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Horologicon: A Day's Jaunt Through the…
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Horologicon: A Day's Jaunt Through the Lost Words of the English… (2012 original; edició 2013)

de Mark Forsyth (Autor)

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Do you wake up feeling rough? Then you're philogrobolized. Find yourself pretending to work? That's fudgelling. And this could lead to rizzling, if you feel sleepy after lunch. Though you are sure to become a sparkling deipnosopbist by dinner. Just don't get too vinomadefied; a drunk dinner companion is never appreciated. The Horologicon (or book of hours) contains the most extraordinary words in the English language, arranged according to what hour of the day you might need them. From Mark Forsyth, the author of the #1 international bestseller, The Etymologicon, comes a book of weird words for familiar situations. From ante-jentacular to snudge by way of quafftide and wamblecropt, at last you can say, with utter accuracy, exactly what you mean.… (més)
Membre:onymous
Títol:Horologicon: A Day's Jaunt Through the Lost Words of the English Language
Autors:Mark Forsyth (Autor)
Informació:Berkley (2013), Edition: Reprint, 286 pages
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Detalls de l'obra

The Horologicon de Mark Forsyth (2012)

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After The Etymologicon, Mark Forsyth wrote The Horologicon, a book with obsolete, but very entertaining and interesting words (nouns, adjectives, verbs, expressions, ...), arranged in clockwise order. Each chapter represents an hour or time frame, starting with morning and waking up. This goes into breakfast, work, lunch, teatime, shopping, going out, etcetera.

Applying his witty style to this book, mr. Forsyth managed to compile it all in a neat manner, where - like in The Etymologicon - each term/expression leads to an other, in a logical way.

As The Horologicon focuses on the English language, you'll also find that the discussed terms are related to foreign languages. I even saw a word that is used in West-Flemish: (to) skink, which means to pour (wine, water, ...). In the western part of Flanders, to skink wine, for example, is to pour wine into a glass. Or to donate something to charity. E.g.: Wie schenkt er wijn? Wie goat er win skinkn? The proper verb in Dutch is 'schenken'.

There's also a nice overview of the consulted works (old dictionaries and books). Added to that are the terms that mr. Forsyth didn't find in any of the dictionaries, or what he would call a dictionary, but he did mention where he got them from. At the end, and that's very convenient, is an index of all the old/obsolete words discussed in the book.

Like The Etymologicon, this book is far from a dry read. In fact, simply put, you could learn about language in a dry, academic manner. Or you can learn in a more loose way, with a slab of humour to make things more appealing and attractive. Less boring. Which makes you think why such ways of teaching aren't/weren't (?) applied in school. It would make the lessons much more fun. In my humble opinion. Of course, you won't easily remember most of the words in this book, unless you put your mind to it and study them. But it's a fun reference work, one you'll pick up now and then, if only to have an entertaining read. ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
1000 words you will never use. Not really funny and not that interesting. Somewhat intriguing because it shows what kind of things needed a name. ( )
  Paul_S | Dec 23, 2020 |
Forsyth's first book, The Etymologicon, was written with superb wit and prose and was a delight to read. I was expecting great things from this, and he has not disappointed.

This time the book is set over the course of a normal working day, and he takes you through you normal activities of waking, washing, breakfast, work, lunch, and onto the evening activities of supper, drinking and wooing and stumbling home. In each of the activities, he has mined old dictionaries to bring you words that are no longer in use. These are words that in some case have only been used in particular regions or were widespread, and are no longer heard. The story that he weaves in bringing you these words is beautifully written with humour and passion for his subject.

Some of my particular favourites are; expergefactor - anything that wakes you up. Nurdle - the small amount of toothpaste on your brush. Ergophobia - the mortal fear of returning to work. Quafftide - a time for drinking and lanspresado - a man who comes to the pub with no money. There are more, but these were some that made me laugh out loud. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
An improvement over The Etymologicon, this was quite an emjoyable and informative read. I think it is a safe bet that the reader won't be using many of these words in casual conversation. Nor in less than casual conversation, but they're still cool words to know.

For The Day's Jaunt, Forsyth has arranged his exploration in 19 hourly segments, with each looking at words related more or less to that time of day. Awakening, ablutions, breaking fasts, traveling (to work), meetings about "work", taking breaks, faking work, lunching, more "work", making others work, oops...tea time, finally doing work, just in time to leave, picking up necessaries and necessities, supper and libations, courting, going home, ...bed time. My summaries don't tell the whole story as there are numerous side studies in each chapter.

Forsyth's wit comes out more in this book than his first. Despite my glib thoughts about using these words in casual or serious conversation, any reader will be enriched for knowing them. I will read this again someday. If you've not read it, go find it and do. ( )
  Razinha | Sep 9, 2018 |
I absolutely love Mark Forsyth's books and this one was the last one I had of his to read. Its focus in on the lost words of the English language and he's broken it down into a parody, of sorts, of a book of hours. We start at 6 a.m. and learn about the words applicable to dawn and waking up, then proceed to travel through the day of work, lunch, shopping, and socialising, ending up in bed at midnight. All done with Forsyth's trademark humour.

Ultimately, I didn't love it as much as his other two books, the Entymologicon and the The Elements of Eloquence but it was still excellent and I highly recommend it for those that just love words.

He's also got a new book out, A Christmas Cornucopia : The Hidden Stories Behind Our Yuletide Traditions, which is, of course, on my To Buy list. ( )
  murderbydeath | Jan 8, 2017 |
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Therefore doth Job open his mouth in vain; he multiplieth words without knowledge.
Job 35, verse 16
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For my parents
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Tennyson once wrote that:
Words, like Nature, half reveal
And half conceal the soul within.
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Wikipedia en anglès (1)

Do you wake up feeling rough? Then you're philogrobolized. Find yourself pretending to work? That's fudgelling. And this could lead to rizzling, if you feel sleepy after lunch. Though you are sure to become a sparkling deipnosopbist by dinner. Just don't get too vinomadefied; a drunk dinner companion is never appreciated. The Horologicon (or book of hours) contains the most extraordinary words in the English language, arranged according to what hour of the day you might need them. From Mark Forsyth, the author of the #1 international bestseller, The Etymologicon, comes a book of weird words for familiar situations. From ante-jentacular to snudge by way of quafftide and wamblecropt, at last you can say, with utter accuracy, exactly what you mean.

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