth
- C. CAC - Robertson Davies, - The Fifth Business (1001, library)
- Kim Thúy
3. Geocat - South America - One Hundred Years of Solitude ROOT 1001 - audio from library;
- Possibly if there is time: Beak of the Finch - ROOT, Pulitzer
4. Dewey Cat - 000 - A Walk Toward Oregon - ROOT, -
5. ROOTS:
- A. One Hundred Years of Solitude Geocat
- B. Beak of the Finch geocat, Pulitzer
- C. A Walk Toward Oregon - Deweycat
- D.Without You There is No Us - Suki Kim - LTER
- The Most Wanted Man in China: My Journey from Scientist to Enemy of the State - Fang Lizhi - LTER
- Plainsong -
1001
- A. One Hundred Years of Solitude
- B. CAC - The Fifth Business
- Start War and Peace - also a ROOT
Pulitzer (6 for the year)
- Beak of the Finch

LTER: Yay! These are now ROOTS!
- Without You There is No Us - Suki Kim - LTER
- The Most Wanted Man in China: My Journey from Scientist to Enemy of the State - Fang Lizhi - LTER


79qebo
des. 15, 2015, 7:00pm

>78 streamsong: Beak of the Finch
I just read this! Turned out to be more interesting than I'd anticipated. Though I preferred Time, Love, Memory.

80streamsong
Editat: des. 16, 2015, 12:09am

>76 msf59: Hi Mark. Thanks for stopping by. I'll be interested to see what you think of Girl Waits With Gun.

>79 qebo: Hi Katherine! I had planned to read it several years back when you and several others were reading On the Origin of Species. But I still haven't done so. ;-) I'm glad to hear that it was interesting. I hope to actually get it read this next year!

81FAMeulstee
des. 17, 2015, 3:50pm

>74 streamsong: Did not know this list existed... have seen many of them, it might be a nice lead to pick some movies for long dark evenings ;-)

82streamsong
des. 18, 2015, 10:20am

> 81 Hi Anita! I'd love to see a list of 'best films' from anywhere-other-than-the-US, too. Let me know if you see one.

Yup, long dark winter evenings. Right now it's only light between 8 am and 5 pm. Three more days until solstice! Yippee! Even though it won't make much difference for a few months, it makes me feel better psychologically to know the days are getting longer a minute or two at a time.

83streamsong
Editat: des. 18, 2015, 12:46pm

.

84FAMeulstee
des. 18, 2015, 4:09pm

>82 streamsong: over here we even have an hour less light right now and I feel the same about winter solstice, so nice the days finally stop getting shorter :-D

85streamsong
Editat: des. 19, 2015, 10:21am

>84 FAMeulstee:, Anita, you must be even farther north than Montana, then. Snow and freezing rain forecast here all week. The fun thing is that with a full moon, there will probably be enough snow for me to ski around my pasture in the moonlight later this week.

A friend drug me to a cribbage club to learn how to play cribbage earlier this week. It was fun - a different group of people and the lady teaching me was very patient and a very good teacher. They meet twice a month through the winter. If anyone knows of a good cribbage book or website, I need to get somewhat competent quickly, if I am to keep going.

My deleted post above was about some trouble I am having with my eyes. I've been having double vision in the evenings, especially if I try to watch TV. Reading, not too bad. Computer sometimes sets it off. Lots of testing these past few weeks with no definitive answers - best case scenario is that it's something that will go away.

This week I finished listening to Junkyard Dogs, my favorite in the Walt Longmire series so far.

I started listening to Gilead. I've had a paper copy living on Planet TBR for several years. It's as wonderful as everyone has said, and a great December choice.

I also finished The Bridal Wreath, the first volume of the Kristin Lavransdatter saga. I enjoyed it a lot - girlhood and courting in medieval Norway. Swordfights and honor, love triangles and medieval Christianity mixed up with a lot of history and great descriptions of the landscape. I'm about halfway through the second book, The Wife, which so far, is less about Kristin and more about Norwegian politics and also the medieval church.

86streamsong
des. 19, 2015, 11:01am



101. A Guide to Navajo Sandpaintings - Mark Bahti - 2000
- TIOLI # 16. Read a book of nonfiction;
ROOT# 43/50; acquired 2006 = 9 ROOT points - 160/200

Navajo sandpaintings are an expression of Navajo religion and used in various Navajo rituals and are destroyed at the end of the ceremony. It's only been recently that the sandpaintings have been created in a permanent form as art. These artistic sandpaintings often differ in details from the ceremonial paintings in order to make them non-sacred.

They are amazingly complex. For instance, the cover painting shows Father Sky with celestial symbols and Mother Earth with corn (one of the sacred Navajo plants) and other earth symbols. Father Sky and Mother Earth are always shown as touching their arms and legs to represent the horizon where sky and earth touch. For protection, the painting is hemmed at the sides and bottom with rainbow bars and open to the top (East), the home of the gods. The open top of the painting has a bat to help protect the unenclosed top. There are multiple symbols of power.

I thought this book was a great introduction to the meanings within the drawings and their connection to the incredibly complex stories of the Navajo religion.

I had purchased this at the Heard Museum of American Indian Art and History in Phoenix, and so felt confident of its accuracy. If you are interested in Native American art or have been intrigued by the stories of sandpaintings in some of Tony Hillerman's books, this short introductory book may well be of interest. (Although I see that now there is an updated edition of this and that this one is no longer in print.)

87msf59
des. 19, 2015, 11:33am

Happy Saturday, Janet. I always wondered how Gilead, would play on audio. Glad to hear you are enjoying it. I may revisit it, in that format, at some point.

I also liked Junkyard Dogs!

88FAMeulstee
Editat: des. 19, 2015, 11:45am

>85 streamsong: Forcast here is still way too warm (well above 10 Celcius) and some rain.... we don't get much snow in winter and with these temperatures no chance at all.
Kristin Lavransdatter was the first (of very few) group read I did here on LT, way back in 2008. I did like it :-)

And congrats on reaching 100!

89streamsong
Editat: des. 20, 2015, 10:30am

>87 msf59: Hi Mark! The narrator for Gilead is Tim Jerome - and he does a wonderful job. There is a short excerpt on Youtube if want to hear him: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZY0hfHBE_Y

>88 FAMeulstee: Oh thanks for mentioning that, Anita. I picked these volumes up at a library sale in 2008, so although I didn't join the group read, I must have been influenced by the talk on the threads. I wonder if that is the record for a slow moving book bullet - seven years for the bullet to hit home! Also I was able to go back and find the 2008 group read thread. I especially am enjoying the comments on various translations.

Thanks for the congrats - I still have to read several from my shelves to get to my ROOTS goal. Not sure I'll make that one this year.

90connie53
des. 20, 2015, 12:55pm

Happy Holidays, Janet!

91arubabookwoman
des. 20, 2015, 1:29pm

Over here in Seattle, we're probably at the same degree of Northness as you in Montana, but maybe because we have so little sun in the winter due to the rain and clouds, we're usually dark by 4 p.m. When it starts getting lighter after the solstice, I also feel better, even if it's not really noticeable for a while.

92connie53
des. 20, 2015, 2:38pm

>91 arubabookwoman: I do too. I don't like the dark very much and the cold either. But it's rather warm here. Temps are up to 13 degrees C. It's supposed to be around the freezing point in this time of the year, so it's really not that bad at all.

93The_Hibernator
des. 20, 2015, 10:55pm

>67 streamsong: I read Persuasion a long time ago. I don't remember much about it except from the movies. I plan on listening to the Juliet Stevenson one this year during my women's classics year.

94streamsong
Editat: des. 21, 2015, 1:23pm

>90 connie53: Thank you, Connie! The same to you and your wonderful family.

>91 arubabookwoman: I think you're just a tad farther North than I am, but I think you must be right about the clouds darkening the skies. Nevertheless, I love the Seattle area. Every year I hope to make it over to somewhere on the Washington or Oregon coast, but it's been a few years since I've broken away and done it.

>93 The_Hibernator: Hi Rachel - Your women's classic year sounds very interesting. Good luck with it! I'll be interested to see what you read.

We've made it to the turn around!


95ronincats
des. 23, 2015, 3:35pm



For my Christmas/Hanukkah/Solstice/Holiday image this year (we are so diverse!), I've chosen this photograph by local photographer Mark Lenoce of the pier at Pacific Beach to express my holiday wishes to you: Peace on Earth and Good Will toward All!

96msf59
Editat: des. 23, 2015, 5:18pm

Merry Christmas, Janet! Have a wonderful holiday, with your family!

And may your New Year be filled with books and bookish friends!

97FAMeulstee
des. 24, 2015, 8:15am

Happy holidays!

98The_Hibernator
des. 24, 2015, 2:39pm



Merry Christmas Janet!

99PaulCranswick
des. 24, 2015, 5:34pm



Have a lovely holiday, Janet

100streamsong
des. 25, 2015, 10:14am

>95 ronincats: Beautiful, Roni! Merry Christmas to you, too!

>96 msf59:, >97 FAMeulstee: Thank you Mark and Anita. Happy holidays to you and your familiies.

>98 The_Hibernator: Wonderful, Rachel! What a sweet innocent image

>99 PaulCranswick: Love it, Paul! Have a happy with your Mum and gorgeous family!

101streamsong
Editat: des. 25, 2015, 10:16am

102Donna828
des. 25, 2015, 9:00pm

I'm going to pretend I didn't see that Bingo card upthread. I almost had a blackout this year but couldn't quite do it. I am in so many challenges, my head is spinning. I hope your Christmas Day was a special one and that the peace and joy continues throughout the upcoming new year. Happy Holidays, Janet.

103streamsong
Editat: des. 26, 2015, 2:46pm

>102 Donna828: Hi Donna- Thanks for stopping by and for the Christmas and New Year wishes.

I may have to give up on the Bingo card, too in >77 streamsong: for next year. So far, only one book that I have tentatively planned for January is by a woman, which seems like a bad start to the card. :-) Too many challenges! They all sound so good, I want to join them all. But, I also especially want to get to some of the ones on Planet TBR that I keep putting aside.

And with that I finished book #104 The Wife by Sigrid Undset. That completes my 75'ers challenge which was to read two books a week.

However, I'm still five (FIVE!!!!!) ROOT's away from completing my challenge to read 50 that were on my shelf before 1/1/2015. I have three in progress: Gilead on audio, the third volume of Kristin Lavransdatter entitled The Cross, and I am finally finishing Collapse by Jared Diamond which I actually started in 2014 and put aside. I can hopefully find two very short books to finish my challenge. If not, oh well. :-)

104evilmoose
des. 29, 2015, 12:07pm


Hope you've had wonderful holidays, and look forward to seeing your reading next year :)