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Lincoln at Cooper Union: The Speech That…
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Lincoln at Cooper Union: The Speech That Made Abraham Lincoln President… (edició 2006)

de Harold Holzer

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323262,844 (4.31)8
Lincoln at Cooper Unionexplores Lincoln's most influential and widely reported pre-presidential address -- an extraordinary appeal by the western politician to the eastern elite that propelled him toward the Republican nomination for president. Delivered in New York in February 1860, the Cooper Union speech dispelled doubts about Lincoln's suitability for the presidency, and reassured conservatives of his moderation while reaffirming his opposition to slavery to Republican progressives.Award-winning Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer places Lincoln and his speech in the context of the times -- an era of racism, politicized journalism, and public oratory as entertainment -- and shows how the candidate framed the speech as an opportunity to continue his famous "debates" with his archrival Democrat Stephen A. Douglas on the question of slavery.The Cooper Union speech, which was carefully researched by Lincoln and refers often to the Founders and authors of the Constitution, is an antislavery lecture, capped by a ringing warning to would-be secessionists in the South. It reaches its climax with the assurance that "right makes might." Long held, inaccurately, to be an appeal to the conservatives, Holzer presents Lincoln's speech as a masterly combination of scholarship, a brief for equality and democracy, and a rallying cry to the country and the Republican party.Holzer describes the enormous risk Lincoln took by appearing in New York, where he exposed himself to the country's most critical audience and took on Republican senator William Henry Seward of New York, the front-runner, in his own backyard. Then he recounts the brilliant and innovative public relations campaign, as Lincoln took the speech "on the road" in his successful quest for the presidency.… (més)
Membre:civilwarlover
Títol:Lincoln at Cooper Union: The Speech That Made Abraham Lincoln President (Simon & Schuster Lincoln Library)
Autors:Harold Holzer
Informació:Simon & Schuster (2006), Paperback, 368 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:*****
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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Lincoln at Cooper Union: The Speech that Made Abraham Lincoln President de Harold Holzer

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Es mostren totes 2
I consider myself a relatively boring person, in that I find interest in niche and obscure topics. Being a relatively boring person, I found this book...pretty boring. It has nothing to do with Holzer's writing or research, which is actually pretty thorough and rigorous. I'm impressed by Holzer's study of meteorological reports, and old train schedules.

At points the book does seem to be on such a niche topic that its length needs to be inflated. For example, there's substantial sections tied to the famous Matthew Brady portrait of Lincoln (Holzer ties to this to the speech that both concurrently "made" Lincoln's image). Additionally, Holzer spends a large amount of pages disproving or affirming various "Cooper Union Myths" (hardly a household name) that were told by Lincoln contemporaries (some are as mundane as claiming to have sat with Lincoln on the train when they didn't).

Personally, I found most interesting was the general thesis of the book (that get repeated over and over without too much analysis). Holzer claims that Lincoln was politically savvy and used the speech to remake himself as a sophisticated moderate that would be the best standard bearer for the Republican party. Whereas before, Lincoln was seen as a western stump speaker (who seemed almost radical with his house divided speech), the Cooper Union speech (and subsequent newspaper reprints, and following speech tour) made him credible in the eyes of the Eastern Republicans. Holzer's analysis of the speech (helpfully reproduced at the end of the book) is pretty decent, moving from historical rebuttal of Douglas's claim of popular sovereignty, to a condemnation of the south, to Lincoln's conclusion that slavery was a moral wrong that needed to be contained. Then again, most of this can be inferred by just reading the speech directly (which I do recommend, it's brilliantly structured and has a lawyer's taste for clever argument). Holzer does put into context what was at stake, as well as Lincoln's strategic stances in painting his position as moderate and historically accurate.

This book has a serious claim to being the definitive exploration on the Cooper Union speech. I'm just not sure that we needed a "definitive exploration on the Cooper Union Speech". ( )
  vhl219 | Jun 1, 2019 |
First let me say that the author does justify writing another book about Abraham Lincoln. Plus, he makes a good argument that this speech helped to make Lincoln president. More important he provides good evidence that without this speech and everything that grew out of it Lincoln would not even have been nominated.
The author makes good use of the different sources available in telling the story in chronological fashion. The use of letters, newspaper headlines and quoted dialog provide a variety that gives some pace to narrative history that some authors make dull. There are even photographs beginning with the the one taken by Matthew Brady the day of the speech. I enjoyed learning history by reading a small part of the biography of Abraham Lincoln. The more I learn about him the more I see him as a remarkable person. After the speech was given the sponsor group published a footnoted version of his speech. It took two people three weeks to thoroughly duplicate the research that Lincoln had put into his speech.
Reading the book I had the feeling that Lincoln was consciously running for President the whole time. He deliberately wrote a scholarly speech debunking his image as a western rube. Even though he began the speech by saying "Mr. Cheermen" in a high squeaky voice by the end he had connected with his audience and his voice was full and bold.
All of the audience, except the hardcore democrats, were amazed and moved by the speech. It was published in all of the newspapers and sold as a pamphlet for many years. Lincoln went on to speak twelve times in fourteen days throughout New England using the same speech and turned down many requests so that he could get back to Springfield. Lincoln definitely accomplished his goal of improving his political standing.
The author's portrayal of 19th century America included all of the aspects of daily life, riding for days on a train with no sleeping accommodations, getting covered with mud from the streets. I learned that Lincoln was a temperance man and 80% of the white males, the only voters, voted in the Presidential election of 1860.
I enjoyed the book and recommend it for someone who has done some reading in this area. It was informative and entertaining. This is a well written account of a critical event in the election of 1860 and I would look for other books by this author. ( )
2 vota wildbill | Oct 16, 2010 |
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Lincoln at Cooper Unionexplores Lincoln's most influential and widely reported pre-presidential address -- an extraordinary appeal by the western politician to the eastern elite that propelled him toward the Republican nomination for president. Delivered in New York in February 1860, the Cooper Union speech dispelled doubts about Lincoln's suitability for the presidency, and reassured conservatives of his moderation while reaffirming his opposition to slavery to Republican progressives.Award-winning Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer places Lincoln and his speech in the context of the times -- an era of racism, politicized journalism, and public oratory as entertainment -- and shows how the candidate framed the speech as an opportunity to continue his famous "debates" with his archrival Democrat Stephen A. Douglas on the question of slavery.The Cooper Union speech, which was carefully researched by Lincoln and refers often to the Founders and authors of the Constitution, is an antislavery lecture, capped by a ringing warning to would-be secessionists in the South. It reaches its climax with the assurance that "right makes might." Long held, inaccurately, to be an appeal to the conservatives, Holzer presents Lincoln's speech as a masterly combination of scholarship, a brief for equality and democracy, and a rallying cry to the country and the Republican party.Holzer describes the enormous risk Lincoln took by appearing in New York, where he exposed himself to the country's most critical audience and took on Republican senator William Henry Seward of New York, the front-runner, in his own backyard. Then he recounts the brilliant and innovative public relations campaign, as Lincoln took the speech "on the road" in his successful quest for the presidency.

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