IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

An Incurable Insanity

de Simi K. Rao

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses
1271,315,026 (3.44)No n'hi ha cap
Her heart fluttered when she heard the sound of the key turn in the lock. She quickly adjusted her maroon silk sari with the yellow border, the one that had caught his eye, and waited eagerly for his footsteps. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven... Yes, exactly seven steps before he stopped, hesitated for a few moments, then removed his shoes one by one and arranged them neatly side by side on the shoe rack. She smiled. He had been mindful of taking his shoes off every day now. 'I am not used to it, but I will if you want me to. It's probably a good thing to do anyway.' As he settled down, he would pick up the TV remote and, without looking at her, would say in his smooth baritone, 'So how did you spend your day, anything interesting?' Shaan Ahuja found himself bowing to tradition and agreeing to an arranged marriage to the beautiful Ruhi Sharma. He went through the motions but had no intention of carrying through on his vows. His last foray into matters of the heart with an American girl had left him scarred and unwilling to try again. Thoroughly disillusioned and disgruntled he wasted no time in making his intentions clear to Ruhi on their wedding night. But, he was completely unprepared for what his new wife had in mind.… (més)
No n'hi ha cap
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

Es mostren 1-5 de 7 (següent | mostra-les totes)
I knew I wanted to read Simi's book when I stumbled upon an excerpt and read the entire thing, losing track of time. I followed some links to another excerpt and lost myself in that one, too. Lol.

To read An Incurable Insanity is to be completely immersed in another world, a culture that originates in deep roots and clashes with the world I'm familiar with. It's fascinating.

The writing style is unique and smooth-flowing. Then the conversations POP! revealing a lot about the Indian culture beyond the story. It almost felt like there was a secret code with layers of polite communication in which words were a part - a very precise part - but were combined with actions and reactions resulting in... an exotic experience.

I soaked up the details Simi shared last fall. It was a deeper look into a beautiful culture that I had never understood to the same extent before. I've seen Saris worn, even seen the vermilion red dot, but I had no clue what they meant. With the tour and the story, Simi doesn't just share the details, it felt like she took me by the hand for a personal tour of her cultural roots.

I connected quickly with Ruhi. Her reaction to Shaan was totally justified, beginning to end, in my mind. Ha! She is strong and confident while still remaining true to her culture. Some of her expectations of herself surprised me, but I came with no presuppositions, already recognizing that I was in unfamiliar territory and LOVING it. I guess I really enjoy experiencing new cultures, but usually I don't get to learn of them as a proficient insider. :-) I loved that thoroughly.

Shaan grew on me slowly, the stinker. What is interesting is how immersed in the American culture he had become. Trying to combine the two cultures inside his home caused a big storm. His realization of things he had misunderstood and his shock of realizing what he had thrown away... these are so well expressed. I rarely dislike anyone so much... and then really like him sooo much. Very well done.

After I realized that the side characters all came from the same Indian culture, I just rolled with it. Lol. "It" was entertaining conversations that were wildly different than anything in my experience. The way everyone communicated with each other is remarkable and singular.

I began second-guessing my email communications with Simi, to be honest. Sometimes I am so blunt and skip over niceties... something every character in this story would never, ever, ever, ever do. My respect for anyone & everyone coming from the Indian culture grew like a magical beanstalk. In this story, it was as if their culture demanded they follow their rules of polite engagement even if everyone around them does not... and if I was in their story, I would never know how horribly I was insulting everyone. With every encounter!

To be completely... uh, blunt, this book did drive me insane. It is aptly named. Just when I thought Ruhi was coming around, Shaan would do something stupid. Again. When Shaan was finally responding the way he wanted to and was actually amazing, Ruhi remembers something and the moment is shattered. I could have strangled both of them before I reached the end of the book. Lol.

4.5 Stars. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in Indian culture!! It's a thousand times better than any text book on the subject and should be a required compainion. Lol. It's similar to being immersed in the culture. It's also a must-read for romance lovers and everyone looking for something unique. And exotic.

I really don't know how to say "Thank you very much" properly, Simi, but you're welcome at my house for tea any time. It was an honor to read your book. ( )
  BurgandyIce | Feb 8, 2014 |
I received this book through b00k r3vi3w tours in exchange for an honest review.

An Incurable Insanity is a lighthearted book about a difficult subject. Ruhi, excited for her marriage and willing to take a leap into the unknown for her new husband, is shocked when she finds out that he does not plan to keep his vows because he is already in love with another woman. In a desperate attempt, she gets him to agree to stay married for at least two months before setting her aside due to irreconcilable differences.

The beginning of the novel is a bit rushed; the events leading up to their wedding take only a few pages, and a lot of telling is done rather than showing. We are introduced by the narrator to the characters and given all of their backstory in one go. I also had a hard time understanding Ruhi - in the beginning we hear she is independent and headstrong, had her MBA, and that it was a shock to her friends that she chose to go through with an arranged marriage, yet she shows such unflinching devotion to a husband who doesn't want her, with very little regard for herself...it is hard to understand what compelled her to marry Shaan, let alone stay with him, and the reader is only given the unsatisfactory explanation that she saw his picture and knew he was the one.

Despite its flaws, this was a fun read. I love South Asian fiction so I knew I would most likely enjoy this book. The plot is rather formulaic - permutations of the arranged marriage where someone's already having an affair have been done to death - but you cannot help but to love the characters and simultaneously want to kick them for doing everything they can to keep themselves apart! ( )
  aishahwrites | Jan 16, 2014 |
See the full review on - http://sarityahalomi.blogspot.com/201...

The reading had a dream like quality - like I am watching one of those Indian moves with those pauses for songs. When I travel (6 months) there it was my favorite to go to the cinema and see how people were so into the movie...till the react to the different scenes. The plot just through me back to the colors, the tests and the smells.

The first time Ruhi saw Shaan’s picture – she just knew he was the one. So, among all the suitors that are vying for her attention, she allowed her father to arrange her marriage with a man she had never seen or talked to before. After all, their fathers have been friends and he was an eligible bachelor – handsome, smart, and has a stable job. While she was happily thinking of wedded bliss he was thinking of the woman he'd left behind in the US. Ruhi's dreams are shattered and while she''d like nothing more to leave Shaan behind she can't because she doesn't want to hurt her parents. Ruhi manages to get Shaan agree to give her some time before she has to break the news to her parents.

Ruhi is an independent, feisty, business school graduate who comes from a warm and loving family. Only problem. When it appears he couldn't care less about her being a dutiful Indian wife, she sheds her accoutrements, the mangasutra and sindoor, and goes off exploring metropolitan Los Angeles. You can't help but pull for Ruhi because she is so direct with her emotions. I felt like the bottom of my stomach had dropped out when Shaan's statement regarding his desires for their marriage. Shaan broke Ruhi’s heart on their wedding night when he confessed his love for another woman; I was glad to see that she did not welcome him into her hear with wide open arms like a wilted flower. My pity and pain turned to admiration when I saw how Ruhi handled the situation. While Shaan attempts to pretend Ruhi means nothing to his life, Ruhi quickly immerses herself into his house and attempts to break down his resistance – she’s not giving up her husband without a fight.

Shaan Ahuja was a graduate student when he first came to the United States. Now an aerospace engineer with no intentions of ever returning to India. Shaan had never thought that he’d followed tradition and agreed to an arranged marriage. But his father had blackmailed him into doing so. He had no choice but to do as he pleased, for his grandfather. At least until his father informs him his grandfather is dying and that his last wish is to see Shaan married. In no way, however, he would claim his marital rights or carry out his vows.Forced into an arranged marriage, Shaan is determined to make his intentions clear to his wife and plans to return her “untouched” to her family. Only he never planned on his wife being determined to save her pride and demand a two month time period where they could gently break it to their families they’re not a good fit. Agreeing to her plan, Shaan is unprepared for the realities of having a roommate who has no intentions of going home.

The novel is told from both Shaan and Ruhi's perspectives and there are sections marked out by italics where the dialogue is an internal one rather than between the two main characters. Generally the internal musings were in complete contradiction to whatever the character happened to actually be saying aloud. This let the reader know what the character was really thinking but was ultimately a very frustrating way of handling it.

I loved the secondary characters too. Let’s not forget Sunshine, Sooj and Debo ! I wished Des/Heather was just a bit more fleshed out. She came across as a bit too much of a caricature villains for me. Like, it mentioned that she was beat up in the beginning and then… there were no more mentions of it afterward. ( )
  yahalomi65 | Jan 15, 2014 |
An Incurable Insanity is an interesting look into a culture and way of life that many of us probably find to be very foreign and unfamiliar. Outside of anecdotal things I know from having friends and coworkers of Indian heritage, I don't know all that much about Indian culture, so I really liked the fact that the entire book was focused on that. Shaan is more Americanized, having gone to school in the US, but to Ruhi, everything about the US is new and different, and having to navigate being in a new country, being homesick, and being in a relationship which may or may not work has got to be a big deal for her.

Ruhi and Shaan are very complex people. They start out on total opposite sides: Shaan is agreeing to be married only because of obligation, but has no intention of ever really making a life with Ruhi. Ruhi, however, was attracted to Shaan as soon as she saw him, and was heartbroken to find out that he wasn't really interested in her. Over the course of the story, they swing back and forth with their feelings for one another and their intentions, and it takes a very long time for them to get on the same page.

I did enjoy how strong-willed Ruhi was, and how she managed to blend her headstrong personality with her culture and religion's values. While I felt that she came across as fairly naive at times, I liked how determined she was to get her way (even if I didn't always agree with how she did things or with what her end game was). At the start of the story, it's hard to like Shaan, since you know off the bat that his relationship with Ruhi is a sham. But over the course of the book, he becomes easier to like as he realizes the mistakes he's made and tries to fix things with Ruhi before it's too late.

When I was reading the book, I felt like I had to put my cultural expectations as a white, middle class American woman aside, and try to see things through Ruhi's eyes. The expectations around Ruhi's behavior and obligations are definitely not something that was in my culture or upbringing, so while there were times where I was like, Ruhi, girl, why are you putting up with this crap, I had to remind myself that her world is very different than mine. Once I did that, I was able to enjoy the story more -- otherwise, I just found myself getting angry about things because they didn't fit my worldview (like people expecting Ruhi to have Shaan's permission before going anywhere, for example).

The characters and situations are all very melodramatic and I really wanted people to just use their words with one another and to stop jumping to conclusions. Most of the problems in this book could have been solved if Ruhi and Shaan talked something out without getting angry or making assumptions. But then, we'd have no book, so it works. At times, I did feel that the writing was a bit stilted and could have been smoothed out in the editing process, but overall it was a quick, easy read. ( )
  goorgoahead | Dec 4, 2013 |
I think I would have enjoyed this book much more if it was about half as long and followed more of the traditional romance formula where the couple initially hate each other, then discover they actually love each other, then a conflict breaks them up, and then finally they get back together at the end and live happily ever after. In this book, Shaan and Ruhi are having a conflict and coming back together about every ten pages.It wore me out and got confusing at times. It was often hard for me to understand why Ruhi kept pushing Shaan away when he was telling her he cared for her and she also cared for him. They were already married after all, why not just give it a try?

I have a special place in my heart for India and Indian culture and I think that's what kept this book from being a two-star book for me. I appreciated the glossary in the back of the book, some of the Hindu and all of the Bengali words were new to me. This was M. Roa's first novel. She's a practicing physician so she's obviously an intelligent person. With a little more practice and better editing, I think she will grow to be a fine author. ( )
  mcelhra | Nov 3, 2013 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 7 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

Her heart fluttered when she heard the sound of the key turn in the lock. She quickly adjusted her maroon silk sari with the yellow border, the one that had caught his eye, and waited eagerly for his footsteps. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven... Yes, exactly seven steps before he stopped, hesitated for a few moments, then removed his shoes one by one and arranged them neatly side by side on the shoe rack. She smiled. He had been mindful of taking his shoes off every day now. 'I am not used to it, but I will if you want me to. It's probably a good thing to do anyway.' As he settled down, he would pick up the TV remote and, without looking at her, would say in his smooth baritone, 'So how did you spend your day, anything interesting?' Shaan Ahuja found himself bowing to tradition and agreeing to an arranged marriage to the beautiful Ruhi Sharma. He went through the motions but had no intention of carrying through on his vows. His last foray into matters of the heart with an American girl had left him scarred and unwilling to try again. Thoroughly disillusioned and disgruntled he wasted no time in making his intentions clear to Ruhi on their wedding night. But, he was completely unprepared for what his new wife had in mind.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Autor de LibraryThing

Simi K. Rao és un autor/a de LibraryThing, un autor/a que afegeix la seva biblioteca personal a LibraryThing.

pàgina del perfil | pàgina de l'autor

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.44)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 3
4.5
5 1

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 160,586,808 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible