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Begge dele de Ali Smith
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Begge dele (2014 original; edició 2015)

de Ali Smith

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses / Mencions
1,2714111,477 (3.77)1 / 246
"SHORT-LISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE Passionate, compassionate, vitally inventive and scrupulously playful, Ali Smith's novels are like nothing else. How to be both is a novel all about art's versatility. Borrowing from painting's fresco technique to make an original literary double-take, it's a fast-moving genre-bending conversation between forms, times, truths and fictions. There's a renaissance artist of the 1460s. There's the child of a child of the 1960s. Two tales of love and injustice twist into a singular yarn where time gets timeless, structural gets playful, knowing gets mysterious, fictional gets real--and all life's givens get given a second chance"--"The brilliant Booker-nominated novel from one of our finest authors: How to Be Both is a daring, inventive tale that intertwines the stories of a defiant Renaissance painter and a modern teenage girl. How can one be both--near and far, past and present, male and female? In Ali Smith's new novel, two extraordinary characters inhabit the spaces between categories. In one half of the book, we follow the story of Francescho del Cossa, a Renaissance painter in fifteenth-century Italy who assumes a duel identity, living as both a man and a woman. In the novel's other half, George, a contemporary English teenage girl, is in mourning after the death of her brilliant, rebellious mother. As she struggles to fill the void in her life, George finds her thoughts circling again and again around a whimsical trip she and her mother once made to Italy, to see a certain Renaissance fresco... These two stories call out to each other in surprising and deeply resonant ways to form a veritable literary double-take, bending the conventions of genre, storytelling, and our own preconceptions"--… (més)
Membre:Alendor
Títol:Begge dele
Autors:Ali Smith
Informació:[Kbh.] : Gyldendals Bogklubber, 2015.
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca, Per llegir
Valoració:
Etiquetes:britisk litteratur, ukonventionel

Detalls de l'obra

How to Be Both de Ali Smith (2014)

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Es mostren 1-5 de 41 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Jez Burrows rec
  wordloversf | Aug 14, 2021 |
I’m getting to the point where Ali Smith novels go one of two ways with me. Either they simply don’t click, nothing connects, and I find myself starting to skim her prose—which makes me feel simply evil. This feeling of being left out in the cold and just not getting the fine prose she’s putting out there, takes me right to my master theory of reading, it’s all about “the right book at only the right time.” As I’ve just turned into a 67-year-old widower, I’m sure that I will never have enough time to reread and enjoy all the books that I didn’t get on the first go-round … just another subdivision of “so many books, so little time.”

The other way I experience Smith’s books, is that they’re pure gold. At those times, I feel like she’s actually been in my head, reading my thoughts, and then she’s able to write in the same wonderfully bizarre way that I think and experience this world. In all my decades of reading, feeling like an author’s prose is that personal, that it’s clicking right along with my thoughts and reflecting my mind, has happened very, very few times.

The book tells two stories of love and injustice, by telling of Franchescho, an Italian fresco painter from the 1460s, as well as George, a troubled child of a child of the 1960s. Smith loves to play with the form of her prose as she winds time and characters all around with her delicious writing. Time also becomes more fluid and less defined in her writing. As she writes, “Writing can be like falling in love, too“ [When] it starts to happen, and it’s kind of invigorating. It means that time disappears, it’s the same as when you’re reading something that takes you out of time. It’s also very like love, actually. It’s one of those things where time disappears and you look at the clock and you’re like, what happened to the rest of that day?” And then Smith brings in another artist with this, “’I paint flowers so they will not die,’ Frida Kahlo once said, speaking for many an artist driven to wrestle with mortality yet also escape the time-bound realm.” And while we’re on perception, I love the beautiful simplicity of the following. “Can we never get to go beyond ourselves?’ her mother says. “Never get to be more than ourselves? Will I ever, as far as you’re concerned, be allowed to be anything other than your mother?”

This novel won the 2015 Women’s Prize for Fiction and was a Man Booker Prize finalist, and much loved by her fans and reviewers. Besides toying with time, Smith writes with such beauty about gender fluidity in both stories—far beyond the teenage girl named George who is exploring her sexuality, and Franchescho, who was born a girl, but binds her chest and lives as a man.

I didn’t discover another thing about the book until I caught it in a review. The book was issued in what her publishers called a "literary double-take," with two editions—sharing the same cover—but the order of the two stories is flipped. In one edition, it begins with that contemporary story about George, a highly intelligent English teenager, caught up in the recent death of his intelligent, feminist mother. That’s followed by a time-bending story of a troubled Italian Renaissance painter. Read the other edition and the stories are reversed. This all takes me back to the first LP I played that had two recordings on the same side, what you heard simply depended on which groove your needle dropped into.

No matter how I feel about a particular Ali Smith novel at the moment, I always love the beauty of her writing, as this passage shows. “George looks at her mother. Her mother looks at George. A yellow-white flower drops, brushes past her mother’s nose, catches in her hair and comes to rest on her collarbone. Her mother laughs. George feels the urge to laugh too, though she is still wearing her guilt – fury scowl. Half her mouth turns up. The other half holds its downward shape.”

