IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Has donat un cop d'ull al SantaThing, la tradició de fer-se regals de LibraryThing?
ignora
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

The Looming Tower: Al Qaeda and the Road to…
S'està carregant…

The Looming Tower: Al Qaeda and the Road to 9/11 (2006 original; edició 2007)

de Lawrence Wright (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
2,944723,602 (4.29)83
A sweeping narrative history of the events leading to 9/11, a groundbreaking look at the people and ideas, the terrorist plans and the Western intelligence failures that culminated in the assault on America. Lawrence Wright's remarkable book is based on five years of research and hundreds of interviews that he conducted in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sudan, England, France, Germany, Spain, and the United States. The Looming Tower achieves an unprecedented level of intimacy and insight by telling the story through the interweaving lives of four men: the two leaders of al-Qaeda, Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri; the FBI's counterterrorism chief, John O'Neill; and the former head of Saudi intelligence, Prince Turki al-Faisal. As these lives unfold, we see revealed: the crosscurrents of modern Islam that helped to radicalize Zawahiri and bin Laden . . . the birth of al-Qaeda and its unsteady development into an organization capable of the American embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania and the attack on the USS Cole . . . O'Neill's heroic efforts to track al-Qaeda before 9/11, and his tragic death in the World Trade towers . . . Prince Turki's transformation from bin Laden's ally to his enemy . . . the failures of the FBI, CIA, and NSA to share intelligence that might have prevented the 9/11 attacks. The Looming Tower broadens and deepens our knowledge of these signal events by taking us behind the scenes. Here is Sayyid Qutb, founder of the modern Islamist movement, lonely and despairing as he meets Western culture up close in 1940s America; the privileged childhoods of bin Laden and Zawahiri; family life in the al-Qaeda compounds of Sudan and Afghanistan; O'Neill's high-wire act in balancing his all-consuming career with his equally entangling personal life-he was living with three women, each of them unaware of the others' existence-and the nitty-gritty of turf battles among U.S. intelligence agencies. Brilliantly conceived and written, The Looming Tower draws all elements of the story into a galvanizing narrative that adds immeasurably to our understanding of how we arrived at September 11, 2001. The richness of its new information, and the depth of its perceptions, can help us deal more wisely and effectively with the continuing terrorist threat.… (més)
Membre:DajanaCrockett
Títol:The Looming Tower: Al Qaeda and the Road to 9/11
Autors:Lawrence Wright (Autor)
Informació:Vintage (2007), Edition: Illustrated, 592 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca, Per llegir
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Informació de l'obra

L'Amenaça de la torre : com Al-Qaida va preparar l'11 M de Lawrence Wright (2006)

  1. 40
    102 Minutes: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers de Jim Dwyer (peacemover)
    peacemover: Now that you have read who is behind 9/11 and why they did it, now read about the people in the towers- where they came from, and their struggles to survive.
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 83 mencions

This book was first published in 2006 following a five year research project beginning in the aftermath of the disasters of September 11th, 2001. I purchased the paperback version in 2012 and it occupied a place on my bookshelves for nine years before I committed to finally read it on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of 9/11. When the first plane hit the north tower I was in a meeting at the Boston Park Plaza hotel. The purpose of the meeting was to begin the process of building a joint plan between the insurance company I worked for and another company that had completed the purchase of a large book of our business. During one of the breakout sessions a second plane hit the south tower and my instant reaction was that we were at war and I told the group I was with that bin Laden was behind this. I couldn't recall the name al Qaeda at the time. When we went back to the plenary meeting, the project manager who was running the meeting encouraged everyone to focus on the task at hand. We were meeting in a hotel that was a block or two away from the John Hancock tower. The gravity of the situation finally got through and it was agreed to postpone the meeting and everyone headed for the parking garages to get back to their respective offices. When we got to the garage where I was parked we encountered a frantic woman whose sister worked at the Pentagon which had just been hit by a third plane.

