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The Evolving Self: Problem and Process in…
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The Evolving Self: Problem and Process in Human Development (1982 original; edició 1982)

de Robert Kegan (Autor)

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283277,592 (4.71)Cap
The Evolving Self focuses upon the most basic and universal of psychological problems--the individual's effort to make sense of experience, to make meaning of life. According to Robert Kegan, meaning-making is a lifelong activity that begins in earliest infancy and continues to evolve through a series of stages encompassing childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. The Evolving Self describes this process of evolution in rich and human detail, concentrating especially on the internal experience of growth and transition, its costs and disruptions as well as its triumphs. At the heart of our meaning-making activity, the book suggests, is the drawing and redrawing of the distinction between self and other. Using Piagetian theory in a creative new way to make sense of how we make sense of ourselves, Kegan shows that each meaning-making stage is a new solution to the lifelong tension between the universal human yearning to be connected, attached, and included, on the one hand, and to be distinct, independent, and autonomous on the other. The Evolving Self is the story of our continuing negotiation of this tension. It is a book that is theoretically daring enough to propose a reinterpretation of the Oedipus complex and clinically concerned enough to suggest a variety of fresh new ways to treat those psychological complaints that commonly arise in the course of development. Kegan is an irrepressible storyteller, an impassioned opponent of the health-and-illness approach to psychological distress, and a sturdy builder of psychological theory. His is an original and distinctive new voice in the growing discussion of human development across the life span.… (més)
Membre:Colleen.Los
Títol:The Evolving Self: Problem and Process in Human Development
Autors:Robert Kegan (Autor)
Informació:Harvard University Press (1983), Edition: Reprint, 336 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
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The Evolving Self: Problem and Process in Human Development de Robert Kegan (1982)

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I have read this book about five times. It continues to influence my thinking and lead me towards integration, of ideas, theories and the practice of psychology with human evolution. ( )
  nancymaguire | Jul 10, 2021 |
I'm very conflicted about this book. in the abstract, it's a fascinating study of human cognitive evolution as a continuous function -- though of its accuracy I'm not entirely convinced. In hindsight, it appears to explain a huge number of phenomena from my past relationships which at the time I considered almost inherently mystifying -- however, the strength of a theory is not how well it fits the past, but how well it predicts the future.

Unfortunately, Kegan seems almost enamored with Freud, and attempts to fit as many of his own models to agree with Freud's. Kegan's lack of skepticism in this regard strikes me as ominous; I can only wonder how much skepticism he has applied to his own models. While this not an explicit reason to disbelieve Kegan's theory of cognitive development, it is certainly sets off loud alarms. Most of the book's arguments come anecdotally, with a startlingly small sample size -- the majority of the book focuses on only three individuals, though Kegan says the theory itself is derived from "interviews with over 40 patients". Perhaps most damningly, the book relies *far* too heavily on large, incomprehensible tables spanning multiple pages with no visible signs of organization.

Though he does not formalize it as such, Kegan's theory seems to implicitly model human cognitive as a continuous oscillatory function, mapping from time to an axis of ego-differentiation/integration. Kegan states that these are opposite sides of the same coin, and strongly suggests that the ideal balance is the equilibrium between the two. The book offers some actionable advice on how to inspire transition between the cognitive stages, and how to notice the transition when it occurs. Furthermore, it suggests the reason that we are sometimes completely unable to see others' arguments is that they are aimed at a level we are not able to comprehend, let alone appreciate.

The final section of the book consists of advice for psychologists; it is entirely skippable for those of use who are not professional psychologists, and, though I am not an expert in the field, I would suspect it is indeed skipple for everyone entirely.

In conclusion: if you're interested in this book, read the Wikipedia page instead. You'll save yourself a lot of time and headache. ( )
  isovector | Dec 13, 2020 |
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Wikipedia en anglès (4)

The Evolving Self focuses upon the most basic and universal of psychological problems--the individual's effort to make sense of experience, to make meaning of life. According to Robert Kegan, meaning-making is a lifelong activity that begins in earliest infancy and continues to evolve through a series of stages encompassing childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. The Evolving Self describes this process of evolution in rich and human detail, concentrating especially on the internal experience of growth and transition, its costs and disruptions as well as its triumphs. At the heart of our meaning-making activity, the book suggests, is the drawing and redrawing of the distinction between self and other. Using Piagetian theory in a creative new way to make sense of how we make sense of ourselves, Kegan shows that each meaning-making stage is a new solution to the lifelong tension between the universal human yearning to be connected, attached, and included, on the one hand, and to be distinct, independent, and autonomous on the other. The Evolving Self is the story of our continuing negotiation of this tension. It is a book that is theoretically daring enough to propose a reinterpretation of the Oedipus complex and clinically concerned enough to suggest a variety of fresh new ways to treat those psychological complaints that commonly arise in the course of development. Kegan is an irrepressible storyteller, an impassioned opponent of the health-and-illness approach to psychological distress, and a sturdy builder of psychological theory. His is an original and distinctive new voice in the growing discussion of human development across the life span.

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