IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

The Peripheral de William Gibson
S'està carregant…

The Peripheral (edició 2014)

de William Gibson (Autor)

Sèrie: Stub (1)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,570788,299 (3.88)74
Where Flynne and her brother, Burton, live, jobs outside the drug business are rare. Fortunately, Burton has his veteran's benefits, for neural damage he suffered from implants during his time in the USMC's elite Haptic Recon force. Then one night Burton has to go out, but there's a job he's supposed to do-a job Flynne didn't know he had. Beta-testing part of a new game, he tells her. The job seems to be simple: work a perimeter around the image of a tower building. Little buglike things turn up. He's supposed to get in their way, edge them back. That's all there is to it. He's offering Flynne a good price to take over for him. What she sees, though, isn't what Burton told her to expect. It might be a game, but it might also be murder.… (més)
Membre:dlduncan
Títol:The Peripheral
Autors:William Gibson (Autor)
Informació:Berkley (2014), Edition: 1ST, 496 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

The Peripheral de William Gibson

  1. 00
    Agency de William Gibson (jeroenvandorp)
  2. 01
    Walkaway: A Novel de Cory Doctorow (melmore)
    melmore: Both works extrapolate from our current situation to imagine not-dissimilar futures. Both are concerned with questions of wealth distribution, resource depletion, human agency, equality, freedom. Both have super bad-ass female protagonists (who are nonetheless recognizable human beings).… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 74 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 75 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Really should be 4.5 stars, because it feels like this is a sliver away from being on par with Neuromancer or Pattern Recognition, but man, is this good. Go in as blind as possible. Take the book jacket off so you don't read it. What I really wanted here was the connective tissue between Pattern Recognition and Neuromancer, really -- that little gap of space between Here and There seems like the kind of place where Gibson could have a field day, and he does here. A book I'll probably reread in three years and give five stars. ( )
  skolastic | Feb 2, 2021 |

There's so little that can be said about this book without spoiling some of the journey, but I can say this: like all of the best science fiction, the futuristic devices exist not for their own sake but as vehicles for us to ask questions about ourselves, the society we're building, and the world around us. It's chock full of characters who are interesting and likable to varying degrees, but who also feel very real and flawed and human. Flynne is a joy of a protagonist, tough and smart but also very aware of the limits of her agency. Wilf is harder to like, but he's on a journey whether he likes it or not, and it's very fun to be along for the ride. I appreciate a light touch with the viewpoint switching, enough to give us a story but not so much as to become exhaustive and exhausting. There was one tiny thing about the narrative that bugged me, but it's hardly enough to detract from a great story, great world, and great writing. ( )
  iangreenleaf | Jan 26, 2021 |
It has its flaws and the wrap-up at the end felt a little weak, but the ride was just too entertaining to give it anything but five stars. ( )
  SpookyFM | Jan 18, 2021 |
My first Gibson book and I have to say that I really enjoyed this one. I do not have much to complain about at all actually. So I just leave this here as a recommendation. Nice pacing, no overuse of some futuristic english, etc. All just very nice. ( )
  gullevek | Dec 15, 2020 |
I remember reading an interview with Gibson once, decades ago, in which he said that he finds it awkward the way people ascribe great technical knowledge to him because he knows very little about computers and other technical matters. He admitted to knowing next to nothing about his own computer at one point, and focused his novels around the snippets of things he did know about science and technology only as a way to create window dressing for his speculations about the human condition in a technologically advanced future.

This, of course, is his particular genius as a writer of speculative fiction. He extracts intriguing insights from the way people change as their worlds change, projecting that forward into a future imagined around the direction of sociopolitical and techno-economic (to coin a chintzy buzzword) evolution. His Blue Ant novels dug deep into the present, which I believe served in some respects as a way to recalibrate his sense of the future because of how fast things are changing now, and how easy it is for science fiction (and other speculative fiction) writers to make the mistake of predicting things that look laughably out of place by the time a manuscript hits the presses.

During that recalibration, he seems to have learned some things about accelerating sociopolitical change as much as about accelerating technological adancement. People have commented on the happy endings in the Blue Ant series, but I always detected a hint of concern about the bigger picture and the ominous dangling questions about the greater implications of some things that were not central to the plots of those novels. Perhaps my keen interest in everything Gibsonian allowed me some recalibration as well during that period of Gibson's writing that gave me some insight into the real meaning of how things ended in The Peripheral, because I find myself going through several phases of (mis)understanding of what happened before arriving at a very different conclusion about how this novel ended than many other reviewers.

Let's start somewhere around the beginning before I get to the end:

Take a healthy helping of cynical world view, and apply it as a filter to the (already somewhat bleak, and less-well directed) world of Doctorow's Makers, plus a less dramatically over-the-top variation on the authoritarian hellscape of Doctorow's After the Siege (from his Overclocked anthology). Sprinkle some Breaking Bad, and some . . . no, never mind. I'll never finish describing it this way. Suffice to say he combines all the not-going-away-soon desperation and despair mounting in the present world with the coming-quickly rapidly accelerating cheap plastic (and not shiny at all) technological advancement going on all around us, mediated and propagated by moneyed interests whose only motivations are profit margins and international sociopolitical influence. Upon combination, what we end up with is a future within (most of) our expected lifetimes that is at once both weirdly out of joint with most people's expectations and eerily familiar (and somehow quite inevitable-seeming).

Throw some characters into this who read like emotionally damaged hybrids of the characters in his preceding three trilogies, then connect them by efficient data networking to a future farther ahead of their world than theirs is from ours. In that farther future -- well, imagine how the Tessier-Ashpools and their contemporaries might have developed in a world where the technological singularity mostly just killed people with grinding gradualness, but only people without sufficient resources to protect themselves, which means almost all people, and where that technological singularity spat out a future hindered by the perverse incentives of centralized bureaucratic power so that "post-humans" are still depressingly limited humanity and decadence breeds stagnation.

People die. The good guys are either somewhat hapless and broken (but strong-willed) bystanders swept into a maelstrom beyond their understanding or the chillingly pseudohuman apparatus of various thoroughly inhuman entities, but all of them painted in prose that sweeps the reader into irresistible sympathy with their respective plights. People who recognize the horrific, unacceptable atrocity that would be committed by a particularly vile form of chemical weapon attack later end up casually disintegrating people directly in front of them by simplistically directed nanotech swarms that rapidly "disassemble" their targets, and no guilt or horror seems to follow from this.

Reviews comment on the denouement of The Peripheral as a "happy ending", and sure, there's some "we have lovely romantic pairings and the good guys win" in there, but given their presence in the midst of the dark context of the climax mere pages before that I can't help but note a couple of things that set that whole notion of a happy ending on its head:

1. The lesson of the "jackpot" -- the world-destroying conditions that accompanied the lopsided, pathologically progressing singularity envisioned in this novel -- was recognized by some of the characters: shortsighted authoritarian economic and sociopolitical management is really what destroyed the world. Unfortunately, recognizing it doesn't stop the protagonists and their confederates from setting forth to make the same mistakes, in principle, with only superficial alterations in how things get handled. One might weep for the world they will create, at least initially for the best of intentions.

2. People blithely entered into this "happy ending" without the kind of agonized reflection on how they got there one might hope they should face. Winning, and with spectacular immediate wealth, seems to have a tendency to strip away the humanity that made them the good guys in the first place. In the end, the same weapons used to beat the "bad guys" were the weapons the "good guys" found so horrifically unconscionable when used by the "bad guys" in the beginning. Far from fixing the world, they've become the very people they fought.

I don't know if Gibson intended everything I saw here, but my experience of his writing suggests he probably intended at least 98% of it, and perhaps a lot more that I have not yet recognized.

It's a grim ending, dressed in party clothes, with an impressive level of sophistication and depth of meaning heaped on top of a vividly imagined and artfully described pair of futures that manage to conjure the strangeness of immediately pre-singularity and more distantly post-singularity worlds while still keeping them subject to narrative presentation. For all that and quite a bit more, I find myself unable to give The Peripheral fewer than five out of five stars. ( )
1 vota apotheon | Dec 14, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 75 (següent | mostra-les totes)
"The Gibson of The Peripheral is interested in ideas but he’s also very much interested in big-screen, popcorn-chewing thrills. Unlike more po-faced SF writers, he takes glee in kick-assery of an adolescent sort."
afegit per bookfitz | editaThe Guardian, Sam Leith (Nov 19, 2014)
 
"The Peripheral" is engaged with serious ideas — the moral pressure of life in late capitalist society, the state of identity in a world of mingled gamer-selves, online-selves, physical-selves — and through them it achieves the strange effect of making our own accelerated days feel quaint, at least partially analog for a bit longer, "oddly optimistic," still yet to endure anything truly apocalyptic.
afegit per bookfitz | editaChicago Tribune, Charles Finch (Oct 24, 2014)
 
"What sets each book apart is the worldbuilding that surrounds that plot kernel. This time around, it’s particularly intriguing."
afegit per bookfitz | editaKirkus Reviews (Oct 15, 2014)
 
"All of Gibson’s characters are intensely real, and Flynne is a clever, compelling, stereotype-defying, unhesitating protagonist who makes this novel a standout."
afegit per bookfitz | editaPublishers Weekly (Sep 1, 2014)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (2 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
William Gibsonautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Achilles, GretchenDissenyadorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Gray318Dissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hasselberger, RichardDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

Pertany a aquestes sèries

Stub (1)
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
I have already told you of the sickness and confusion that comes with time travelling.

--H. G. Wells
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
To Shannie
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
They didn't think Flynne's brother had PTSD, but that sometimes the haptics glitched him.
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
“Why aren’t you up in the future,” Flynne asked him, “flying your washing machine?”
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (1)

Where Flynne and her brother, Burton, live, jobs outside the drug business are rare. Fortunately, Burton has his veteran's benefits, for neural damage he suffered from implants during his time in the USMC's elite Haptic Recon force. Then one night Burton has to go out, but there's a job he's supposed to do-a job Flynne didn't know he had. Beta-testing part of a new game, he tells her. The job seems to be simple: work a perimeter around the image of a tower building. Little buglike things turn up. He's supposed to get in their way, edge them back. That's all there is to it. He's offering Flynne a good price to take over for him. What she sees, though, isn't what Burton told her to expect. It might be a game, but it might also be murder.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.88)
0.5
1 10
1.5
2 23
2.5 3
3 76
3.5 30
4 158
4.5 19
5 110

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 156,973,633 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible