IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Six Months in 1945: FDR, Stalin, Churchill, and Truman--from World War to… (2012)

de Michael Dobbs

Sèrie: Cold War Trilogy (1)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1523137,961 (3.86)2
A riveting account of the pivotal six-month period spanning the end of World War II, the dawn of the nuclear age, and the beginning of the Cold War.
No n'hi ha cap
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 2 mencions

Es mostren totes 3
Summary: An account of the six months from Yalta to Hiroshima and how the decisions and events of those months shaped the post-war world.

Michael Dobbs contends that the six months from February to August of 1945 profoundly shaped the post-war world dashing the hopes for world peace, replacing it with a “cold” war between the two major superpowers to emerge from the world. How did Allies against Germany become adversaries?

The account begins with the conference at Yalta in the Crimea. Planned to accommodate Stalin, it represented an arduous journey via ship, air, rail, and auto for a dying president and a recently ill prime minister. Neither Roosevelt nor Churchill arrived at the top of their game. What they found at the conference was a Stalin who was. Given that his country had borne the brunt of the war against Germany (and the casualties), he came with terms on which he would not yield about the borders and government of Poland and his influence in Eastern Europe. Dobbs shows how Roosevelt and Churchill, sometimes with vagueness of wording, tried to reach agreements about the shape of the post-war world that preserved self-autonomy for these countries and preservation of the unity of Germany. Roosevelt described their efforts as “the best I could do.” For Churchill, the handwriting was on the wall for his influence and the British empire. He recognized that he now was junior to the two great powers.

The second part traces the conclusion of the war, the race for Berlin, the death of Roosevelt, the linkup and the zones of occupation. The new president, Harry Truman almost immediately had to stand up to Molotov on the matter of Poland and honoring the agreements of Yalta. But as the old saying goes, possession is nine-tenths of the law, and the Russians were in possession of most of what they wanted. Amid all this, Dobbs captures the momentary joy of the meet-up of forces.

Part Three covers the conference in Potsdam, the tenuous balance of standing up to Stalin as an “iron curtain” descends on Eastern Europe and Poland’s government is dominated by pro-Communist leaders., even while Stalin’s help is still sought to deal with Japan. During the conference, Churchill learns that the elections he called turned him out of office. And Truman learned that the test of atomic weapons was devastatingly successful. Japan would be warned, resist, be bombed twice, at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and capitulate, even as Russia was turning back forces in Manchuria but was still short of all the prizes sought in the East.

A foreign service officer from the U.S. in Russia sent his famous “long telegram” with his analysis of Russian intent and recommendation of an American policy of containment, which became our foreign policy until 1989 (and may be once more). Reading this made me wonder if the combination of weariness and perhaps naivete of Roosevelt, and the divorce of military strategy and geopolitical assessment led to this outcome. Churchill saw this coming. But he was also the one so cautious about a cross-channel invasion. Great Britain and America’s late engagement, after the Russians’ years of fighting and dying and turning back the German threat left them in a place where all they could do was say “pretty please” to a country who held most of the cards.

For those whose knowledge of this history is a few vaguely remembered paragraphs in a history book, this is a detailed plunge into these six defining months exploring the personalities, the changing power dynamics, the events and the geopolitics that shaped the post-war world. The account balances depth and pace in a way that always fascinates and never plods. It demonstrates that nothing may be so dangerous as a charming vision of world peace between ideological and geopolitical adversaries. Yalta was the wake-up call, and Potsdam the effort to contain the damages. But the amity of a wartime alliance would be no more. ( )
  BobonBooks | Nov 19, 2020 |
This is a great over view of the period which set the basis for the cold war and shaped the world as it is today. Fast paced and well written. If you have an interest in the history of the last 60 years, this is a msut read. ( )
  bke | Mar 30, 2014 |
The title kind of says it all. The book begins with the Yalta Conference then Potsdam and ending with the dropping of the atom bombs. The theme is the relations between the WWII Allies and the men at their head. The coverage is almost completely political with very little of the military history events discussed.
At the Yalta Conference FDR is a sick old man with not much longer to live. The author does a thorough portrayal of Stalin seemingly expecting his readers to have the least knowledge about him among the Big Three. In my case that was correct so it worked out well. Churchill is trying to hold up the image that Great Britain is an equal partner when everyone knows that they are slipping.
There is a good use of primary sources including diplomatic cables and narration of the proceedings at the conferences. After flying to Teheran and having a bad flight Stalin insists on holding the next conference at a place he can reach by train, Yalta. The description of the living quarters at Yalta and Potsdam was extensive and interesting. Truman is in place at Potsdam which changes the whole chemistry of the group. It is at Potsdam that Truman received notice of the successful atom bomb test. Churchill left Potsdam to get the results on the British election and never returned, having been voted out of office.
The section on the Potsdam Conference goes into the horrible conditions in Germany at the end of the war. The communist countries in the new Eastern Bloc made refugees out of 40 million Germans who were relocated to fit the new Russian map of Eastern Europe. The friction between the Americans and Russians is already flaring up in Berlin as the good feeling between the Allies evaporates with the beginning of the Cold War.
The writing was rather dry with few of the human details of the situation besides those that tended to be depressing. Or maybe there just was not a lot of happy things in the situation to write about. The dropping of the atom bomb was not debated much at all. The U.S. had spent a lot of money developing this new weapon and they had few qualms about using them on the country that bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The book is adequate but I cannot recommend it highly. Three stars. ( )
  wildbill | Nov 9, 2012 |
Es mostren totes 3
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

Pertany a aquestes sèries

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

A riveting account of the pivotal six-month period spanning the end of World War II, the dawn of the nuclear age, and the beginning of the Cold War.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.86)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 11
4.5 1
5 2

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 158,013,299 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible