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Annihilation

de Jeff VanderMeer

Altres autors: Mira la secció altres autors.

Sèrie: The Southern Reach (1)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses / Mencions
6,4983741,512 (3.69)2 / 351
Area X has been cut off from the rest of the continent for decades. Nature has reclaimed the last vestiges of human civilization. The first expedition returned with reports of a pristine, Edenic landscape; all the members of the second expedition committed suicide; the third expedition died in a hail of gunfire as its members turned on one another; the members of the eleventh expedition returned as shadows of their former selves, and within months of their return, all had died of aggressive cancer. This is the twelfth expedition. Their group is made up of four women: an anthropologist, a surveyor, a psychologist--the de facto leader--and a biologist, who is our narrator. Their mission is to map the terrain and collect specimens, to record all their observations, scientific and otherwise, of their surroundings and of one another and, above all, to avoid being contaminated by Area X itself. They arrive expecting the unexpected, and Area X delivers--they discover a massive topographic anomaly and life forms that surpass understanding--but it's the surprises that came across the border with them and the secrets the expedition members are keeping from one another that change everything.… (més)
  1. 140
    Roadside Picnic de Arkady Strugatsky (Tuirgin, jeroenvandorp)
    Tuirgin: The Strugatsky Bros.' Roadside Picnic seems to be a touchstone of the Southern Reach Trilogy—and this continues with greater parallels in Authority. The styles of writing are entirely different, but the concept of Area X is a definite echo of the Zone. Roadside Picnic is a classic of European Science Fiction and well worth reading.… (més)
  2. 90
    Solaris de Stanisław Lem (ShelfMonkey)
  3. 50
    Acceptance de Jeff VanderMeer (LiteraryReadaholic)
  4. 40
    La mà esquerra de la foscor de Ursula K. Le Guin (andomck)
    andomck: Scientists exploring an alien environment
  5. 40
    Swamplandia! de Karen Russell (andomck)
    andomck: Swamps are crazy, man
  6. 30
    The Drowned World de J. G. Ballard (ShelfMonkey)
  7. 20
    Wool de Hugh Howey (thenothing)
    thenothing: dystopia, conspiracy
  8. 10
    Hothouse de Brian W. Aldiss (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: Classic SF that is all about its creepy, atmospheric setting.
  9. 10
    Wilder Girls de Rory Power (bibliovermis)
  10. 10
    Nova Swing de M. John Harrison (paradoxosalpha)
    paradoxosalpha: The infection/mutation of characters and their ambivalent encounters with transcendent power are in both cases oriented toward a mysterious region of putatively non-human influence.
  11. 10
    The Gone-Away World de Nick Harkaway (hairball)
    hairball: Maybe it's the fuzzy cover of the one book, but they remind me of each other.
  12. 10
    The Dream Archipelago de Christopher Priest (AlanPoulter)
    AlanPoulter: Both contain landscapes and people that play with with our sense of reality.
  13. 00
    The Last Letter (Conversation Pieces, Vol 31) de Fiona Lehn (psybre)
    psybre: Also set in an odd near-future (where an environmental disaster has made an entire island dangerous and soon to become uninhabitable).
  14. 11
    The Ruins de Scott Smith (BeckyJG)
  15. 00
    La pell freda de Albert Sánchez Piñol (FFortuna)
  16. 00
    City of Saints and Madmen de Jeff VanderMeer (g33kgrrl)
    g33kgrrl: VanderMeer's earlier world-building venture, full of weird-ass fungus war and other monsters. It's lovely and grotesque.
  17. 00
    Evolution's Shore de Ian McDonald (Litrvixen)
    Litrvixen: A strange alien vegetation begins spreading across Africa and transforming everything and everyone it comes in contact with.
  18. 00
    Houses of Ravicka de Renee Gladman (DarthFisticuffs)
    DarthFisticuffs: Both novels are about the exploration of a place in which the place defies explanation, and the exploration is more into how the space defines the self. Both novels are also very similar in tone.
  19. 11
    The Other Side of the Mountain de Michel Bernanos (marietherese)
  20. 00
    Oryx and Crake de Margaret Atwood (WeeTurtle)
    WeeTurtle: Different content but a similar vibe. Both books deal in human behavior, biology, and how well we fit into an environment.

(Mira totes les recomanacions 22)

Ranking (53)
S'està carregant…

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» Mira també 351 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 372 (següent | mostra-les totes)
!!!!TINY SPOILERS AHEAD!!!!

I enjoyed this book. It was a quick read for me, and I enjoyed the overall premise and setting especially.

I think I would have liked a little more explanation in this book and I did not exactly like the directions it took with the ending- especially where it became more cosmic horror than eco horror, so I felt a little disappointed with the book's big reveal, but I am still glad I read it. ( )
  annahuber13 | Jul 16, 2024 |
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/5803646667

It’s been a bit since I read Annihilation, but I’m surprised at how different this is from that! Nearly a totally different genre. Yet, the story picks up more or less where Annihilation ended.

I definitely had more fun with Annihilation. This book tries to feel a little more John Le Carre and doesn’t really get it, IMO. I had a hard time suspending my disbelief when it came to some aspects of the organization management / roles / responsibilities drama (which takes up a lot of this book). When we start using codenames like Control, Central, Voice, etc., some of the spy novelty wears off. Can’t say why, but it becomes far less interesting, to me. For example, there are a few things that are in question throughout big parts of the book (who ix X, what is Y, stuff like that). Yet, when they’re revealed, I am never that surprised.

The final third of the book is worth the much slower first third. The middle third is a transitional space. Once we get a bit nearer the ‘weird fiction’ of it all, the suspense elements return and it is far more interesting.

I’ll be interested to see how the third book continues on. It is clearly setup and that bodes well for a compelling beginning. I wish this had been a bit shorter. I also bumped upon the author’s use of sentence fragments as illustration’s of internal thought or whatever. I’m not sure if this featured so prominently in Annihilation, but I noticed it big time in Authority. ( )
  ThomasEB | Jul 4, 2024 |
[n.b. A ‘no star’ rating for books I review does not imply criticism—I rarely give ratings, as giving stars is an unhelpfully blunt instrument and all too often involves comparing apples with oranges.]

That VanderMeer takes a ‘less is more’ approach is embedded right from the moment the reader discovers that they will not learn the characters’ names. This sets out a ground rule—that you will barely get the amount of information you need, and not a comma more—and it reinforces the strange, strained relationships between the scientists, who will share a transformative experience without knowing anything about each other, and between their expedition and Area X, an intensely, compellingly weird landscape.

The story is a first-person narrative, the ‘I’ is a product of an isolated youth, an ‘expert in the uses of solitude’. This makes for an interesting point of view, especially here. The question of the reliability of the narrator naturally enough arises, but is more difficult to answer when events recounted never seem to amount to more than hints as to something else: the past, the future, a different interpretation.

The very first feature the four scientists encounter is the foot of a stone stairway that tunnels down into the ground, which the narrator stubbornly persists in calling a tower. The scientists are part of an official investigation into the ‘mysteries’ of Area X, but all they really discover, even those that survive, is that the mysteries are far more evolved than anyone expected. They entered the Area X territory in the hope of finding out about its mysteries, but three out of four do not survive their encounter with its unmediated reality. They arrive under instruction to record information about Area X but Area X seems, in its unexplained way, to be recording itself, keeping the scientists’ records as well as their remains.

By the end, the narrator has acknowledged the collapse of her "compulsion" to "know everything"¸and that even if she had clung to it, “[o]ur instruments are useless, our methodology broken, our motivations selfish." What makes this compelling is that it is an admission not of defeat but of a radically altered perspective of her role in relation to uncanniness, which, under the circumstances, seems the only sane admission to make.
VanderMeer pulls off the remarkable feat of presenting an immensely rich and immersive story in a narrative style that is elusive and ambiguous and a linguistic style that is reticent yet precise. This is a compelling combination.
  Bibliotheque_Refuses | Jun 13, 2024 |
“Area X” is a stretch of countryside (woods, marshes and coastline) where for the past thirty years something strange has been happening—supernatural perhaps, or something alien. It’s expanding too, its perimeter creeping outwards year on year.
    Like several other readers, this idea immediately reminded me of Arkady and Boris Strugatsky’s Roadside Picnic from the 1970s, and there the people who cross the Zone’s invisible but well-defined boundary are chancers, desperadoes going in illegally, alone or in pairs, looking to bring back out some of its strange (and valuable) alien artefacts, risking their lives and very sanity in the process. Here in Annihilation it’s teams of specialists, part of a covert government operation, and this novel documents the latest such expedition (supposedly the twelfth). Their task is to map, take samples and generally explore Area X—also to learn more about what may have happened to the previous expeditions. In other words, although all volunteers, they’re human guinea pigs too: a psychologist, a surveyor, an anthropologist and our narrator, a biologist.
    But have they been told the complete truth? Beyond the border things turn out to be “alien”, not in a Hollywood sense, but more in the way a dream is strange: the landscape itself doesn’t look particularly odd, yet nothing ever quite adds up or makes sense. Area X messes with your mind, and almost from the start this latest expedition begins to unravel.
    For me, this was one of those novels where I felt more might have been made of a good idea. Also, this is a rare example where I liked the film version more than the book (it’s usually the other way round). But then, this is only the first part of a trilogy, so I’m guessing the remaining two do take this a lot further (not sure I’ll be reading them to find out though). Much preferred Roadside Picnic. ( )
  justlurking | Jun 10, 2024 |
I really enjoyed this, as bizarre and unsettling as it is. The scientific expedition that sets out to explore a strange area with a barrier to entry and crazy phenomena inside. The hypnosis to make the team relax (or comply?), the way you can't trust what you see and everyone who has come before has never really returned, even if they physically did. I recall watching bits of the movie based off this, but I don't think I saw the whole thing. I certainly liked this book better than what I recall of the movie though. ( )
  KallieGrace | May 28, 2024 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 372 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Atemberaubend!
 
...strange, clever, off-putting, maddening, claustrophobic, occasionally beautiful, occasionally disturbing and altogether fantastic...Annihilation is a book meant for gulping — for going in head-first and not coming up for air until you hit the back cover.
afegit per zhejw | editaNPR, Jason Sheehan (Feb 7, 2014)
 
"Annihilation," in which the educated and analytical similarly meets up with the inhuman, is a clear triumph for Vandermeer, who after numerous works of genre fiction has suddenly transcended genre with a compelling, elegant and existential story of far broader appeal.
afegit per zhejw | editaLos Angeles Times, Lydia Millet (Jan 20, 2014)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (14 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Jeff VanderMeerautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Aula, NikoTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Blomeyer, MarionAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Corral, RodrigoDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Kellner, MichaelTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
McCormick, CarolynNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Nyquist, EricAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Strick, CharlotteDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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The tower, which was not supposed to be there, plunges into the earth in a place just before the black pine forest begins to give way to swamp and then the reeds and wind-gnarled trees of the marsh flats. Beyond the marsh flats and the natural canals lies the ocean and, a little farther down the coast, a derelict lighthouse. All of this part of the country had been abandoned for decades, for reasons that are not easy to relate. Our expedition was the first to enter Area X for more than two years, and much of our predecessors’ equipment had rusted, their tents and sheds little more than husks. Looking out over that untroubled landscape, I do not believe any of us could yet see the threat.
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Desolation tries to colonize you.
"Annihilation!" she shrieked at me, flailing in confusion.  "Annihilation! Annihilation!" The word seemed more meaningless the more she repeated it, like the cry of a bird with a broken wing.
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Wikipedia en anglès (1)

Area X has been cut off from the rest of the continent for decades. Nature has reclaimed the last vestiges of human civilization. The first expedition returned with reports of a pristine, Edenic landscape; all the members of the second expedition committed suicide; the third expedition died in a hail of gunfire as its members turned on one another; the members of the eleventh expedition returned as shadows of their former selves, and within months of their return, all had died of aggressive cancer. This is the twelfth expedition. Their group is made up of four women: an anthropologist, a surveyor, a psychologist--the de facto leader--and a biologist, who is our narrator. Their mission is to map the terrain and collect specimens, to record all their observations, scientific and otherwise, of their surroundings and of one another and, above all, to avoid being contaminated by Area X itself. They arrive expecting the unexpected, and Area X delivers--they discover a massive topographic anomaly and life forms that surpass understanding--but it's the surprises that came across the border with them and the secrets the expedition members are keeping from one another that change everything.

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Annihilation - page-turner or soporific? a Science Fiction Fans

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