IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes:…
S'està carregant…

Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes: Removing Cultural Blinders to… (edició 2012)

de E. Randolph Richards (Autor), Brandon J. O'Brien (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
5911333,411 (4.23)5
What was clear to the original readers of Scripture is not always clear to us. Because of the cultural distance between the biblical world and our contemporary setting, we often bring modern Western biases to the text. For example: When Western readers hear Paul exhorting women to "dress modestly," we automatically think in terms of sexual modesty. But most women in that culture would never wear racy clothing. The context suggests that Paul is likely more concerned about economic modesty--that Christian women not flaunt their wealth through expensive clothes, braided hair, and gold jewelry. Some readers might assume that Moses married "below himself" because his wife was a dark-skinned Cushite. Actually, Hebrews were the slave race, not the Cushites, who were highly respected. Aaron and Miriam probably thought Moses was being presumptuous by marrying "above himself." Western individualism leads us to assume that Mary and Joseph traveled alone to Bethlehem. What went without saying was that they were likely accompanied by a large entourage of extended family. Biblical scholars Brandon O'Brien and Randy Richards shed light on the ways that Western readers often misunderstand the cultural dynamics of the Bible. They identify nine key areas where modern Westerners have significantly different assumptions about what might be going on in a text. Drawing on their own cross cultural experience in global mission, O'Brien and Richards show how better self-awareness and understanding of cultural differences in language, time, and social mores allow us to see the Bible in fresh and unexpected ways. Getting beyond our own cultural assumptions is increasingly important for being Christians in our interconnected and globalized world. Learn to read Scripture as a member of the global body of Christ.… (més)
Membre:LyndseyHuckaby
Títol:Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes: Removing Cultural Blinders to Better Understand the Bible
Autors:E. Randolph Richards (Autor)
Altres autors:Brandon J. O'Brien (Autor)
Informació:IVP Books (2012), Edition: 1, 240 pages
Col·leccions:Logos, La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes: Removing Cultural Blinders to Better Understand the Bible de E. Randolph Richards (Author)

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 5 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 13 (següent | mostra-les totes)
A really good and interesting read. While I don't agree with everything they talk about and there are times where they get a little too speculative, this book points out some excellent points to be aware of when reading Scripture. The premises is that the Bible is written not in American English but in Hebrew and Greek and that it takes places in a time, place, culture, and location that isn't present day American. As a result, what our expectations are and what we want to read into the passage maybe isn't what the passage is talking about.

The book is great because it encourages an in depth, slow study of the Bible and causes you to "take a look around" when you read it. This book really knocks it out of the park. There are a few times where I wish they would have looked at things more in depth. This isn't a fully scholarly look into specifics but more of touch and go's on several broad themes such as collectivism vs. individualism, language, shame, time, etc. I wish there was a bit more focus on the Hebrew and Greek language although there is some parts of it discussed. There are also a few times where they make some assertions and, while they make the claim that a passage could include that aspect, they don't really prove it.

Overall, I've been recommending this book a lot and going back to it again and again. This is a good challenge and lesson to every Christian to check what traditions, bias, and presuppositions you bring to the table of God's Word. Final Grade - A ( )
  agentx216 | Aug 1, 2022 |
I started this book because a friend was reading it and was talking about it. The authors love for the Bible comes through as they help the reader understand how to be careful of our own cultural blinders as we read the Bible, how to avoid confirmation bias.

Anyone who reads the Bible to apply it to their lives should read or listen to this book (I listened on Audible).

They remind the reader - “We study the Scriptures, to paraphrase Paul, so that the “word of Christ [may] dwell in you richly as we teach and admonish one another with all wisdom” (Col 3:11, 16).” ( )
  DwaynesBookList | Sep 6, 2021 |
Opened my eyes to things I've been feeling but couldn't pin down. This is a great opportunity to how to read the Bible and get out of it what we should, not what we want.
  GretchenCollins | Dec 10, 2020 |
I approached Richards’ and O’Brien’s Misreading Scripture With Western Eyes a bit skeptically, as “Western” implies a binary East-West dichotomy that can be superficial. And I’m not crazy about dual-authored books, where frequent first-person musings such as “When I (Randy)…” or “I (Brandon) recall the time when…” are cumbersome and detract from the narrative flow. But the “Misreading” part was hugely appealing, drawing on my familiarity with Eco’s Misreadings, Bloom’s A Map of Misreading, and indeed the entire corpus of the hermeneutic and critical theory enterprise: is there such a thing as “correct” and “incorrect” readings? (Even an interpretationally liberal critic such as Eco argues this in the affirmative in Interpretation and Overinterpretation, but I digress).

Richards and O’Brien begin their work with a Bible passage well known to many Christians: Revelation 3:15-16. Speaking to the church of the Laodiceans, the risen Jesus says: “I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot. I wish you were either one or the other! So because you are lukewarm—neither hot nor cold—I am about to spit you out of my mouth.” The point of this verse appears straightforward, but the authors note (based on a trip there in 2002) that Hieropolis, a city to the north of Laodicea, was known then (and still is) for its hot springs, whereas Collossae, to the south, was known for its cold spring. Water from both, carried by aqueduct to Laodicea, was lukewarm by the time it arrived. “I suspect the Lord’s warning was clear to the Laodiceans. He wished his people were hot (like the salubrious waters of Hierapolis) or cold (like the refreshing waters of Colossae). Instead, their discipleship was unremarkable” (10).

The book is broken into three parts (“Above the Surface”, “Just Below the Surface”, and “Deep Below the Surface”), each comprised of three chapters. The book is peppered with examples of anecdotal differences between so-called “Eastern” and “Western” modes of Biblical interpretation (one of the authors was a missionary in Indonesia). Each chapter contains a headlined “Conclusion” and is followed by a “Questions to Ponder” section.

In the book’s conclusion, titled “Three Easy Steps for Removing Our Cultural Blinders?” (phrased in the form of a question, as one of the authors’ international friends pointed out the “Westernness” of declaring three easy steps), Richards and O’Brien devote a few paragraphs to each of the following topics: “Embrace Complexity”, “Beware of Overcorrection”, “Be Teachable”, “Embrace Error”, and “Read Together”. They state their agenda: “We’re trying to help you become a certain kind of reader: the kind of reader who is increasingly aware of his or her cultural assumptions” (212). There are a few endnotes, and a very helpful “Resources for Further Exploration” organized by chapter, as well as a Scripture index.

While Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes lacks overt or scholarly hermeneutic principles or theory, its general message of looking beyond the meaning of the text for signs of cultural influence is one about which all Bible readers and interpreters should be vigilant. ( )
  RAD66 | Nov 12, 2020 |
Dare I say this was a delightful book. Would it be better to say it is insightful?

There are perhaps half a dozen ways that westerners misread scriptures clearly explained in this book.

It is definitely worth rereading as a reminder to think of other meanings in the Biblical text. The kindle edition is so inexpensive that it would be easy to get it even though we already have the paperback edition.

“C. S. Lewis in his now-classic introduction to Athanasius’s On the Incarnation. Lewis advises readers to read at least one old book for every three new ones. Here is his reason: “Every age has it’s own outlook. It is especially good at seeing certain truths and especially liable to make certain mistakes. We all, therefore, need the books that will correct the characteristic mistakes of our own period. And that means the old books. … Not, of course, that there is any magic about the past. People were no cleverer then than they are now; they made as many mistakes as we. But not the same mistakes.” (Page 49) ( )
  bread2u | Jul 1, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 13 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

» Afegeix-hi altres autors

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Richards, E. RandolphAutorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
O'Brien, Brandon J.Autorautor principaltotes les edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

Cap

What was clear to the original readers of Scripture is not always clear to us. Because of the cultural distance between the biblical world and our contemporary setting, we often bring modern Western biases to the text. For example: When Western readers hear Paul exhorting women to "dress modestly," we automatically think in terms of sexual modesty. But most women in that culture would never wear racy clothing. The context suggests that Paul is likely more concerned about economic modesty--that Christian women not flaunt their wealth through expensive clothes, braided hair, and gold jewelry. Some readers might assume that Moses married "below himself" because his wife was a dark-skinned Cushite. Actually, Hebrews were the slave race, not the Cushites, who were highly respected. Aaron and Miriam probably thought Moses was being presumptuous by marrying "above himself." Western individualism leads us to assume that Mary and Joseph traveled alone to Bethlehem. What went without saying was that they were likely accompanied by a large entourage of extended family. Biblical scholars Brandon O'Brien and Randy Richards shed light on the ways that Western readers often misunderstand the cultural dynamics of the Bible. They identify nine key areas where modern Westerners have significantly different assumptions about what might be going on in a text. Drawing on their own cross cultural experience in global mission, O'Brien and Richards show how better self-awareness and understanding of cultural differences in language, time, and social mores allow us to see the Bible in fresh and unexpected ways. Getting beyond our own cultural assumptions is increasingly important for being Christians in our interconnected and globalized world. Learn to read Scripture as a member of the global body of Christ.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.23)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5
3 7
3.5
4 20
4.5 1
5 21

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 174,244,795 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible