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More, Now, Again: A Memoir of Addiction (2001)

de Elizabeth WURTZEL

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
6821034,444 (3.65)4
I crush up my pills and snort them like dust. They are my sugar. They are the sweetness in the days that have none. They drip through me like tupelo honey. Then they are gone. Then I need more. I always need more. For all of my life I have needed more. A precocious literary light, Elizabeth Wurtzel published her groundbreaking memoir of depression, Prozac Nation, at the tender age of twenty-six. A worldwide success, a cultural phenomenon, the book opened doors to a rarefied world about which Elizabeth had only dared to dream during her middle-class upbringing in New York City. But no success could staunch her continuous battle with depression. The terrible truth was that nothing had changed the emptiness inside Elizabeth. Her relationships universally failed; she was fired from every magazine job she held. Indeed, the absence of fulfillment in the wake of success became yet another seemingly insurmountable hurdle. When her doctor prescribed Ritalin to boost the effects of her antidepression medication, Elizabeth jumped. And the Ritalin worked. And worked. And worked. Within weeks, she was grinding up the pills and snorting them for a greater effect. It reached the point where she couldn't go more than five minutes without a fix. It was Ritalin, and then cocaine, and then more Ritalin. In a harrowing account, Elizabeth Wurtzel contemplates what it means to be in love with something in your blood that takes over your body, becomes the life force within you -- and could ultimately kill you. More, Now, Again is an astonishing and timely story of a new kind of addiction. But it is also a story of survival. Elizabeth Wurtzel hits rock bottom, gets clean, uses again, and finally gains control over her drug and her life. As honest as a confession and as heartfelt as a prayer, More, Now, Again recounts a courageous fight back to a life worth living.… (més)
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Es mostren 1-5 de 10 (següent | mostra-les totes)
This book appears to be Elizabeth Wurtzel's Narcotics Anonymous Fourth Step.

It certainly comes off as a whiney diatribe.

Elizabeth Wurtzel is a fantastic author but a really needs to find another story to tell. In spite of her addictions, life has come too easy for her and it shows in her writing.

I would love to see her attempt a novel rather than her tired memoirs. Ms. Wurtzel’s considerable writing skills have been wasted on her rather uninteresting life story.

Overall, this story is only worth two stars, but the author’s writing skills make the book worth an additional star.
( )
  lynnbyrdcpa | Dec 7, 2020 |
I am a recovering addict so this book really hit home for me although her experience was very different then mine, they are all similar in some way and all touch us somehow. It was a great book that I couldn't stop reading and throughout the book and now that I see how many books she has written, I feel very proud of this girl who came out of the mess she was in and became a writer out of it all. I, too, never expected to become an addict but I definitely always aspired to be a writer. I am a writer now, though I am not a published one. I can't wait to start. No time like the present they say, right? Anyway, read the book. Its highly recommended and you will enjoy it even if you aren't a recovering addict. ( )
  diananagy | Jun 18, 2014 |
certainly, a depressing book. more so than Prozac Nation, but different enough that maybe it can't be quantified. maybe it's because she's older, maybe because it's more about treatment than survival, or because it ends hopefully. this is mostly about the writing of Bitch in various stages of being coked up.

"Peace of mind is no better than four years of high school French: if you never have occasion to speak a foreign language ever again, you forget it; if you don't live in Paris or Provence, sooner or later there's nothing left but that certain je ne sais quoi and this is what tout le monde is saying and, when all else fails, Parlez-vous anglais? I forgot to remember that feeling, and now it's gone."

it's a good book. i'm still not going to reread prozac nation, just the first three pages has me heading for a dark corner or a razor blade and i will not go there. but i have more respect for this woman's writing ability than i did when i started, and i'm curious to see what she does with Bitch, even if i'm reading her works out of order.
  omnia_mutantur | Dec 13, 2011 |
This author knows about a million words, I had my dictionary out the whole time... Aside from that, sometimes Elizabeth seems to be trying to convince herself that she really IS smart, pretty, etc. Still, an excellent memoir and deep look inside the mind and heart of an addict. I would recommend it to anyone interested in the subject, others might find it insufferable. At times it's hard to differentiate between her candor and ego, though. Loses one star because of too much wordiness, although I would highly recommend it to recovering addicts. ( )
  Rob.Larson | Aug 5, 2011 |
More, Now, Again may often seem like merely arrogant, spoiled brat, stream-of-conscious writing, but it is also an honest and accurate account of the narcissistic, contrived and ingenuitive life of an addict drowning in psychosis and a disengaged mind.

www.booksnakereviews.blogspot.com
  PamelaReads | Aug 5, 2011 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 10 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sorry, Elizabeth. Wake up dead next time and you might have a book on your hands.
afegit per timspalding | editaSalon.com, Peter Kurth (Jan 23, 2002)
 
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I crush up my pills and snort them like dust. They are my sugar. They are the sweetness in the days that have none. They drip through me like tupelo honey. Then they are gone. Then I need more. I always need more. For all of my life I have needed more. A precocious literary light, Elizabeth Wurtzel published her groundbreaking memoir of depression, Prozac Nation, at the tender age of twenty-six. A worldwide success, a cultural phenomenon, the book opened doors to a rarefied world about which Elizabeth had only dared to dream during her middle-class upbringing in New York City. But no success could staunch her continuous battle with depression. The terrible truth was that nothing had changed the emptiness inside Elizabeth. Her relationships universally failed; she was fired from every magazine job she held. Indeed, the absence of fulfillment in the wake of success became yet another seemingly insurmountable hurdle. When her doctor prescribed Ritalin to boost the effects of her antidepression medication, Elizabeth jumped. And the Ritalin worked. And worked. And worked. Within weeks, she was grinding up the pills and snorting them for a greater effect. It reached the point where she couldn't go more than five minutes without a fix. It was Ritalin, and then cocaine, and then more Ritalin. In a harrowing account, Elizabeth Wurtzel contemplates what it means to be in love with something in your blood that takes over your body, becomes the life force within you -- and could ultimately kill you. More, Now, Again is an astonishing and timely story of a new kind of addiction. But it is also a story of survival. Elizabeth Wurtzel hits rock bottom, gets clean, uses again, and finally gains control over her drug and her life. As honest as a confession and as heartfelt as a prayer, More, Now, Again recounts a courageous fight back to a life worth living.

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Mitjana: (3.65)
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