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RAISING THE STONES de Sheri S. Tepper
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RAISING THE STONES (edició 1991)

de Sheri S. Tepper

Sèrie: Arbai trilogy (2)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
783920,934 (3.95)24
A moving, compulsive science fiction novel from one of the best writers in the field When the human settlers arrived on Hobbs Land, the native intelligent species, the Owlbrit, were already almost extinct. Before the last one died, a few years later, the humans had learned a little of their language, their ideas and their religion. It seemed the natural thing for the settlers to maintain the last Owlbrit temple, with the strange statue that was its God. When that God died - disintegrating overnight - it seemed equally natural to start preparing its replacement. Maire Manone came to Hobbs Land to escape the harsh patriarchal religion of Voorstod, but Voorstod hasn't forgotten her - or forgiven her. But the men who arrive on Hobbs Land to find and return Maire to her homeland haven't taken Hobbs Land's God into account ...… (més)
Membre:adleonard
Títol:RAISING THE STONES
Autors:Sheri S. Tepper
Informació:Spectra (1991), Reprint, Paperback
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:fiction, sci-fi

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Raising the Stones de Sheri S. Tepper

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» Mira també 24 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 9 (següent | mostra-les totes)
4.5 stars, review to follow ( )
  Pezski | Jun 21, 2020 |
This is the second book in the Arbai trilogy, although it might as well be a standalone as knowledge of the previous book, Grass, is not needed, and any references to it in this one barely affect your understanding of the story. I’m not entirely sure when it takes place – clues seem to suggest several thousand years after the events of Grass, although human society seems pretty much unchanged. Which is part of the problem. Tepper’s targets are plain – abundantly so – which means the societies she depicts have to hew closely to present day ones, or rather ones derived from those extant at the time of writing. And Tepper was never afraid to push something into implausibility in order to make a point. So, on the one hand, we have the peaceful agrarian settlements of Hobbs Land, who have found themselves building temples to alien gods (actually some sort of alien fungus), but since it makes them happy and productive, where’s the harm in it? Meanwhile the patriarchal sexist slave-owning violent (seriously, they couldn’t be made more worse) Voorstodders, inhabitants of a region on another planet of the system, have triggered the final stages of their plan to attain apotheosis by killing all the unbelievers. Tepper was not one for subtlety and there’s certainly an argument the sf audience is incapable of processing subtlety – just look at the current crop of genre award winners… For me, Tepper’s novel are like a brick in the face, but I’d sooner there were writers like her than the books appearing on award shortlists these days. I plan to read more Tepper. You should too. ( )
  iansales | Jun 20, 2020 |
A black-and-white tabby cat came into the room with a live ferf in her jaws. She jumped onto the plinth and laid the animal against the base of the mass, then jumped down and left the room, purring loudly.
Two other cats came in with similar burdens.
"That was Gotoit's cat," Jep remarked after a time. "That stripey one. She calls it Lucky."
Saturday nodded and brushed the surface of the plinth with her bare palm, cleaning away the few scraps of scruffy ferf hair that remained on the stone. The bodies of the ferfs had disappeared silently into the
mass before them.
"The God was hungry," said Jep. "We're the Ones Who have to take care of that."
"I think the cats will take care of that," returned Saturday.
"How come the cats didn't take care of it before? With Bondru Dharm?"
"Bondru Dharm didn't know about cats," Saturday answered. "There weren't any cats here when Bondru
Dharm was raised. But we know about cats, and Birribat was one of us, so the cats will take care of
that. We're the Ones Who have to take care of all the rest of it."


I was fairly sure that I had read either this book or "Sideshow" a long time ago, as I was aware of the Hobbs Land Gods when I first read "Grass", and thought of them as being related even though the Gods are not mentioned in that book. So I was not surprised when an accident with a fuel pod in an early scene rang bells, and that other scenes seemed familiar as I continued. "Raising the Stones" is not a direct sequel to "Grass", and although the Arbai are mentioned, it is only as a lost race who died out long ago. When I got to the part about the Baidee religion being founded by a prophetess with an invisible dragon who came through a door from another world, I turned the page, then stopped and thought, 'What did it say her name was?' and 'A dragon-like creature that you can't see properly?' and turned back to read it again to confirm that it really was a link to the previous book.

The matriarchal society of Hobbs Land and the other planets was interesting, and I liked the subtle influence of the Gods on the people, although I wasn't keen on Sam. His conversations with with Theseus and roaming about the countryside with a sword at night confused me, and he was my least favourite character, but by the end I realised that the Hobbs Land Gods had seen him as redeemable but needing special handling to get rid of the parts of him that were warped by Voorlander influence and being parted from his father at a young age.

The Porsa made me laugh, especially when they were lured into the Noxious Substances waste disposal. If ever there was a species that could be classed as a noxious substance it would definitely be the Porsa! ( )
1 vota isabelx | Oct 31, 2013 |
Book 2 in the trilogy started with Grass... Not quite as enthralling as Grass but still excellent. ( )
  leslie.98 | Jun 26, 2013 |
(Amy) After my success at reading Gate to Women's Country, I thought I should try more Tepper. Well, not this one, apparently. Gah. I only read the 50 pages I make myself get through before setting down a book, so it's possible that somewhere in the next 450 it redeems itself, but I found the beginning - and what I could gather of the premise in those few chapters - to be a little bit like a failed Octavia Butler novel, which, no thanks. I'll read more Tepper before long, but this one is a big fat no.
( http://weblog.siliconcerebrate.com/zenos-library/2009/07/catalog_of_fail_june_20... ) ( )
  libraryofus | Dec 29, 2009 |
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Sinks whoever raises the great stones:
I've raised these stones as long as I was able
I've loved these stones as long as I was able
these stones, my fate.
Wounded by my own soil
tortured by my own shirt
condemned by my own gods,
these stones.

- George Seferis, "Mycenae"
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The God's name was Bondru Dharm, which, according to the linguists who had worked with the Owlbrit before the last of them died, meant something to do with noonday.
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Conspiracy is dark and dirty and vengeance is heavy as rock and being a slaver presses a man down until he can see nothing but black dirt around him, like the walls of a grave. Men become accustomed to that darkness when they are in the habit of death. It pains such men to come into the light.
A man who claims to carry the truth, carries an empty sack.
Perhaps, away from the pond, the frog would grow feathers.
p155

God does not know our names
any more than we know the names of our individual brain cells.

God is the overmind of which all minds are a part.
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A moving, compulsive science fiction novel from one of the best writers in the field When the human settlers arrived on Hobbs Land, the native intelligent species, the Owlbrit, were already almost extinct. Before the last one died, a few years later, the humans had learned a little of their language, their ideas and their religion. It seemed the natural thing for the settlers to maintain the last Owlbrit temple, with the strange statue that was its God. When that God died - disintegrating overnight - it seemed equally natural to start preparing its replacement. Maire Manone came to Hobbs Land to escape the harsh patriarchal religion of Voorstod, but Voorstod hasn't forgotten her - or forgiven her. But the men who arrive on Hobbs Land to find and return Maire to her homeland haven't taken Hobbs Land's God into account ...

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