SF Bay Area Librarythingers Message Board

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SF Bay Area Librarythingers Message Board

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1MindfulOne
jul. 25, 2006, 7:43pm

What part of the Bay Area are you most familiar with? I live in the South Bay but go up to SF for work sometimes.

2cygnoir Primer missatge
jul. 25, 2006, 7:47pm

I am most familiar with San Francisco, although I know parts of Marin pretty well after working and living there for years.

3kukkurovaca
jul. 26, 2006, 2:30am

I grew up and currently live in the East bay (esp. Oakland, Berkeley). I very, very occasionally venture into SF proper.

4spinningjennie Primer missatge
jul. 26, 2006, 1:15pm

North Bay, here. We rarely get down to SF -- us Midwestern hicks can't hack the traffic ;-)

5kukkurovaca
jul. 27, 2006, 11:50am

What are people's favorite area bookstores? I'm particularly fond of:

Berkeley
* Moe's (Of course)
* Other Change of Hobbitt (Sci-fi and mystery)

Oakland
* Walden Pond

6django
jul. 27, 2006, 3:03pm

San Jose here. I'm new to the area (from Austin) and haven't found as many independent bookstores as I'd like. I'm so happy to get these suggestions. I was disappointed that Cody's on Telegraph closed, but I do like the new one on 4th street.
What is everyone reading?

7kukkurovaca
jul. 27, 2006, 8:10pm

Welcome. Unfortunately, I don't know anything about the bookstore situation in San Jose, although I envy your public transit system. And I was certainly sorry to see Cody's go, although I got a nice discount on a couple of books (Knitting in the Old Way and Wandering on the Way) as a result.

I'm between physical books right now (a lot of my "reading" is now audio, because knitting eats a lot of hand and eye time), but I just finished The life of the world to come, by Kage Baker and the next on my list is *probably* Tim Powers's Declare.

8ursula
jul. 28, 2006, 1:57am

Hi everyone, I live in the South Bay and work on the peninsula. I was trying to get through American Bee but events have conspired against me and although the topic is of interest to me, I haven't been able to really get into it.

9django
jul. 28, 2006, 1:16pm

Love audiobooks...the ipod revolution has brought them into my life via audible.com. what's your source?
My favorite recent audio book was Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. I'm a sucker for a reader with a British accent.
Now I'm listening to Alice in Wonderland.

10kukkurovaca
jul. 29, 2006, 3:34am

I've started using audible recently -- I like how they let you download your content more than once if you need to. I've also listened to some material from librivox.org, which is a site where volunteers make audiobooks out of public domain material. I'm also experimenting with podiobooks.com, but the quality of the writing there is a bit iffy.

However, the vast majority of what I listen to is podcasts -- the Marc Maron Show (until it was cancelled), several knitting podcasts, some Mac and tech-related ones, etc. I really like the diverse, democratic world of podcasting.

I'm pretty sure that Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is the book most often tagged "unread" on LT, so congratulations. :)

11adanairy Primer missatge
jul. 29, 2006, 8:21pm

I am in the San Jose area. I have to tell you that losing Cody's is like losing a piece of my heart. All my time here (since 1979) - I have lived on the Peninsula or in the South Bay. But about once or twice a year - I left all I knew behind and would just drive up to Berkeley and head to Cody's and A Change of Hobbit and spend a day. I would get a lunch, a dinner, immerse myself in books, and then come home refreshed. The entire time, I wouldn't feel a need to say a word - I was lost in a world of my own - totally dedicated to the search for books. Sadly, with it closing, I finally find myself meeting someone that would understand this need, and fully share it with me in all the right ways.

Ah well.... we will form our own memories, I guess. But places like that - they just aren't opening up anymore.

12staffordcastle
jul. 30, 2006, 8:21pm

Hi

I've lived in the East Bay all my life, except for four years in Marin as a teenager.

Losing Cody's is definitely a blow, though the 4th Street store is still there, and very close to where I work.

Favorite stores - Moe's, Black Oak Books, Pegasus, Other Change of Hobbit, Dark Carnival, Borders.

Cheers!

13djmook
jul. 31, 2006, 6:58pm

I live in the East bay, have lived on the pennisula and the east bay. I gone all over the bay.

For books stores, I'm kinda disillusioned, finding that most stores have poor selections that are even more poorly organized. It's easier to find what I want online and I get it at a better price too. Still.... I do go into book stores anyway, if only to look around.

14kukkurovaca
jul. 31, 2006, 10:13pm

djmook, I personally find the thrill of discovery to be a huge part of the appeal of book shopping, and difficult to replicate online, where you can search directly for things. Also, some of my favorite books originally came to my attention as a result of purely physical circumstances -- for example, Kay Boyle's The Crazy Hunter caught my eye because New Directions had put it into an interesting form factor; it became one of my absolute favorite books.

15angelique_eeek Primer missatge
jul. 31, 2006, 10:59pm

I'm in the south bay (grew up here), but I'm in SF pretty often.

Hi Cygnoir! I've met you a few times, I'm friends with Char...

16djmook
ag. 1, 2006, 11:37am

kukkurovaca, that is the main reason I enter bookstores anymore. However I must say that there are plenty of means of book discovery online. Using blogs and social sites like Librarything I've discovered plenty of books that I have subsequently picked up on Amazon.

17kukkurovaca
ag. 1, 2006, 3:29pm

Fair point, djmook. And of course sometimes you simply can't locate a book physically in any reasonable timetable.

18kara2 Primer missatge
ag. 2, 2006, 6:44pm

I'm a South Bayer too. My favorite bookstore is all the way in the City. Does anyone else enjoy City Lights?

I don't know of any decent bookstores in the Santa Clara/San Jose area where I'm located. Any suggestions? Like djmook, I primarily use Amazon to purcahse books.

I only joined LT last night, and have thus far only added a small handful of my philosophy books. I hope to stick around for a bit.

19bill
ag. 3, 2006, 12:19am

I'm over the hill in Scotts Valley. Bookshop Santa Cruz and Logos in Santa Cruz have plenty to hold my attention. I like to cruise the stores in the City when I have the chance. Otherwise, I'm comfortable searching the web worldwide to find what I want.

20frailgesture Primer missatge
ag. 6, 2006, 8:31pm

Seems like I'm one of the few people here to actually live in SF proper? I live out in the Richmond, near Green Apple, which is where I normally go if I need to browse for something used to read. I work downtown near Alexander Book Company and Stacey's books, although I'll admit to buying most of my books on Amazon.

21peechuz
ag. 12, 2006, 8:02pm

Marin here... I live in Larkspur and we have Book Passages over this way but I don't go there often.

I prefer to go to used book sales and look for books through ISBN.NU. ISBN.NU connects you to all the main booksellers online including ABE which are really the small booksellers anyway.

22blacknwhitesalright Primer missatge
ag. 20, 2006, 12:27am

i used to live in Larkspur, and i loved Book Passage! A Clean, Well-Lighted Place For Books was fabulous as well, though i preferred Book Passage. CWLP is gone now, anyhow. Ah well...

My recent reads have been Anne Rice's Tale of The Body Thief, which really sucked me in with its sensuous prose and shameless (yet artful!) depression and ennui; Dude, Where's My Country? by the hilariously tactless Michael Moore; and now something a bit heavier but very engaging, Crypto by Steven Levy.

Crypto recounts the trials, pains and ultimately world-changing success of the cryptography pioneers who brought crypto out of its governmental intel closet and made it possible for people to engage in secure and fingerprinted transactions over Telnet and the Internet. Dense subject matter, to be sure, but it's well-written, gripping and dramatic.

Oh, and i'm living in Mill Valley for the moment, though i was in The City and will be again soon. :)

23Esta1923
set. 4, 2006, 4:16pm

Walnut Creek: actually Rossmoor (summer camp all year 'round for people over 55). Moved here after living on the shores of Lake Merritt in Oakland. . .big change. Listing books is leading to re-reading!!Esta1923

24gregtmills
juny 20, 2007, 3:57pm

North Berkeley off Solano Ave, work in the City.

My recent reads have been Bambi vs. Godzilla by David Mamet, Twelve Years by Joel Agee and The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb.

Twelve Years is fantastic. It's the memoir of James Agee's son, Joel, who was raised in East Germany by his American mother and his East German stepfather, a prominent writer and member of the Party Intelligentsia.

Very funny, poigniant, and well written.

25fjhansen
oct. 19, 2010, 3:59am

I'm most familiar with Fremont. I was born and raised here.

26snoosh
oct. 20, 2010, 1:20am

Raised in the East Bay, now on the Peninsula, and usually go to SF a couple of times a month.

27Esta1923
oct. 20, 2010, 12:41pm

Now living in Walnut Creek (more specifically, at Rossmoor) and remembering fondly many SF people, places, performances and food!

28sfzclibrary
juny 15, 2018, 11:17am

San Francisco Zen Center is in Hayes Valley, S.F. We have been here since the late 70's when the neighborhood was consider 'not desirable.' And now our neighborhood is growing by leaps and bounds and the valley is bursting with young urban folks.

Both our bookstore and Library/Reading room have local, regional, national and international 'foot traffic' to introduce books on the teachings of Soto Zen and other Buddhist traditions on a daily basis.

Our library has just reopened after a remolding project and insertion of Library Thing/Tiny Cat as a inventory/lending tool.

Our patrons enjoy the 'new' library and we are thrilled to be open and looking forward to the future.