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Imago (Lilith's Brood, 3) de Octavia E.…
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Imago (Lilith's Brood, 3) (edició 1997)

de Octavia E. Butler (Autor)

Sèrie: Saga Xenogènesi (3)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,1743612,706 (4.13)42
The stunning conclusion to a postapocalyptic trilogy about an alien species merging with humans--from "one of science fiction's finest writers" (TheNew York Times).   Human and Oankali have been mating since the aliens first came to Earth to rescue the few survivors of an annihilating nuclear war. The Oankali began a massive breeding project, guided by the ooloi, a sexless subspecies capable of manipulating DNA, in the hope of eventually creating a perfect starfaring race.   Jodahs is supposed to be just another hybrid of human and Oankali, but as he begins his transformation to adulthood he finds himself becoming ooloi--the first ever born to a human mother. As his body changes, Jodahs develops the ability to shapeshift, manipulate matter, and cure or create disease at will. If this frightened young man is able to master his new identity, Jodahs could prove the savior of what's left of mankind. Or, if he is not careful, he could become a plague that will destroy this new race once and for all. Readers of Ursula K. Le Guin and N. K. Jemisin will be fascinated by bestselling author Octavia Butler's thought-provoking and compelling vision of humanity.   This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author's estate.    … (més)
Membre:froxgirl
Títol:Imago (Lilith's Brood, 3)
Autors:Octavia E. Butler (Autor)
Informació:Aspect (1997), Edition: Warner Books, 224 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:****1/2
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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Imago de Octavia E. Butler

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[b:Imago|60934|Imago (Xenogenesis, #3)|Octavia E. Butler|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1389478182l/60934._SY75_.jpg|6589483] closes out the Lilith's Brood trilogy, continuing and building on a lot of the general world building set out in [b:Dawn|60929|Dawn (Xenogenesis, #1)|Octavia E. Butler|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1388290339l/60929._SY75_.jpg|1008111] and [b:Adulthood Rites|116249|Adulthood Rites (Xenogenesis, #2)|Octavia E. Butler|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1390116834l/116249._SY75_.jpg|249001]. This time around, we're not directly following either Lilith or Akin, but rather Jodahs, perhaps the least human protagonist of the series--as he will be the first human/Oankali hybrid that appears to be growing up to be neither male nor female, instead growing up ooloi.

It's a fascinating and weird point of view, especially given that he's even more alien than the ooloi have been all along--which is saying something. With his human traits, he has even more power to literally rewrite the genes of anything he touches.

The main theme of Imago is dealing with the alien and coming to accept those different than you. There's an expansion of Adulthood Rite's exploration of if the Ooankali are actually the good guys after all and what it means to for humans to survive versus humanity itself.

It's an interesting story if, as I mentioned, somewhat weird and a solid conclusion to the trilogy. I somewhat wish for an extended universe, to see the future Ooankali encountering other races, without even a vague grounding in humanity (Butler does alien well...), but it doesn't feel critical. The story feels both wide open and finished, which is not something one often gets to say.

Overall, I think I prefer Adulthood Rites over Dawn over Imago, but they're all solid. I think this is a series to put on my reread list. Amusingly, perhaps the shortest series on it. :D

As an aside:


Humans had evolved from hierarchical life, dominating, often killing other life. Oankali had evolved from acquisitive life, collecting and combining with other life. To kill was not simply wasteful to the Oankali. It was as unacceptable as slicing off their own healthy limbs.


It really does make me wonder if hierarchical life is actually as evil as the Ooankali claim--and what a non-hierarchical intelligent human race would even work. That's one of the things I love about sci-fi: weird thoughts that really make you think: what if? ( )
  jpv0 | Jul 21, 2021 |
The culmination of the Exenogenesis trilogy completes the examination of the three genders of this world: legacy humans who have managed to survive a deadly war on Earth; Oankali, beings who travel the universe to exchange gene material; and Ooloi, a third Oankali gender that breeds with the two others. Their habitats are Earth, with its country/spaceship of Lo ; Mars, where humans live alone in an atmosphere created for them by the Oankali; and now, new territory on Earth with the construct and birth of two human-Ooloi, Jodahs and Aaor. The Oolois' extreme sexual thrall to humans is startling here. Their possessiveness, though benign, edges into the territory they find objectionable in humans - their heriarchical nature. Unlike the other Oankali, Ooloi need only a human of each sex to mate - not an Oankali. Ooloi have amazing powers of healing every wound and genetic flaw of humans, but their obsessive nature is truly frightening. This series was already bursting with Butler's imagination in creating the Oankali and their world and their spaceships, but the ooloi/human construct is another giant step. It's a truly satisfying ending. ( )
  froxgirl | Jul 19, 2021 |
While this book started a bit slow, it developed a good story when the first alien-human construct seeks to find human companions. Like the previous two novels in the series, Butler does a nice job showing the flaws of humanity without being pedantic. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
Summary: The concluding volume of this trilogy explores what happens when human-Oankali breeding results in a construct child that is not supposed to occur.

Jodahs is one of Lilith’s children with both human and Oankali parents. Up until now all of these “constructs” mature to be males or females with a blend of human and Oankali traits. This appeared to be the case with Jodahs and its paired sibling Aaor until they began to metamorphose. They didn’t smell right to the others. They were changing into ooloi, the third sex of the Oankali (referred to as “it”). This was not supposed to happen and was potentially dangerous. Ooloi could alter DNA at a touch, indeed the structure of anything, and an imperfect ooloi could unleash organic destruction on the planet.

The sensible thing was to transport to the mother ship. The family takes the riskier course of leaving the settlement of Lo to an isolated place to allow both Jodahs and Aaor to complete their metamorphoses. In the process, Jodahs encounters a brother and sister, Tomas and Jesusa, afflicted with painful tumors that will kill them and much of their settlement–but they are also fertile humans. Using its ooloi powers, which are not flawed, it heals them and bonds with them. They become mates and help it complete its metamorphosis. Aaor is less fortunate. It needs mates too, and lacking them, it goes formless with despair, and is danger of dissolving, not a good thing

This leads to a daring action. The settlement the brother and sister came from had kept its existence hidden. This could not continue. The shuttles would come for them. Jodahs realizes he can play a key role in helping them end resistance, choosing either breeding with the Oankali or joining the human-only colony on Mars. The settlement also offers hope of mates for Aaor. But they religiously hate Oankali, and especially ooloi. There is a good chance Jodahs, Aaor, Tomas, and Jesusa could all end up dead.

Butler explores the unanticipated consequences of colonizing a race. The settlement of Tomas and Jodahs represents the human passion for self-determination, which clashes with a more powerful race that neither succeeded in keeping them sterile, nor could let them, exist as they were. Is benevolent intent from one’s own worldview sufficient when it violates the self-determination of others. Is using one’s power to shape the decisions of others so that they will accept what they need to do to survive acceptable when their self determination will kill them?

The capacities of the ooloi also raise questions for humanity as we are witnessing the dawning of new genetic technologies such as CRISPR, capable of possible healing of genetic disorders, but also “optimizing” human genetics or even changing our genetic codes, giving us new capacities. The ooloi seem capable of making perfect changes. Would this be so for us, and would there also be unforeseen consequences?

I came to the end of this book wondering why the trilogy ended here. To say much more would be to leave spoilers, but I thought this series could go further. Others see the emergence of construct ooloi as the culmination of the process that began in Dawn. I can’t help but think this may have opened possibilities the Oankali haven’t anticipated. But we’ll never know… ( )
1 vota BobonBooks | Jul 1, 2021 |
I loved this series (Xenogenesis/Lilith's Brood). The first book (Dawn) was a wonderful introduction to the series, but it's ending was extremely unsatisfying. After reading the second book (Adulthood Rites), I appreciated Dawn a little more, but I still thought its ending left room for improvement. After reading Imago, I am satisfied with the series as a whole.

Some thoughts:

The sexual differences and eventual relationships between the Oankali and the humans were unusual and took some getting used to. BUT I loved that each book primarily described the experiences of a different gender (female, male, and ooloi). I felt that by the beginning of this third book, you are prepared to understand what it means to be ooloi, which would have been a lot to introduce in Dawn or even in Adulthood Rites.

I also loved that this trilogy is multigenerational in terms of the amount of time that passes and the progress that is made (and the fact that there are literally different generations involved), but that many of the "first-generation" characters from Dawn remain relevant and involved in the story throughout.

One continued frustration for me (intentional, I'm sure) was the relationship of the Oankali to the humans. Humanity would have died out without these Oankali, but now only survives to participate in a "gene trade" with them. Anyone who refuses would be sterilized. Deciding how and if she will cooperate with the Oankali is Lilith's essential struggle in Dawn, and it remains problematic for her throughout the series. We discover the Oankali will essentially be destroying Earth when they eventually leave. The sterilized humans will have died by then, and those who have become part of the Oankali will leave in their ship. At the end of Adulthood Rites, the humans finally have some semblance of a choice in what will happen to their own race. Akin convinces the Oankali to allow humans to create a colony on Mars. So the humans now have three choices: become Oankali, resist and die, or go to Mars. There is a feeling of emancipation there.

In Imago, though, this frustration continues through the forced bonding and influencing the two ooloi constructs impose on their human mates and on other humans in the mountain settlement. It feels a little too much like a trap, and in the case of the protagonist and his mates, it almost literally was. Pretty rapey, to be honest.

All that being said, the author does an excellent job of portraying the Oankali perspective. What the Oankali impose on humanity is what they know to be best for humanity (Oankali definition of "best," but still...). You never stop believing that the Oankali believe to be acting in humanity's best interest.

Final thought: I strongly disagree with what is said to be humanity's fatal flaw. Strongly.

Anyways. It was a lot. It was an excellent series. Read it and decide for yourself. ( )
1 vota ctanons | Jan 26, 2021 |
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Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Butler, Octavia E.autor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Barlowe, WayneAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Kannosto, MattiTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Palencar, John JudeAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Underwood, GeorgeAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

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The stunning conclusion to a postapocalyptic trilogy about an alien species merging with humans--from "one of science fiction's finest writers" (TheNew York Times).   Human and Oankali have been mating since the aliens first came to Earth to rescue the few survivors of an annihilating nuclear war. The Oankali began a massive breeding project, guided by the ooloi, a sexless subspecies capable of manipulating DNA, in the hope of eventually creating a perfect starfaring race.   Jodahs is supposed to be just another hybrid of human and Oankali, but as he begins his transformation to adulthood he finds himself becoming ooloi--the first ever born to a human mother. As his body changes, Jodahs develops the ability to shapeshift, manipulate matter, and cure or create disease at will. If this frightened young man is able to master his new identity, Jodahs could prove the savior of what's left of mankind. Or, if he is not careful, he could become a plague that will destroy this new race once and for all. Readers of Ursula K. Le Guin and N. K. Jemisin will be fascinated by bestselling author Octavia Butler's thought-provoking and compelling vision of humanity.   This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author's estate.    

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