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Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands: A Novel de…
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Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands: A Novel (edició 2014)

de Chris Bohjalian (Autor)

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5856629,992 (3.71)33
"Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands is the story of Emily Shepard, a homeless teen living in an igloo made of ice and trash bags filled with frozen leaves. Half a year earlier, a nuclear plant in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom had experienced a cataclysmic meltdown, and both of Emily's parents were killed. Devastatingly, her father was in charge of the plant, and the meltdown may have been his fault. Was he drunk when it happened? Thousands of people are forced to flee their homes in the Kingdom; rivers and forests are destroyed; and Emily feels certain that as the daughter of the most hated man in America, she is in danger. So instead of following the social workers and her classmates after the meltdown, Emily takes off on her own for Burlington, where she survives by stealing, sleeping on the floor of a drug dealer's apartment, and inventing a new identity for herself -- an identity inspired by her favorite poet, Emily Dickinson. When Emily befriends a young homeless boy named Cameron, she protects him with a ferocity she didn't know she had. But she still can't outrun her past, can't escape her grief, can't hide forever--and so she comes up with the only plan that she can" --… (més)
Membre:Daniella.McCafferty
Títol:Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands: A Novel
Autors:Chris Bohjalian (Autor)
Informació:Random House Audio (2014), Edition: Unabridged
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:to-read

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Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands de Chris Bohjalian

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Chris Bohjalian does a great job of capturing a teenage girl's voice in this thought-provoking story. In fact, on the audio version, his own daughter is the narrator. Emily Shepherd is a troubled teen in the best of times, but when the meltdown comes -- literally -- the nuclear reactor in her idyllic Vermont town, where both her parents are employed experiences a Chernobyl-size disaster, Emily becomes even more messed up, and grown-up simultaneously. Forced to evacuate her hometown, bused out of school to towns outside the exclusion zone, and unsure of her parents' (and beloved dog's) fate, Emily strikes out on a journey of independence. Her father was the plant's main engineer, so he is blamed for the whole thing and that keeps Emily from coming forward to try to be found or connected with anyone who can help her. She has no other viable family (elderly grandparents in nursing homes)and feels too ashamed to seek out friends. Instead she decides to survive on the streets by herself, predictably in the few ways teenage girls can. After a few months, she befriends a young boy, Cameron, and that alters her survival mode to be more maternal and wary, but when he becomes deathly ill, her whole house of cards tumbles down. The title refers to the advice given to children evacuated from the Sandy Hook school shooting as they navigated the carnage. It is equally applicable to Emily and her journey of self-discovery and survival. ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
Warning: A rant is coming on. Proceed at your own risk. :)

This, in my opinion, is not Chris Bohjalian's best book. Far from it. As hard as it was, I stuck with it because I wanted to comment on a growing absurdity among authors I once admired. It is not only authors. Seasoned, respected professional interviewers, excellent podcasters, and interviewees are doing it, too. I can no longer listen to Terry Gross, NPR host of Fresh Air. She should know better! I often have to delete podcasts because the person being interviewed consistently uses 'like' incorrectly. It's like fingernails on a chalkboard or having to listen to a speaker at a podium say "um" over and over or people who use the expression "you know" over and over and I want to say, "No, I don't know" over and over. There is no reason for a writer to use this word incorrectly, as a filler, or even to bring forth a characters' personality. Here's an example from the book:

Dialog:
"But he's, like, nine."
"He's not 'like' nine. He is nine."

I think the author finally got sick of writing his characters' speech and had to throw that comment in on p.216. After that the incorrect use of 'like' tapers off considerably. Thank heavens!

Here is my argument to authors: The incorrect use of the word 'like' does not tell me anything about the character. It does not denote educational level, economic status, IQ, upbringing, age, or social status. So many people today use the word incorrectly as a filler. It does not sound cool or hip, just dumb.

The other reason I stuck with this book is because I lived in Burlington, VT seven years and loved it. He gets every street, every coffee shop, every Burlington artifact exactly right. I was transported back to the Northeast Kingdom, where I owned a cabin, and to the streets of Burlington, my favorite city on earth.

This story is very sad, very gritty. I think it is a good story. The f-word is certainly over-used. Excellent writers [Karl Marlantes' Matterhorn comes to mind] don't have to over-work the foul language. Matterhorn is about our marines in Vietnam. We know marines cuss a lot. Marlantes uses the language only when necessary and obvious. Having a street person consistantly use foul language because that's what street people do (maybe?) seems to me like a cop-out, a way to avoid the work of good writing. Police are known to swear a lot too. Watch the Canadian cop show, Flash Point, and over several seasons you will never hear them swear. It's an absolutely great show, with excellent writing! End of rant. ( )
1 vota lasvegasbookie | Aug 20, 2020 |
Emily Shepard, a homeless teen living in an igloo made of ice and trash bags filled with frozen leaves. Half a year earlier, a nuclear plant in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom had experienced a cataclysmic meltdown, and both of Emily's parents were killed. Devastatingly, her father was in charge of the plant, and the meltdown may have been his fault. Was he drunk when it happened? Thousands of people are forced to flee their homes in the Kingdom; rivers and forests are destroyed; and Emily feels certain that as the daughter of the most hated man in America, she is in danger. So instead of following the social workers and her classmates after the meltdown, Emily takes off on her own for Burlington, where she survives by stealing, sleeping on the floor of a drug dealer's apartment, and inventing a new identity for herself -- an identity inspired by her favorite poet, Emily Dickinson. When Emily befriends a young homeless boy named Cameron, she protects him with a ferocity she didn't know she had. But she still can't outrun her past, can't escape her grief, can't hide forever—and so she comes up with the only plan that she can.
  Gmomaj | Oct 7, 2019 |
Emily is a fairly normal teen living with her parents and their dog in northeast Vermont. Both of her parents work at the nearby nuclear plant. One day while Emily is at school, the nuclear plant suffers a meltdown, the school and all surrounding areas are evacuated, and suddenly Emily is homeless and without a family, her parents assumed killed in the disaster. As rumors start to emerge about her father being at fault for the meltdown, Emily bolts and finds herself living on the streets, afraid to reveal her true identity.

I've enjoyed, for the most part, all of Bohjalian's novels that I've read so far. He's a talented writer and he explores a variety of topics that are interesting and somewhat unique. I mostly enjoyed this, although it was not my favorite of his. It was, as he himself states in the interview at the end of the book, a tragically sad story. And that was what I was feeling throughout the majority of this book -- utter sadness. While I'm certainly not a reader who gravitates toward more happy, sappy books and I feel like all good stories need some sort of discord to make the story real, this one was almost too sad and depressing, even for me. I also wasn't really able to relate to or like Emily's character, and that may have influenced my feelings as well. I read this on audio, which was narrated by Bohjalian's daughter Grace, and while this may have added a nice touch and she certainly read capably enough, I found her voice too flat without much change in inflection. Overall, an interesting book, but it hovered somewhere between good and so-so for me. ( )
  indygo88 | Aug 17, 2019 |
Great story of a teen girl’s life after running away from home. Her drunken father was responsible for a nuclear plant meltdown in which her parents were killed, property destroyed, and many were exposed to radiation. She spent her life on the streets, in shelters, and homeless. The story is read by the author’s daughter who does an excellent job. ( )
  LivelyLady | Jan 24, 2019 |
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"Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands is the story of Emily Shepard, a homeless teen living in an igloo made of ice and trash bags filled with frozen leaves. Half a year earlier, a nuclear plant in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom had experienced a cataclysmic meltdown, and both of Emily's parents were killed. Devastatingly, her father was in charge of the plant, and the meltdown may have been his fault. Was he drunk when it happened? Thousands of people are forced to flee their homes in the Kingdom; rivers and forests are destroyed; and Emily feels certain that as the daughter of the most hated man in America, she is in danger. So instead of following the social workers and her classmates after the meltdown, Emily takes off on her own for Burlington, where she survives by stealing, sleeping on the floor of a drug dealer's apartment, and inventing a new identity for herself -- an identity inspired by her favorite poet, Emily Dickinson. When Emily befriends a young homeless boy named Cameron, she protects him with a ferocity she didn't know she had. But she still can't outrun her past, can't escape her grief, can't hide forever--and so she comes up with the only plan that she can" --

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