When her books connect, they are so magically golden that any number of mis-readings—where my mind wasn’t in the right place—are fine by me. But possibly, instead of another novel right now, I’ll wait for that promising short story collection that I have on order to come, and take that for a ride. ( )
  jphamilton | Jul 15, 2021 |
Rating: 2.5* of five

Just not what I would describe as a successful experiment; more a failed gimmick. "George"'s androgyny and Francesco's response to it probably sounded good in 2010 or so, as the book was being planned, but it comes across as queer-baiting in 2020. Also, connections reaching through time is a trope well-established (which, to be fair, wasn't anywhere near as much the case in 2014) and thus in need of something *not* negative to distinguish it from the mass of others like it. ( )
  richardderus | Mar 10, 2021 |
Masterfully written, this book is pure fluidity of time, place, gender (i.e. how to be "both"). "...beauty in its most completeness is never found in a single body but is something shared instead between more than one body." (90) If you liked Life After Life, you will enjoy the non-linear nature of this story, but it takes some work. The first half, Eyes - Camera, is told in flashback and re-incarnation (?) by the painter Franceso(a) della Cosso during the Renaissance of both the time period in Italy and his/her fresco work but also observations and musings about a young girl in contemporary time that (s)he is observing as a spirit or re-incarnation in the form of a seed/leaf.(?) Obviously this part is a little unclear, and is meant to be -- the narrator is sifting through 500 years of memory and also trying to make sense of modern-day conventions and inventions. The second half, Camera - Eyes is what makes the book so enjoyable. George (ia) is a teen girl in Cambridge who has lost her mother to a sudden death in the previous year. She is trying to make sense of the loss and her life in addition to looking after a younger brother, Henry and her failing father. Part of her grief therapy is photography and she creates a wall of images of her mother (a sort of modern-day fresco) with the help of a friend. Her mother was a well-known activist and created many famous "subverts" that went viral in cyberspace -- George has her intelligence and artistic temperament. On a trip before her death, her mother took George and Henry to see the frescoes of della Cosso after reading about their subversive undertones ((s)he thought (s)he was underpaid for the work and put many hidden meanings in the paintings.) That is what joins the 2 narratives, in addition to some clever word play, parallelism and similarities. For example George observes the Italian countryside: "Things change in a moment here, light to dark, dark to light, and although it is so stony it is somehow also bright green and red and yellow too. " Regarding the frescoes (although it pertains to the photographs too), Francesco (a) notes "the thing that happens when the the life of the picture itself steps beyond the frame....it does 2 opposing things at once: the one is it lets the world be seen and understood. The other is, it unchains the eyes and the lives of those who see it and gives them a moment of freedom, from its world and from their world both." And one concept from the past portion of the book comes from the narrator's mother (also dead prematurely): "We need both luck and justice to get to live the life we're meant for..." (131) She illustrates the lesson with the example of seeds and where they fall and if they grow. All these dualities and threads of themes are carefully pieced together into a cohesive whole that examines the nature of art, love, and time. ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
delightful and different
  audsreads | Jul 19, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 41 (següent | mostra-les totes)
...there is no doubt that Smith is dazzling in her daring. The sheer inventive power of her new novel pulls you through, gasping, to the final page.
afegit per charl08 | editaThe Guardian, Elizabeth Day (Jul 9, 2014)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (10 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Ali Smithautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Banks, JohnNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Juul, PiaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
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Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
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Esdeveniments importants
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Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
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Epígraf
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Et ricordare suplicando a quella che io sonto francescho del cossa il quale a sollo fatto quili tri canpi verso lanticamara :
Francesco del Cossa
green spirit seeking life
where only drought and desolation sting;
spark that says that everything begins
where everything seems charcoal

— Eugenio Montale 'The eel'/ (trans. Jonathan Galassi)
J’ai rêvé Que sur un grand mur blanc je lisais mon testament

Sylvie Vartan
...although the living is subject to the ruin of the time, the process of decay is at the same time a process of crystallization, that in the depth of the sea, into which sinks and is dissolved what once was alive, some things “suffer a sea-change” and survive in new crystallized forms and shapes that remain immune to the elements, as though they waited only for the pearl diver who one day will come down to them and bring them up into the world of the living...

Hannah Arendt, 'Introduction to Walter Benjamin, Illuminations: Essays and Reflections'
Just like a character in a novel, he disappeared suddenly, without leaving the slightest trace behind.

Giorgio Bassani /Jamie McKendrick
Dedicatòria
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For Frances Arthur
and everyone who made her,

to keep in mind
Sheila Hamilton,
walking work of art,

and for Sarah Wood
artist.
Primeres paraules
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Consider this moral conundrum for a moment, George's mother says to George who is sitting in the front passenger seat.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
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(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
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CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (2)

"SHORT-LISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE Passionate, compassionate, vitally inventive and scrupulously playful, Ali Smith's novels are like nothing else. How to be both is a novel all about art's versatility. Borrowing from painting's fresco technique to make an original literary double-take, it's a fast-moving genre-bending conversation between forms, times, truths and fictions. There's a renaissance artist of the 1460s. There's the child of a child of the 1960s. Two tales of love and injustice twist into a singular yarn where time gets timeless, structural gets playful, knowing gets mysterious, fictional gets real--and all life's givens get given a second chance"--"The brilliant Booker-nominated novel from one of our finest authors: How to Be Both is a daring, inventive tale that intertwines the stories of a defiant Renaissance painter and a modern teenage girl. How can one be both--near and far, past and present, male and female? In Ali Smith's new novel, two extraordinary characters inhabit the spaces between categories. In one half of the book, we follow the story of Francescho del Cossa, a Renaissance painter in fifteenth-century Italy who assumes a duel identity, living as both a man and a woman. In the novel's other half, George, a contemporary English teenage girl, is in mourning after the death of her brilliant, rebellious mother. As she struggles to fill the void in her life, George finds her thoughts circling again and again around a whimsical trip she and her mother once made to Italy, to see a certain Renaissance fresco... These two stories call out to each other in surprising and deeply resonant ways to form a veritable literary double-take, bending the conventions of genre, storytelling, and our own preconceptions"--

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Mitjana: (3.77)
0.5
1 6
1.5
2 17
2.5 6
3 54
3.5 22
4 105
4.5 29
5 47

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