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Grief Lessons: Four Plays by Euripides (2006)

de Euripides

Altres autors: Anne Carson (Traductor)

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265574,922 (4.31)7
Now in paperback. Euripides, the last of the three great tragedians of ancient Athens, reached the height of his renown during the disastrous Peloponnesian War, when democratic Athens was brought down by its own outsized ambitions. “Euripides,” the classicist Bernard Knox has written, “was born never to live in peace with himself and to prevent the rest of mankind from doing so.” His plays were shockers: he unmasked heroes, revealing them as foolish and savage, and he wrote about the powerless–women and children, slaves and barbarians–for whom tragedy was not so much exceptional as unending. Euripides’ plays rarely won first prize in the great democratic competitions of ancient Athens, but their combustible mixture of realism and extremism fascinated audiences throughout the Greek world. In the last days of the Peloponnesian War, Athenian prisoners held captive in far-off Sicily were said to have won their freedom by reciting snatches of Euripides’ latest tragedies. Four of those tragedies are presented here in new translations by the contemporary poet and classicist Anne Carson. They are Herakles, in which the hero swaggers home to destroy his own family; Hekabe, set after the Trojan War, in which Hektor’s widow takes vengeance on her Greek captors; Hippolytos, about love and the horror of love; and the strange tragic-comedy fable Alkestis, which tells of a husband who arranges for his wife to die in his place. The volume also contains brief introductions by Carson to each of the plays along with two remarkable framing essays: “Tragedy: A Curious Art Form” and “Why I Wrote Two Plays About Phaidra.”… (més)

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Es mostren totes 5
Skip Carson's glibly self-indulgent prefaces ("If you google 'revenge'..."; "There are days that are foggy in Venice..."; "is all anger sexual?"; etc.); the translations are readable though occasionally flatfooted compared to Arrowsmith or Vellacott. Alkestis comes off best. ( )
  middlemarchhare | Nov 25, 2015 |
Euripides is weird. Anne Carson isn't all that normal. But her translations are very readable, and her mini-essays are suggestive. The Hypolitus drags on a bit, but that's probably Euripides' fault, not Carson's. The best is probably Herakles, if you only want to read one. Better of reading Woodruff's Bacchae instead, I think. ( )
  stillatim | Dec 29, 2013 |
Recommended by fellow GRer Tom, who sounds like he knows what he's talking about.
  AlCracka | Apr 2, 2013 |
Every time I encounter a classical text I haven't read before, I am smacked in the face afresh by how on crack these texts are. Like, I'm USED to the crack of Homer, I'm USED to the crack of Ovid and Vergil, I'm USED to the total crack of everything I read & retained from my various classics courses. But somehow I had not encountered "Hippolytus" or "Alketis" before, and holy WOW are they on CRACK.

Like, I cannot even wrap my head around what happened in those stories. They make no sense.

Carson's translations are gorgeous, of course, as Carson's work so reliably is, and her short introductory essays are evocative and haunting. I would highly recommend this if you have a good supply of acid or a high tolerance for WTF. ( )
  cricketbats | Mar 30, 2013 |
I'd read about this book on the bookslut blog, I think, and bought it on a bit of a whim. It sounded interesting, and sometimes I try to read things outside my comfort zone. As I usually am when I do this, I'm glad I did it.

The translation reads very modern without sounding off. The plays seem fresh and like they matter, and the book's title, "Grief Lessons", seems all too apt. Whether it's Herakles or Hekabe or Hippolytos or Alkestis' husband - grief is palpable throughout the plays' tragedies.

The introductions to the plays were helpful and insightful, and in a way the two framing essays were the highpoints of the book for me. A good book, one that doesn't leave your mind so quickly. ( )
  atia | Nov 3, 2008 |
Es mostren totes 5
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Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Euripidesautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Carson, AnneTraductorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
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This is a collection of Alcestis; Hecabe; Heracles; and Hippolytos. Please do not combine with editions featuring a different selection of plays.
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Now in paperback. Euripides, the last of the three great tragedians of ancient Athens, reached the height of his renown during the disastrous Peloponnesian War, when democratic Athens was brought down by its own outsized ambitions. “Euripides,” the classicist Bernard Knox has written, “was born never to live in peace with himself and to prevent the rest of mankind from doing so.” His plays were shockers: he unmasked heroes, revealing them as foolish and savage, and he wrote about the powerless–women and children, slaves and barbarians–for whom tragedy was not so much exceptional as unending. Euripides’ plays rarely won first prize in the great democratic competitions of ancient Athens, but their combustible mixture of realism and extremism fascinated audiences throughout the Greek world. In the last days of the Peloponnesian War, Athenian prisoners held captive in far-off Sicily were said to have won their freedom by reciting snatches of Euripides’ latest tragedies. Four of those tragedies are presented here in new translations by the contemporary poet and classicist Anne Carson. They are Herakles, in which the hero swaggers home to destroy his own family; Hekabe, set after the Trojan War, in which Hektor’s widow takes vengeance on her Greek captors; Hippolytos, about love and the horror of love; and the strange tragic-comedy fable Alkestis, which tells of a husband who arranges for his wife to die in his place. The volume also contains brief introductions by Carson to each of the plays along with two remarkable framing essays: “Tragedy: A Curious Art Form” and “Why I Wrote Two Plays About Phaidra.”

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NYRB Classics

NYRB Classics ha publicat 2 edicions d'aquest llibre.

Edicions: 1590171802, 1590172531

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