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No Pity: People with Disabilities Forging a…
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No Pity: People with Disabilities Forging a New Civil Rights Movement (edició 1993)

de Joseph P. Shapiro (Autor)

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1675129,500 (3.93)1
Jerry's Kids. The Special Olympics. A blind person with a bundle of pencils in one hand and a tin cup in the other. An old woman being helped across the street by a Boy Scout. The poster child, struggling bravely to walk. The meager, embittered life of the "wheelchair-bound." For most Americans, these are the familiar, comfortable images of the disabled: benign, helpless, even heroic, struggling against all odds and grateful for the kindness of strangers. Yet no set of images could be more repellent to people with disabilities. In No Pity: People with Disabilities Forging a New Civil Rights Movement, Joe Shapiro of U.S. News & World Report tells of a political awakening few nondisabled Americans have even imagined. There are over 43 million disabled people in this country alone; for decades most of them have been thought incapable of working, caring for themselves, or contributing to society. But during the last twenty-live years, they, along with their parents and families, have begun to recognize that paraplegia, retardation, deafness, blindness, AIDS, autism, or any of the hundreds of other chronic illnesses and disabilities that differentiate them from the able-bodied are not tragic. The real tragedy is prejudice, our society's and the medical establishment's refusal to recognize that the disabled person is entitled to every right and privilege America can offer. No Pity's chronicle of disabled people's struggle for inclusion, from the seventeenth-century deaf communities on Martha's Vineyard to the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1992, is only part of the story. Joe Shapiro's five years of in-depth reporting have uncovered many personal stories as well. You will read of Larry McAfee; most Americans, assuming that a quadriplegic's life was not worth living, supported his decision to commit suicide rather than cope with a system that denied him the right to work or make his own decisions. Here, too, is the story of Nancy Cleaveland, a fifty-two-year-old woman with retardation who was forced to go to court to win the right to live with her boyfriend. And finally, you will read about Jim, whose long road to release from a Minnesota mental institution, with Shapiro's help, provides a model of what is wrong - and, occasionally, right - with America's social-service system. Joe Shapiro's brilliant political and human-interest reporting will change forever the way we see people with disabilities; all who read No Pity will recognize that disability rights is an issue whose time has come.… (més)
Membre:sandy_g
Títol:No Pity: People with Disabilities Forging a New Civil Rights Movement
Autors:Joseph P. Shapiro (Autor)
Informació:Crown (1993), Edition: 1st, 372 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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No Pity : People with Disabilities Forging a New Civil Rights Movement de Joseph P. Shapiro

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Es mostren totes 5
Very good synopsis of disability history! ( )
  CaseyHenderson | Oct 4, 2021 |
I went into this book thinking that I was exploring a new world of disability- after falling ill earlier this year. What I realized was that I had been disabled for a while, albeit in a different way. My problems with depression and anxiety had created barriers to success that I had just accepted as a natural consequence of mental illness. But this book talks about how most people who need disability rights might not even view themselves as disabled.

A cop with diabetes gets denied his pension because he takes insulin shots. A student with ADHD fails their tests, not because they don't know the information but because of the overstimulating exam room. In my case, a student with depression is expected to operate with the same style and pace as everyone else, and as a result under-performs. Then you add in my new illness, which has given me chronic muscle pain, fatigue, short term memory loss, and concentration issues.

Notice how these issues are usually not about the condition themselves, necessarily, but about a world that isn't accessible. This gets into the theory of socially constructed disability. As one activist I met on twitter put it: "We don't overcome our disability, we overcome you". The world is built under the assumption we all do the same things in the same ways, when that is far from the case.

This book is an excellent account of the history of the disability rights movement, which is a fairly new push for civil rights from a historically marginalized group. The internet has made this movement grow and strengthen exponentially, and it was the help of many excellent advocates that I even found this book. It focuses largely on the fights leading up to the passing of the Americans with Disabilities Act, signed by George HW Bush. These fights involved paraplegics, deaf students, the mentally ill, all sorts of groups. Combined, these people demanded to have their concerns voiced, and it was a true testament to democracy that it eventually worked.

However, it also outlines how contentious issues are within the community and how much we haven't done yet. Today, in 2019, someone on disability cannot get married. Couples have had to divorce so that somebody could receive the benefits they require to live. The ADA isn't properly enforced, as workplaces find new ways to discriminate against the disabled. Mental health stigma is not only still here, it's worsening as suicide rates increase and our president tries to track us down and label us by our diagnosis. It's perpetuated by media and culture, as people mock the president as "Psychotic" and call Republicans "insane".

There's so much work to be done, but this book is a fantastic foundation piece. ( )
  MaxAndBradley | May 27, 2020 |
An important introduction to disabilities as a civil rights project. ( )
  3wheeledlibrarian | Feb 23, 2018 |
"this book is extremely valuable as a survey introduction, and an exercise in consciousness raising. And for that alone, I praise it. But its utility is limited. An excellent place to start and a terrible place to stop, is what I'm saying."--Lightreads
  wealhtheowwylfing | Feb 29, 2016 |
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Jerry's Kids. The Special Olympics. A blind person with a bundle of pencils in one hand and a tin cup in the other. An old woman being helped across the street by a Boy Scout. The poster child, struggling bravely to walk. The meager, embittered life of the "wheelchair-bound." For most Americans, these are the familiar, comfortable images of the disabled: benign, helpless, even heroic, struggling against all odds and grateful for the kindness of strangers. Yet no set of images could be more repellent to people with disabilities. In No Pity: People with Disabilities Forging a New Civil Rights Movement, Joe Shapiro of U.S. News & World Report tells of a political awakening few nondisabled Americans have even imagined. There are over 43 million disabled people in this country alone; for decades most of them have been thought incapable of working, caring for themselves, or contributing to society. But during the last twenty-live years, they, along with their parents and families, have begun to recognize that paraplegia, retardation, deafness, blindness, AIDS, autism, or any of the hundreds of other chronic illnesses and disabilities that differentiate them from the able-bodied are not tragic. The real tragedy is prejudice, our society's and the medical establishment's refusal to recognize that the disabled person is entitled to every right and privilege America can offer. No Pity's chronicle of disabled people's struggle for inclusion, from the seventeenth-century deaf communities on Martha's Vineyard to the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1992, is only part of the story. Joe Shapiro's five years of in-depth reporting have uncovered many personal stories as well. You will read of Larry McAfee; most Americans, assuming that a quadriplegic's life was not worth living, supported his decision to commit suicide rather than cope with a system that denied him the right to work or make his own decisions. Here, too, is the story of Nancy Cleaveland, a fifty-two-year-old woman with retardation who was forced to go to court to win the right to live with her boyfriend. And finally, you will read about Jim, whose long road to release from a Minnesota mental institution, with Shapiro's help, provides a model of what is wrong - and, occasionally, right - with America's social-service system. Joe Shapiro's brilliant political and human-interest reporting will change forever the way we see people with disabilities; all who read No Pity will recognize that disability rights is an issue whose time has come.

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