It was commonplace to note that the events of that day "changed everything". I wondered about that. About a week later I was browsing magazines at a Barnes & Noble and noted that the theme of the covers of both Time and Newsweek was "why do they hate us". My gut reaction then was "why don't they fear us". Twenty years later we have effectively declared "mission accomplished" and terminated our presence in Afghanistan (except for some imprecise number of Americans who haven't gotten out yet and thousands of Afghans who assisted our twenty year war and who will have to pay the forfeit).

Lawrence Wright won a Pulitzer for the The Looming Tower and for a change this was a work that deserved the prize and Wright deserves our gratitude for a wonderfully written, objective work of narrative history that gets to the "root causes" that the scribbling and chattering classes are always concerned with.

He provides detailed biographical sketches of notables such Sayyid Qutb, member of the Muslim Brotherhood, whose book "Milestones" was a seminal work in the development of Islamic fundamentalism in the second half of the 20th century. Qutb, like many of the lead figures in this story, spent some time in the West, specifically the Colorado State College of Education, now known as the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, CO. His first impression of Greeley is quoted by Wright. "The small city of that I now reside in is beautiful, beautiful...Every house is like a flowering plant and the streets are like garden pathways. One observes the owners of these homes toiling away in their leisure time, watering their yards and manicuring their gardens. This is all they appear to do." As time went on Qutb had less flattering observations regarding such mainstays of American culture as jazz, football and racism. By the time he returned to Cairo in August, 1950 following a twenty month stay in the US , Qutb's radicalism was reinforced by his encounter with the West and its mores. "The white man in Europe or America is our number-one enemy...The white man crushes us underfoot while we teach our children about his civilization, his universal principles and noble objectives...We are endowing our children with amazement and respect for the master who tramples our honor and enslaves us. Let us instead plant the seeds of hatred, disgust, and revenge in the souls of these children. Let us teach these children from the time their nails are soft that the white man is the enemy of humanity, and that they should destroy him at the first opportunity". Twenty years after 9/11 that quotation comes pretty close to describing the conventional wisdom in the American academy, much of the media, traditional and social, and a not insignificant number of the nation's political elite. Qutb eventually was hanged by Nasser's regime in Eqypt following his conviction of a conspiracy to overthrow the Egyptian government and assassinate its leaders.

In his second chapter, "The Sporting Club", Wright provides the background biographical sketch of one Ayman al-Zawahiri, founder of the Islamist terrorist group al-Jihad which eventually merged with al-Qaeda. Zawahiri's organization was dedicated to what one could call with a nod to Joe Stalin, "jihad in one country", specifically Egypt. . By 1998 his al-Jihad was on the ropes die to defections, arrests and revulsion against a terrorist attack on a party of tourists at an ancient Egyptian temple at Luxor. They were also on the verge of bankruptcy. So Zawahiri executed a merger with bin Laden and refocused the strategic target to be the United States as opposed to Mubarak's Egyptian regime. So who was (or is) Ayman al Zawahiri?

Unlike Sayyid Qutb, who came from modest circumstances, Zawahiri was the offspring of two of the most prominent families in Egypt. His father was a university professor of pharmacology. His brother was a dermatologist and "expert" in venereal diseases. An obituary for one member of the family, an engineer by trade, referenced 46 family members, 31 of whom were medical doctors, chemists or pharmacists. Among the others were an ambassador, judge and member of Parliament. An uncle of Zawahiri's father was appointed rector a al-Azhar University in Cairo, the consensus center of Islamic theology in the Middle East. Ironically, this ancestor was considered to be a great modernizer and was eventually driven from office as a result of faculty and student strikes protesting his modernist policies. Zawahiri's maternal grandfather had been president of the University of Cairo as well as the founder of King Saud University in Riyadh. He also served as Egypt's ambassador to Pakistan, Yemen and Saudi Arabia and a founder and first secretary-general of the Arab League.

Zawahiri's connection to Islamic fundamentalism came via an uncle on his mother's side, Mahfouz Azzam, who had been a student of Sayyid Qutb's in 1936 when Azzam was a third grader. As an adult Azzam became Qutb's personal attorney and was granted power of attorney by Qutb before his execution. He also was bequeathed Qutb's personal Quran. From his high school days Zawahiri belonged to dissident groups that opposed the secular regime of Nasser. He also supported the restoration of the caliphate which had been formally dissolved in 1924 following the demise of the Ottoman empire. It was intended that Egypt would take the lead role in conduct of an Islamic jihad against the West.

Zawahiri became a medical doctor, served as a surgeon the Egyptian army for three years and eventually landed in Afghanistan volunteering his services to the mujahideen. He regarded the war against the Russians as providing a training ground for the real enemy, the United States. Prior to his Afghanistan sojourn Zawahiri had founded al-Jihad which was a splinter group that broke off from the Muslim Brotherhood due to his rejection of the Brotherhood's willingness to use political methods to achieve its goals. His group was responsible for the assassination of Sadat and Zawahiri was among those arrested in the aftermath, was subjected to torture while imprisoned. His trial lasted three years which was the same length as the sentence he eventually received on a conviction for arms dealing. By the time he was released in 1984 he was in Wright's judgement a "hardened radical whose beliefs had been hammered into a brilliant resolve".

The story of Osama bin Laden is more widely familiar than most of the other prominent jihadists associated with the events of 9/11. It is less well known that his father Mohammed bin Laden was a self-made man of Yemeni origins who became the most prominent construction tycoon in Saudi Arabia after serving his apprenticeship working for Aramco who sponsored his fledgling construction company. He built hotels, embassies, and roads for the new capital city of Riyadh. He constructed a highway linking Jeddah with Medina and renovated the most sacred mosques in Mecca and Medina, tripling the size of the Prophet's mosque in Medina. Other than becoming fabulously wealthy Mohammed seems to have spent his waking hours siring offspring. He is supposed to have had 54 children born from 22 wives (only four at a time of course). He also kept concubines who occasionally lived with the family if they had his children. Osama came into the world in January of 1958 the only child of Mohammed's fourth wife, Alia, whom Mohammed had married when was fourteen. When he was still in his early childhood his father divorced his mother and married her off to one of his subordinates. When he was 17 and still in high school he married for the first time. His new bride was, like his mother, just fourteen.

The point of highlighting the backgrounds of Qutb, Zawahiri and bin Laden is to underscore the fatuousness of trying to explain away Islamic jihadism (or sharia supremacy in the phrase favored by Andrew McCarthy) in terms of poverty, lack of education and lack of opportunity. No doubt that payment of a stipend or salary to recruits to the jihad plays a role, but the animating spirit of jihad is fidelity to the fundamental texts of Islam and the belief that Islam is destined to rule the world. The leaders of the jihad are disproportionately drawn from the educated elite. They are medical doctors, engineers, university professors. The reason "they hate us" is that "we are not them". They hate the United States because it is the present world headquarters of "The West". They had us for our Christianity, our Judaism, our atheism, our skepticism. They hate us for our liberalism, our equality of the sexes, our materialism, our rationalism.

Wright follows the progress of al Jihad (Zawahiri) and al Qaeda (bin Laden) over the course of decades from the 70's right through 9/11. The story takes us to Pakistan, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, the Sudan, back to Afghanistan. He covers in detail the personalities, planning and execution of the assassination of Sadat, the first attack on the World Trade Center in 1993 by Ramzi Yousef, the nephew of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, plots to assassinate Pope John Paul II and Bill Clinton, the bombing of the our embassies in Nairobi (Kenya) and Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) and the attack on the USS Cole that nearly succeeded in sinking her.

Wright also devotes chapters to the efforts of the White House, CIA and FBI to track and frustrate the jihad, led respectively by Richard Clarke, Michael Scheuer and John O'Neill. O'Neill was eased out of his position at the FBI just in time to take a job in private security at the World Trade Center just a few weeks before he died in the collapse of the south tower on 9/11. Wright details the familiar problems of lack of coordination between the CIA and FBI with more of the blame falling on the CIA's unwillingness to share what turned out to be critical information regarding the participants in a planning meeting held by al Qaeda in Malaysia.

Among the more chilling and infuriating descriptions of the events of 9/11 is a recounting of bin Laden holding up three fingers after reports are received of the second plane hitting the south tower, and four fingers fingers after the reports came through of the plane crash into the Pentagon. The fourth finger was a reference to the plane that would target the Capitol building which was saved due to the heroism of the passengers on Flight 93,

So twenty years have come and gone since the day that changed everything. It took ten years to finally run bin Laden to ground. Zawahiri was rumored to be dead but resurfaced in a video released on the 20th anniversary of 9/11. Mullah Omar who declared the original Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan in 1996 and was wanted for providing sanctuary for al Qaeda (the raison d'etre for the Afghanistan invasion) died from tuberculosis in 2013. Omar Abdel Rahman, the "blind sheikh", who headed the Islamic Group responsible for the terrorist massacre of tourists at Luxor as well as the 1993 attack on the World Trade Center died in prison in 2017 in North Carolina from diabetes and coronary artery disease. Ramzi Youssef who planned the 1993 World Trade Center bombing is serving two life sentences in a prison near Florence, CO. His uncle, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, North Carolina A&T class of '86 (B.S. Mechanical Engineering) is still with us. He was captured in 2003, charged with war crimes in 2008 and his trial began on September 7th, 2021, four days before the 20th anniversary of his most spectacular deed on this earth. On August 31st of this year the US ended its military engagement in Afghanistan and the Taliban celebrated the re-establishment of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan. ( )
  citizencane | Sep 19, 2021 |
This book has been sitting on my shelf since it was published, but the memory of the events was still too raw for me to read it. I finally decided to read it this week. Wright does a very good job of reporting the lead-up, tracing two parallel stories: one of them the world of radical Islam, the other the halting US efforts to thwart terrorism.
Part of that second strand is the woeful tale of how inter-agency rivalry led to compartmentalizing the few indications that US agents had.
But the big takeaway from the book for me is the degree to which Bin Laden achieved his goal. His aim was to inflict a big, symbolic wound that would cause the US to overreact, invade Afghanistan, and get bogged down in a long, costly war. The US followed his playbook to the letter.
But there the fulfillment stopped. In Bin Laden's simplistic view, the sole cause of the break-up of the Soviet Union was its invasion of Afghanistan. For the moment, it appears that US resources are deep enough to avoid a similar dissolution. I hope. ( )
  HenrySt123 | Sep 17, 2021 |
I expected this to be a book focused solely on the 9-11 attack but I was very pleasantly surprised to find it was an in depth look at the history that lead up to the attack. I learned so much that I did not know and got insight into a culture I just did not understand very well. It is a compelling and interesting read. In many ways it reminded me of the recent Ken Burns series VIETNAM's first episode which delved into the long history of the region and gave you the background you must have in order to understand the events that follow. Fantastic book. ( )
  MarkMad | Jul 14, 2021 |
This is a book about the history of terrorism, and in a broad sense that of Islam itself, that all Americans should read. It discusses "what makes these people tick" through profiles of the lives of four men, including Osama bin Laden. ( )
  Jimbookbuff1963 | Jun 5, 2021 |
«Mas que história fascinante, aquela a que Lawrence Wright dá forma neste livro maravilhoso. A Torre do Desassossego não é apenas um relato pormenorizado e emocionante dos acontecimentos que levaram ao 11 de Setembro escrito com estilo e vigor. É uma análise profunda do mundo que produziu os homens que trouxeram até nós o 11 de Setembro e da sua prole, que continua, ainda hoje, a atormentar-nos…»- The New York Times Book Review ( )
  LuisFragaSilva | Nov 9, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 71 (següent | mostra-les totes)
A narrator doesn’t just tell a story; he keeps the listener company. Alan Sklar is good company—with a voice so distinctive that a blind man could pick him out from across the room.
afegit per readysetgo | editaAudiofile Magazine (Feb 1, 2007)
 
Wright, a New Yorker writer, brings exhaustive research and delightful prose to one of the best books yet on the history of terrorism.
afegit per readysetgo | editaPublishers Weekly (Aug 6, 2006)
 
In the nearly five years since the attacks, we’ve heard oceans of commentary on the whys and how-comes and what-it-means and what’s nexts. Wright, a staff writer for The New Yorker — where portions of this book have appeared — has put his boots on the ground in the hard places, conducted the interviews and done the sleuthing. Others talked, he listened. And so he has unearthed an astonishing amount of detail about Osama bin Laden, Ayman al-Zawahiri, Mullah Muhammad Omar and all the rest of them. They come alive.
 
Mr. Wright’s book, based on more than 500 interviews — ranging from Mr. bin Laden’s best friend in college, Jamal Khalifa, to Yosri Fouda, a reporter for Al Jazeera, to Richard A. Clarke, the former White House counterterrorism chief — gives the reader a searing view of the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, a view that is at once wrenchingly intimate and boldly sweeping in its historical perspective.
afegit per readysetgo | editaNew York Times, Michiko Kakutani (Aug 1, 2006)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (7 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Lawrence Wrightautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Sjögren, ÖrjanTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Sklar, AlanNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

Pertany a aquestes col·leccions editorials

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Pel·lícules relacionades
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic
A sweeping narrative history of the events leading to 9/11, a groundbreaking look at the people and ideas, the terrorist plans and the Western intelligence failures that culminated in the assault on America. Lawrence Wright's remarkable book is based on five years of research and hundreds of interviews that he conducted in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sudan, England, France, Germany, Spain, and the United States. The Looming Tower achieves an unprecedented level of intimacy and insight by telling the story through the interweaving lives of four men: the two leaders of al-Qaeda, Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri; the FBI's counterterrorism chief, John O'Neill; and the former head of Saudi intelligence, Prince Turki al-Faisal. As these lives unfold, we see revealed: the crosscurrents of modern Islam that helped to radicalize Zawahiri and bin Laden . . . the birth of al-Qaeda and its unsteady development into an organization capable of the American embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania and the attack on the USS Cole . . . O'Neill's heroic efforts to track al-Qaeda before 9/11, and his tragic death in the World Trade towers . . . Prince Turki's transformation from bin Laden's ally to his enemy . . . the failures of the FBI, CIA, and NSA to share intelligence that might have prevented the 9/11 attacks. The Looming Tower broadens and deepens our knowledge of these signal events by taking us behind the scenes. Here is Sayyid Qutb, founder of the modern Islamist movement, lonely and despairing as he meets Western culture up close in 1940s America; the privileged childhoods of bin Laden and Zawahiri; family life in the al-Qaeda compounds of Sudan and Afghanistan; O'Neill's high-wire act in balancing his all-consuming career with his equally entangling personal life-he was living with three women, each of them unaware of the others' existence-and the nitty-gritty of turf battles among U.S. intelligence agencies. Brilliantly conceived and written, The Looming Tower draws all elements of the story into a galvanizing narrative that adds immeasurably to our understanding of how we arrived at September 11, 2001. The richness of its new information, and the depth of its perceptions, can help us deal more wisely and effectively with the continuing terrorist threat.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.29)
0.5
1 1
1.5 1
2 12
2.5 5
3 50
3.5 15
4 213
4.5 56
5 238

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

Penguin Australia

Una edició d'aquest llibre ha estat publicada per Penguin Australia.

» Pàgina d'informació de l'editor

Tantor Media

Una edició d'aquest llibre ha estat publicada per Tantor Media.

» Pàgina d'informació de l'editor

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 164,323,907 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible