IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Salinger (2013)

de David Shields, Shane Salerno

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
2951269,865 (3.45)15
The icon who disappeared. Raised in Park Avenue privilege, J. D. Salinger sought out combat, surviving five bloody battles of World War II and the liberation of a death camp, and out of that crucible he created a novel, The Catcher in the Rye, which journeyed deep into his own despair and redefined postwar America. For more than fifty years, Salinger has been one of the most elusive figures in American history. All of the attempts to uncover the truth about why he disappeared have been undermined by a lack of access and the recycling of inaccurate information. In the course of a nine-year investigation, and especially in the three years since Salinger's death, David Shields and Shane Salerno have interviewed more than 200 people on five continents (many of whom had previously refused to go on the record) to solve the mystery of what happened to Salinger.--From publisher description.… (més)
  1. 00
    J.D. Salinger: A Life de Kenneth Slawenski (GYKM)
    GYKM: I found this to be one of the better written, better researched, and less sensational biographies on Salinger.
  2. 00
    Tolkien: A Biography de Humphrey Carpenter (GYKM)
    GYKM: Although this is a rather popular biography, it was a far more measured and less sensational portrait about another writer who sought refuge from fame.
  3. 00
    Dance on the Earth: A Memoir de Margaret Laurence (GYKM)
    GYKM: A deeper and more engaging biography and exploration of a writer than "Salinger," by the writer herself.
  4. 00
    Persona: A Biography of Yukio Mishima de Naoki Inose (GYKM)
    GYKM: A less-sensational and less-critically panned biography about an even more complex postwar writer, one that actually referenced and analyzed the author's works.
  5. 00
    Untouchable: The Strange Life and Tragic Death of Michael Jackson de Randall Sullivan (akblanchard)
    akblanchard: "True fans" won't like the depictions of their heroes in these books, but they are both interesting reading for the less emotionally involved.
No n'hi ha cap
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 15 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 12 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Big problems here. The structure is oral history, but the speakers' relationships to Salinger aren't identified, though they are (re)arranged in chronological order of Salinger's life, so for example you can get an ex-lover (seemingly) in conversation with an unconnected war historian. There's a lot of 'in a letter to a friend, Salinger admitted Holden was based on his youth' -type stuff, but who is the friend & where is the letter? This stuff isn't sourced. Also the authors themselves break in to the oral narrative with these armchair psychology interludes that are often just tabloidy. They're nothing.

This book actually isn't very different than the previous bios, which it attacks in its opening pages. Shields & Salerno may (MAY) have more information than anyone else, but they haven't done anything useful or interesting with it. ( )
  Adammmmm | Sep 10, 2019 |
This was an ambitious project: interviews with over 200 people over nine years. The result is an interesting, although because of its oral history format, somewhat disjointed picture of the famously elusive author of Catcher in the Rye and many stories of the Glas family.

Salinger was undoubtedly a brilliant writer, publishing his first story in Story magazine when he was just 21 years old and getting a "first look" contract with The New Yorker before the age of 30. However, his very bad war during World War II (initial assault on D-Day, the battle of Hurtgen Forest, the Battle of the Bulge & stumbling into a Nazi death camp) left him with a severe case of PTSD before anyone knew what that was.. His penchant for very young girls - precipitated by his relationship with Oona O'Neill in the late 1930's and early 1940's - also added to his strange personality.

Was his retreat to Cornish, New Hampshire sincere, or just a ruse to get attention for himself? Is there a vault of stories waiting to be published? Maybe the fact that we're asking about question #2 answers question #1. ( )
  etxgardener | Oct 18, 2014 |
This book was a journey for me to read. Many other books got in the way that delayed me. Salinger is a great companion piece to the documentary that played in theatres earlier in the year. It dove into greater detail about J.D. Salinger and his very complicated life. I can understand the reviewers who did not like it. The information in Salinger has been around for years. The only new revelations was probably that J.D. Salinger did leave unpublished works in a safe that would only be released after his death. Salinger specifies that it would be between 2015 and 2020.

Many fans complained that, in both the book and documentary, that a lot of the information was regurgitated. They have heard it all before. However, I wasn't a die-hard fan of J.D. Salinger's even though I really enjoyed Catcher in the Rye. Honestly, when I heard he died back in 2010, I already thought he was dead for some time. My point is, that for a newcomer, Salinger succeeds. Salerno and Shields did a fine job using biographical, outsider interviews, and their own theories to describe the view of the author.

My view is that J.D. Salinger was a very complicated man who was suffering from a very potent case of PTSD. He didn't or couldn't acclimate to civilian life. He was sort of like a prisoner being released and having no aftercare program to help him transition. He found solace in two things: writing (he wrote the first 6 chapters of Catcher in the War) and in the Vedanta religion. J.D. Salinger was a very introverted dark man to begin with, and to be put in that kind of environment of war, caused him to retreat further into himself.

His attraction to very young girls was disturbing. I'm not sure if it was because that before the War, he had Oona O'Neill and everything was kind of hopeful for him. Every young girl ranging from Jean Miller to Joyce Maynard was a futile attempt to get back to it. His old treatment of them when they didn't meet his standards, I believe, was a way to get back at Oona for the treatment she showed him. She started ignoring his letters when she met Charlie Chaplin. Then Salinger found out from an Army comrade of his that she eventually married Chaplin. That was cold.

Unfortunately, many of J.D. Salinger's feelings are speculative. They were based on what others thought he would feel. I would have like to know how he really felt when people were using Catcher in the Rye as a coda for killing innocent people. Any work of art can be twisted to fit the needs of the beholder. It must have been disheartening to see something that worked so hard on and that saved his life being construed that way. ( )
1 vota Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
This book was a journey for me to read. Many other books got in the way that delayed me. Salinger is a great companion piece to the documentary that played in theatres earlier in the year. It dove into greater detail about J.D. Salinger and his very complicated life. I can understand the reviewers who did not like it. The information in Salinger has been around for years. The only new revelations was probably that J.D. Salinger did leave unpublished works in a safe that would only be released after his death. Salinger specifies that it would be between 2015 and 2020.

Many fans complained that, in both the book and documentary, that a lot of the information was regurgitated. They have heard it all before. However, I wasn't a die-hard fan of J.D. Salinger's even though I really enjoyed Catcher in the Rye. Honestly, when I heard he died back in 2010, I already thought he was dead for some time. My point is, that for a newcomer, Salinger succeeds. Salerno and Shields did a fine job using biographical, outsider interviews, and their own theories to describe the view of the author.

My view is that J.D. Salinger was a very complicated man who was suffering from a very potent case of PTSD. He didn't or couldn't acclimate to civilian life. He was sort of like a prisoner being released and having no aftercare program to help him transition. He found solace in two things: writing (he wrote the first 6 chapters of Catcher in the War) and in the Vedanta religion. J.D. Salinger was a very introverted dark man to begin with, and to be put in that kind of environment of war, caused him to retreat further into himself.

His attraction to very young girls was disturbing. I'm not sure if it was because that before the War, he had Oona O'Neill and everything was kind of hopeful for him. Every young girl ranging from Jean Miller to Joyce Maynard was a futile attempt to get back to it. His old treatment of them when they didn't meet his standards, I believe, was a way to get back at Oona for the treatment she showed him. She started ignoring his letters when she met Charlie Chaplin. Then Salinger found out from an Army comrade of his that she eventually married Chaplin. That was cold.

Unfortunately, many of J.D. Salinger's feelings are speculative. They were based on what others thought he would feel. I would have like to know how he really felt when people were using Catcher in the Rye as a coda for killing innocent people. Any work of art can be twisted to fit the needs of the beholder. It must have been disheartening to see something that worked so hard on and that saved his life being construed that way. ( )
  Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
[Salinger] by [[David Shields]] and [[Shane Salerno]]

This audiobook was chock full of information on the author's life. I found myself going back often to listen again to much of the information. The authors offered up the information in the form of commentary from many people who knew Salinger personally and also writers and others who benefited from the scholarship that has made up much of what is known of Salinger, who was a most private man. In addition to facts about him, there is included speculation about his legacy. The rumors that he spent the 45 years of his self-imposed seclusion writing has been pondered by many writers and scholars on the subject. According to Shields and Salerno, it is a documented fact that Salinger's writing will begin to be released in 2015 and will continue to be released irregularly until 2020, by his son Matthew and his wife at the time of his death Colleen Salinger, the executors of his literary estate. The writings will consist of mainly the continuation of his writings of the Caulfield family and the Glass family.

I found the re-telling of the years that Salinger spent during the war particularly poignant as he was involved in five bloody battles that he survived while many others did not, and that proved both his undoing and probably the basis of much of his writing. Not surprisingly, he experienced PTSD and much of his young life was effectively tainted by the suffering this caused him. His withdrawal from society, and his relationships with the women in his life were tainted by his need to control the circumstances he found himself in rather than adjusting to the situations. If those around him could not adjust themselves to his needs he retreated from any kind of interaction with them. He was a deeply troubled person, but was sought after and cared for by those who did manage to find a way into his cloistered life.

I found it deeply disturbing that [Catcher In the Rye] was connected to so many twisted personalities, such as Mark David Chapman, who shot John Lennon, the young man who shot Rebecca Schaeffer, and Jody Foster's stalker, who eventually attempted to shoot Ronald Regan. They were each discovered to have a copy of Catcher, as though it was their Bible, the handbook they somehow connected to their alienation from society, and the meaning behind the sordid actions they took. I think it was the appeal of the alienated youth, who could not find his niche in the world he found himself in, rather than any subliminal message the story held. Salinger could write perfectly about how it felt to hold one's self apart, to belong nowhere, and to resent the phoniness in others, while sensing that it may be your own inability to be true to yourself that makes you sensitive to the same thing in others. To a man already psychologically wounded by the ravages of war, this would have been a death blow. Given the painful publicity, the survivor's guilt would have been intensified for Salinger. This audiobook chronicles Salinger's life, speculates and validates what is known of his constant seeking for something to anchor him, which would turn out to be the Vedantic religion, which he studied and followed for much of his life. It delivers on all fronts, based as it is on the opinions and observations of so many different people who knew Salinger, or knew either the life of a writer or experienced the war years themselves. It was long, but worth the effort , and I feel I know a great deal about Salinger, the man and the writer, something I knew next to nothing about before listening to the audiobook. I highly recommend it. ( )
  mmignano11 | Mar 26, 2014 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 12 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

» Afegeix-hi altres autors

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
David Shieldsautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Salerno, Shaneautor principaltotes les edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
D-Day ( [1944])
Pel·lícules relacionades
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
I was with the Fourth Division during the war. I almost always write about very young people.
—J. D. Salinger
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
J. D. Salinger spent ten years writing The Catcher in the Rye and the rest of his life regretting it.
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
     "I was just going to actually pin this note up by your door," I said.
     "Well, come over here and give it to me."
     I got out of my car, walked over to his BMW, and gave him the note. He took a pair of reading glasses out of a case. He read the note. His face became long and drawn.
     That seemed to defuse his frustration from earlier. "Well, I understand," he said, "but I'm becoming embittered. I've gone through this scenario so many times in the last twenty-five years, I'm sick of it. Do you know how many times I've heard this story over and over again? People come from all over the place—from Canada, from Sacramento, from Europe. There was a woman from, I think, Switzerland who wanted to marry me. There was a guy in an elevator I had to run away from. There's nothing I can tell these people to help them with their problems."
     He stopped. "Nothing one man can say can help another. Each must make his own way. For all you know, I'm just a father who has a son. You saw my son go down the road. I'm not here to help people like you with your problems. I'm not a teacher or a seer. I'm not a counselor. I, perhaps, pose questions about life in my stories, but I don't pretend to know the answers. If you want to ask me a little bit about writing, I can say something. But I'm not a counselor. I'm a fiction writer."
Hillel Italie: "Salinger's place in Cornish (New Hampshire) history is mostly that he lived here. He was not the town sage, the town drunk, or even, reputation aside, the town eccentric. He was simply the tall, dark-eyed man who liked to watch the horses at the county fair, buy lettuce at the market or invite children inside for hot cocoa."
J. D. Salinger: "You never really get the smell of burning flesh out of your nose entirely. No matter how long you live."
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (1)

The icon who disappeared. Raised in Park Avenue privilege, J. D. Salinger sought out combat, surviving five bloody battles of World War II and the liberation of a death camp, and out of that crucible he created a novel, The Catcher in the Rye, which journeyed deep into his own despair and redefined postwar America. For more than fifty years, Salinger has been one of the most elusive figures in American history. All of the attempts to uncover the truth about why he disappeared have been undermined by a lack of access and the recycling of inaccurate information. In the course of a nine-year investigation, and especially in the three years since Salinger's death, David Shields and Shane Salerno have interviewed more than 200 people on five continents (many of whom had previously refused to go on the record) to solve the mystery of what happened to Salinger.--From publisher description.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.45)
0.5 1
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 16
3.5 2
4 10
4.5 2
5 4

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 163,388,546 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible