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Batman [VHS] de Tim Burton
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Batman [VHS] (1989 original; edició 1998)

de Tim Burton (Director)

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297465,713 (4.03)No n'hi ha cap
A millionaire's son witnesses his parents' murder and grows up fighting the emotional trauma of that fateful night. To compensate, he develops a dual personality. During the day he's a playboy philanthropist, but at night, he become's the dark persona Batman, a masked crusader for justice. While fighting crime in Gotham, he eventually has to face an arch-criminal known as The Joker.… (més)
Membre:Pugdad1185
Títol:Batman [VHS]
Autors:Tim Burton (Director)
Informació:Warner Home Video (1998)
Col·leccions:VHS
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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Batman [1989 film] de Tim Burton (Director) (1989)

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Batman (1989)

Jack Nicholson – The Joker / Jack Napier

Michael Keaton – Batman / Bruce Wayne
Kim Basinger – Vicki Vale
Robert Wuhl – Alexander Knox
Michael Gough – Alfred
Pat Hingle – Commissioner Gordon
Billy Dee Williams – Harvey Dent
Jack Palance – Grissom
Jerry Hall – Alicia
Tracey Walter – Bob the Goon
William Hootkins – Eckhardt

Screenplay by Sam Hamm and Warren Skaaren
Directed by Tim Burton

Warner Home Video, 1998. Colour. 16:9. 121 min. Dolby Digital 5.1.

=========================================

Hard to believe thirty years have passed since we watched that movie in the theatres, is it? Thirty years! If we can still watch it, then it must be a classic. So it is.

I now do what other people only dream. I make art. Until someone dies. See? I am the world’s first fully-functioning homicidal artist.

It makes sense that Jack Nicholson is given top billing in this movie. He makes it a classic. You can keep Heath Ledger. I like him well enough, but his Joker is too serious. Jack’s is never for a single second serious, as any self-respecting joker should be, yet he manages to be scary and sinister virtually all the time, as this Joker must be. It’s a freakish performance, as campy and outrageous as they come, but endlessly entertaining and, for once, entirely appropriate to the character. The make-up department did an outstanding job with the Joker’s outlandish grin, but the rich repertoire of giggling and laughing, the elaborate choreography even in the most casual movements, the menacing stare that scares the life out of you, and the silky voice caressing line after line: all this belongs to Jack alone.

Take any Joker scene you like, there is something memorable in it. The only predictable thing about Jack is his unpredictability, and that suits no character better than the Joker. Consider the grand finale in the Cathedral for instance, complete with waltzing Vicki Vale around, a mock suicide with a toy gun, an acid-induced bell drop and quite a vertiginous showdown with Batman: “You wouldn’t hit a guy with glasses on, would you?” (He got punched hard for that one, of course.) Or consider the vandalism scene in the “Fluegelheim Museum”. Only this Joker can look wistfully after Batman, uttering the immortal line “Where does he get those wonderful toys?” And, surely, only Jack can keep a straight face in a conversation like this:

Vicki Vale: What do you want?
The Joker: My face on the one dollar bill.
Vicki Vale: You must be joking.
The Joker: Do I look like I’m joking?
Vicki Vale: Well...

There is really not a single weak moment in the whole part. But a few things more to notice. The electrocution of Rotelli: “Antoine got a little hot under the collar.” (Antoine actually got quite charred, but never mind.) The Grissom imitation to one of his thugs: “And, remember, Bob, you are my number one guy!” (If this was really ad-libbed, as the rumour goes, it was a brilliant improvisation.) And, of course, having just smashed his TV set with a remote-controlled boxing glove, the crowning piece of Jokerish humour:

Can somebody tell me what kind of a world we live in where a man dressed up as a bat gets all of my press? This town needs an enema!

“I was particularly proud of my performance as the Joker. I consider it a piece of pop art.” So Jack reportedly said. He did himself no justice. It’s a piece of high art. In other words, a giant piece of ham, but with eggs as well.

Even though Jack is, for me, the absolute star of this movie, he is not, of course, enough to make it a classic. Even Jack can’t save an essentially weak screenplay, as in the case of Chinatown (1974). But this is not the case with Batman. The movie is actually pretty perfect.

First of all, the script is excellent. It is very much like the Joker: plenty of trite humour along the way, but on the whole dark and violent. If you don’t expect what you shouldn’t, you won’t be disappointed. What you will get is a brisk, well-written story of the ultimate good guy against the ultimate bad guy, with a bit of romance in between. These are not characters. They are types, and so are the blond bimbo (Vicki), the obnoxious journalist (Knox), the corrupt cop (Eckhardt) and the inscrutable butler (Alfred). But they are all well-done. And let’s face it, the Joker is Batman’s best rival by far. I am certainly glad the script contains no cat-women, penguin-men and other boring monstrosities. I am even gladder we are spared this jerk Robin!

The production design is simply gorgeous. It captures to perfection the surreal and brooding atmosphere. The Cathedral is literary Gothic without being architecturally so, Axis Chemicals is like an illustration from the Golden Age of Science Fiction and all the better for that, and Bruce Wayne’s mansion makes all fairy-tale castles look drab. Gotham City itself, a depressing place where days are few and always cloudy, has never looked quite so impressively gloomy on the screen. The Batmobile is a stunning piece of bat equipment and so is the costume (“Nice outfit!”, even Jack Napier is impressed). The Nolan blockbusters made these things more spectacular. They didn’t make them better. (The Dark Knight’s Batmobile is actually quite an ugly piece of work!)

The supporting cast, that is everybody except Jack, is superb. Michael Keaton was largely considered miscast at the time, but it seems that he managed to convert most of the sceptics. “You’ve got to let the wardrobe do the acting, kid”, Jack reportedly quipped. Well, Keaton manages a remarkable transformation of voice and body language between Bruce Wayne and Batman, much like Jack does between his cool namesake and the flamboyant Joker. Considering that Batman is not the most grateful part out there (all the best lines belong to his nemesis), Keaton is memorably intense, especially when he does get some help from script:

Vicki Vale: Well, I mean, let’s face it. You’re not exactly normal, are you?
Batman: It’s not exactly a normal world, is it?

Keaton has his moments as Bruce Wayne, too. The most notable one is when he meets the Joker in civilian clothes, so to say, and in Vicki’s apartment of all places. Note how both of them say the same thing (“lots of space”) as soon as they enter. It is true. Both are not normal. Both are, in fact, psychopaths. The difference between them is one of degree, not of kind. The Batman of today, if he doesn’t control himself, is the Joker of tomorrow.

Last but not least, there is Danny Elfman’s terrific score, a well-deserved soundtrack classic. The haunting main theme that grips you from the opening credits has become so famous that the rest is often neglected. But it does contain much fine stuff. Give an ear to the choral extravaganza when Vicki enjoys (if that’s the word) a high-speed ride in the Batmobile and the colourful “Waltz to the Death” that accompanies much of the final scene. The latter is quite a nice piece of music, first cousin of sardonic masterpieces like Ravel’s La Valse and Liszt’s Mephisto Waltz No. 1. One of the great things about this movie is that we hear a lot of Danny Elfman’s music in it.

Last and least, Tim Burton must be given some credit for his effective direction. He makes sure the cast and the setting are always shown to their best advantage, and he handles the whole thing with an epic touch that suits the subject. But he was very lucky indeed to be in this movie. The production could have done just as well with plenty of other directors.

You can keep the overblown Dark Knight franchise to yourself. Give me this Batman anytime. Especially this Joker! ( )
3 vota Waldstein | May 1, 2019 |
An origin story for The Joker.

It's cheesey and cartoonish, but I don't care; it's the Batman I grew up with. Going back to watch this after Nolan's movies, it really becomes clear how this is just one level of campiness above Adam West. Also, what's with Batman killing people left and right? And the city thanking him for it? 1980s morality is f***ed up. And as much as I think Nicholson and Keaton are cool, this has got to be some of the worst casting ever.

Concept: B
Story: C
Characters: B
Dialog: D
Pacing: B
Cinematography: C
Special effects/design: A
Acting: C
Music: B

Enjoyment: A plus

GPA: 2.8/4 ( )
  comfypants | Feb 12, 2016 |
126 minutos
  Miquinba_F | Jan 21, 2012 |
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» Afegeix-hi altres autors (3 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Burton, TimDirectorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Hamm, SamScreenwriterautor principaltotes les edicionsconfirmat
Skaaren, WarrenScreenwriterautor principaltotes les edicionsconfirmat
Basinger, KimActorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Gough, MichaelActorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Hall, JerryActorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Hingle, PatActorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Keaton, MichaelActorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Nicholson, JackActorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Palance, JackActorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
PrinceRedactor/compositorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Walter, TraceyActorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Williams, Billy DeeActorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Wuhl, RobertActorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
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No n'hi ha cap

A millionaire's son witnesses his parents' murder and grows up fighting the emotional trauma of that fateful night. To compensate, he develops a dual personality. During the day he's a playboy philanthropist, but at night, he become's the dark persona Batman, a masked crusader for justice. While fighting crime in Gotham, he eventually has to face an arch-criminal known as The Joker.

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