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The Terror (2007)

de Dan Simmons

Altres autors: Mira la secció altres autors.

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
4,2481992,386 (3.97)369
Their captain's insane vision of a Northwest Passage has kept the crewmen of HMS Terror trapped in Arctic ice for two years without a thaw. But the real threat to their survival isn't the ever-shifting landscape of white, the provisions that have turned to poison, or the ship slowly buckling in the grip of the frozen ocean. The real threat is whatever is out in the frigid darkness, stalking their ship, snatching and brutally killing their fellow seamen. Captain Crozier, who has taken over the expedition after the death of its original leader, Sir John Franklin, draws equally on his strengths as a mariner and on the mystical beliefs of the Eskimo woman he's rescued as he sets a course on foot out of the Arctic and away from the insatiable beast. But every day the dwindling crew becomes more deranged and mutinous, until even Crozier begins to fear there may be no escape from an ever-more-inconceivable nightmare.… (més)
  1. 40
    On the Proper Use of Stars de Dominique Fortier (jseger9000)
    jseger9000: Both are fictionalized retellings of the Franklin Expedition. The Terror contains supernatural elements whereas On the Proper Use of Stars aims to be more of a nonfiction novel.
  2. 40
    Frozen in Time: The Fate of the Franklin Expedition de Owen Beattie (VivienneR)
  3. 41
    Dark Matter de Michelle Paver (Jannes)
    Jannes: More Arctic horror. Simmons might is a bit more viceral, but the heart of the horror - the cold, darkness and isolation of the arctic north - is the same in both novels.
  4. 30
    The Arctic Grail: The Quest for the Northwest Passage and The North Pole, 1818-1909 de Pierre Berton (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: Compelling non-fiction work detailing historical facts around the quest for the Northwest Passage, including the Franklin expedition. Listed among Dan Simmons' sources at the back of his novel.
  5. 20
    La pell freda de Albert Sánchez Piñol (caimanjosh)
    caimanjosh: The Terror is rather less literary-aspiring and far longer, but the same elements of horror in the desolate Arctic/Antarctic, combined with some meditation on the nature of man, is present.
  6. 21
    The Martian de Andy Weir (TomWaitsTables)
  7. 10
    Tales of Unease de Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (saltmanz)
    saltmanz: Doyle's short story "The Captain of the Polestar" also features an artic expedition with elements of the supernatural.
  8. 10
    Breu història dels que ja no hi són de Kevin Brockmeier (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For death and the cold and the nameless, stalking monster.
  9. 00
    Barrow's Boys de Fergus Fleming (Kristelh)
    Kristelh: Includes chapters on Arctic exploration specific to Erebus, The Terror, and "the man who ate his boots"
  10. 00
    Last Call de Tim Powers (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For an alternate interpretation of historic events.
  11. 12
    The Queen of Bedlam de Robert R. McCammon (Scottneumann)
  12. 12
    Mister Slaughter de Robert R. McCammon (Scottneumann)
  13. 13
    Speaks the Nightbird de Robert R. McCammon (Scottneumann)
  14. 02
    Drop City de T. C. Boyle (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For characters failing to adapt to their environment.
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» Mira també 369 mencions

Anglès (189)  Francès (3)  Alemany (3)  Italià (2)  Castellà (1)  Totes les llengües (198)
Es mostren 1-5 de 198 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Great tension & build up through the first 3 quarters of the story, but took a turn for the weird in the final stretch ( )
  Pilgriminal | Nov 12, 2022 |
I enjoyed having the map included in the beginning of the book, of the area that the terror and the Erebus traveled in and were abandoned in the different camps that the men made.
I would have appreciated a glossary of ship and crew terms, because I only had a vague idea of, for example, different names of ship parts, and all the different crew members referred to over and over in this book. For example, what is a caulker's mate?
This was an extremely well researched book. While it is fiction, it refers to real people and real voyages taken. Simmons merely fleshed out the story, imagining what happened to these men, how their daily life was.

Where the two ships are stranded in the ice pack, a creature is hunting them. Two of the ships crew have gone missing. But they turned up again.
Paperback 2018 First Bay Back
P.128:
"When the door is shut, Irving says, 'it's William strong and Tommy evans, sir. They're back.'
crozier blinks. 'what the devil do you mean, back? Alive?' he feels the first surge of hope he's had for months.
'oh, no sir,' says irving. 'just... One body... Really. but it was propped against the stern rail when someone saw it as all the search parties were coming in for the day... About an hour ago. The guards on duty hadn't seen anything. but it was there, sir. On lieutenant Little's orders, Shanks and I made the crossing as quickly as we could to inform you, captain. Shanks Mare as it were.'
'it? One body? Back on the ship?' this makes no sense at all to the terror's captain. 'I thought you said both strong and Evans were back.'
third lieutenant Irving's entire face is frostbite white now. 'They are, captain. Or at least half of them. When we went to look at the body propped there at the stern, it fell over and... Well... Came apart. As best we can tell, it's Billy strong from the waist up. Tommy Evans from the waist down.' "

Ship's Carpenters set up a "blind" for the Marines to hide in. They stake out a poor little lamb as bait, while they sit in there with their guns, hoping the creature will show up. Sir John franklin, the expedition's leader, is invited to sit in the blind and watch while they wait.
P.181:
"Sir John noticed two black objects lying close together in the lowest part of the icy depression - dark stones perhaps? buttons or coins Left behind as remembrance of lieutenant Gore by some seaman filing by the burial site precisely a week ago? And in the dim, shifting light of the snowstorm the tiny black circles, all but invisible unless one knew exactly where to look, seemed to stare back at Sir John with something like sad reproach. he wondered if by some fluke of climate two tiny openings to the sea itself had remained open during all the intervening freeze and snow, thus revealing these two tiny circles of black water against the gray ice.
The black circles blinked. 'Ah... Sergeant...,' began sir john.
the entire floor of the burial crater seemed to erupt into motion. Something huge, white and gray and powerful exploded toward them, rising and rushing at the blind and then disappearing on the south side of the canvas, out of sight of the firing slit.
the marines, obviously not sure of what they had just seen, had no time to react.
a powerful force struck the south side of the blind not three feet from Le VesConte and Sir john, collapsing the iron and rending the canvas.
the Marines and Sir John leaped to their feet as the canvas ripped above them and behind them and to the side of them, black claws the length of Bowie knives tearing through thick sail. Everyone was shouting at once. There came a terrible carriin reek.
Sergeant Bryant raised his musket -- the thing was inside, it was inside, with them, among them, surrounding them with the circumference of inhuman arms - but before he could fire there was a Rush of air through the Reek of predator breath. The Sergeant's head flew off his shoulders and out through the firing slit and skittered across the ice.
Le VesConte screamed, someone fired a musket -- the ball striking only the Marine next to him. The top of the canvas blind was gone, something huge blocked the opening where the sky should be, and just as Sir John turned to throw himself forward out of The ripping sale canvas, he was struck by a terrible pain just below both knees..."
The creature has ripped off Sir John's legs below the knee. He ends up underwater, falling through the ice where the creature had risen from.
"To his left. The opening was some 10 yards or less his left. The ice was high enough above the Blackwater here that Sir John could raise his head, set the top of his bald and freezing pate against rough ice, gasp in air, blink water and blood out of his eyes, and actually see the glow of the saviour's light not 10 yards away... Something huge and wet Rose between him and the light. The darkness was absolute. His inches of breathable air were suddenly taken away, filled with the rankest of Carrion breath against his face. quote
'please...,' began sir john, sputtering and coughing. Then the moist reek enveloped him and huge teeth closed on either side of his face, crunching through bone and skull just forward of his ears on both sides of his head."

Sir John had been governor of Van diemen's land, southeast of Australia. He was a good man, but he didn't cooperate with the plantation owners there.
Now he carries the shame of being recalled by the colonial office in england.
P.195:
"from sophia, crozier learned that Sir John had gone, in the public eye at least, from being 'the man who ate his shoes,' [from an earlier polar expedition] to his self-styled description of 'a man who wouldn't hurt a fly' then quickly to a description widespread on the Tasmanian peninsula of 'a man in petticoats.' this last calumny, Sophia assured him, came from the colony's dislike of Lady Jane as much as it had from Sir John's and his wife's attempts to improve things for the natives and prisoners who laboured their in inhuman conditions.
'you understand that the previous governor simply loaned out prisoners for the local plantation owners' and City business tycoons' insane projects, took their cut of the profits, and kept their mouths Shut,' explained Sophia cracroft as they walked in the shadows of the government house gardens. 'Uncle John has not played that game.'
'insane projects?' said crozier. He was very aware of Sophia's hand on his arm as they walked and spoke in hushed whispers, alone, in the warm near dark.
'if a plantation manager wants a new road on his land,' said sophia, 'the governor is expected to loan him 600 starving prisoners - or a thousand - who work from dawn until after dark, chains on their legs and manacles on their wrists, through this tropical heat, without water or food, being flogged if they fall or falter.'

Anyhow, Sir John is dead, and crozier, captain of the terror, is expedition leader. They ultimately abandoned the ice-blocked ships, and crossed the pack ice to King Williams island.
There is a mutinous group among the crew, led by a chaos-controlled man named Hickey. when they have already traveled a considerable length, actually coming close to Adelaide island, close to the mouth of back River, they stage a mutiny. They tell Captain crozier that they want to return to the ice packed ships, and they want to take their share of boats, weapons and provisions. The captain refuses them. But these mutineers aren't done yet.
When the survivors have made their way to what they name rescue camp, on the southeast point of king William's Island, hopefully awaiting the passage of a British ship sent out to rescue them, the mutineers leave, captain Crozier grants them one shotgun, and divides up the remaining food and provisions.
But they trick him, sending one of their group (Golding) back to the camp and telling them that Lady silence (an Inuit) and the creature have been found wounded on the ice. That crozier needs to come immediately. Then they are ambushed.
P.638-9:
"Magnus Manson dumped the bodies of Lane and Goddard in front of his master, Cornelius hickey.
'are they alive?' rasped crozier. the captain's arms were still pinned behind him by thompson, but now that the muzzles of two shotguns were trained on him, the blade was no longer at his throat.
Hickey leaned over as if to inspect the men, and, with two smooth, easy moves, cut both their throats with a knife that had suddenly appeared in his hand.
'not now they ain't alive, Mr high-and-mighty crozier,' said the caulkers mate.
The blood pouring out onto the ice looked black in the moonlight.
'is that the technique you used to slaughter John irving?' ask Crozier, his voice shaking with fury.
'fuck you,' said hickey.
cozier glared at Robert golding. 'I hope you got your 30 pieces of silver.'
Golding snickered.
'George,' said the caulkers mate to thompson, standing behind the captain. 'Crozier carries a pistol in his right great coat pocket. Pull it out. Dicky, you bring the pistol back to me. If crozier moves, kill him.'
Thompson removed the pistol while Aylmore kept his purloined shotgun aimed. Then Aylmore walked over, took the pistol and the box of cartridges Thompson had found, and backed away, shotgun raised again. He crossed the short moonlit space and handed the pistol to hickey.
'all this natural misery,' Dr goodsir said suddenly. 'why do you men have to add to it? Why does our species always have to take our full measure of god-given misery and terror and mortality and then make it worse? Can you answer me that, Mr hickey?' "

A-men is what I say to that.

the expedition ends in disaster, as you would expect. None of the two ship's crews makes it out alive, though Captain crozier is 'rescued' in a way nobody would expect. Since history has no answers for us, besides finding markings of the earliest Graves from the expedition, dan Simmons has made up his own answers. And it makes for a thoroughly entertaining read. ( )
  burritapal | Oct 23, 2022 |
I loved all the positive reviews so I kept reading but last night I just couldn't go on. Stopped around page 200. ( )
  debbie13410 | Oct 22, 2022 |
I have to borrow a cliche from some blurb(s) from somewhere-or-other and admit that this thing is, for all its length "compulsively readable." It just kept shoving along &, well, rocking. Superb entertainment. I only flagged a little toward the end when I drew myself together and thought "OK, but for this to all 'work,' I have to solidly believe in the validity of some indigenous religion involving big ugly beast gods? I don't even buy into Judaeo-Christianity, Dan." But this really only nicked the fun. I know this isn't Faulkner, but Simmons really is ssssooo good. ( )
  tungsten_peerts | Oct 22, 2022 |
After reading so many negative reviews on this book, I started reading it with a little more apprehansion than I normally would. I've now finished and not quite sure if I was reading the same book.

I found the descriptive pages served only to underline the isolation and total abandonment and futility the members of the Erebus and Terror must of felt. I actually felt chilly sat on my comfy couch at home, as I helped pull provision to King William Land, and marveled at how these early explorers could have undertaken such tasks, so ill prepared.

As to the "terror" on the ice, the inclusion of this aspect just added to the story, and did not play a huge part in the novel for me, so I was not overly disappointed that there were not more pages dedicated to it.

A very good read, and I'm glad I decided to read it for myself rather than judge it on the opinions of others. ( )
  Melline | Aug 13, 2022 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 198 (següent | mostra-les totes)
An immobilized ship can be a potent metaphor for certain states of existential unease, as it is in Conrad’s novella “The Shadow-Line” (114 pages in the Everyman’s Library edition) or Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner” (625 lines). And the polar regions, frigid as death itself, have always provided an exceptionally hospitable environment for horror: Mary Shelley (“Frankenstein”), Edgar Allan Poe (“The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket”), H. P. Lovecraft (“At the Mountains of Madness”) and John W. Campbell (“Who Goes There?”) have all dreamed dire happenings at one pole or the other, at much more modest length. (“The Terror” is dedicated, with “many thanks for the indelible Arctic memories,” to 12 members of the cast and crew of the classic 1951 movie based on Campbell’s story: “The Thing From Another World.”) But of the many possible approaches to making artistic sense of the Franklin fiasco, just about the least promising, I’d say, would be to turn it into an epic-length ripping yarn.
afegit per SnootyBaronet | editaThe New York Times, Terrence Rafferty
 
Skilfully, horribly, Simmons details the months of darkness – the temperatures of -50F and lower; the shrieking groans of the ice; the wind; the hunger – from the multiple perspectives of the men on board the ship, and with such detail that I defy readers not to grab another jumper. He adds in another, more deliberate evil: a stalking, polar bear-like monster which tracks over the icy wastelands around the ships, picking the men off one by one. "To go out on the frozen sea in the dark now with that … thing … waiting in the jumble of pressure ridges and tall sastrugi was certain death," he writes. "Messages were passed between the ships now only during those dwindling minutes of half-light around noon. In a few days, there would be no real day at all, only arctic night. Roundtheclock night. One hundred days of night." What a horrifying thought.
afegit per SnootyBaronet | editaThe Guardian, Alison Flood
 

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This elusive quality it is, which causes the thought of whiteness, when divorced from more kindly associations, and coupled with any object terrible in itself, to heighten that terror to the furthest bounds. Witness the white bear of the poles, and the white shark of the tropics; what but their smooth, flaky whiteness makes them the transcendent horrors they are? That ghastly whiteness it is which imparts such an abhorrent mildness, even more loathesome than terrific, to the dumb gloating of their aspect. So that not the fierce-fanged tiger in his heraldic coat can so stagger courage as the white-shrouded bear or shark.

-Herman Melville "Moby Dick" (1851)
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This book is dedicated, with love and many thanks for the indelible Arctic memories, to Kenneth Tobey, Margaret Sheridan, Robert Cornthwaite, Douglas Spencer, Dewey Martin, William Self, George Fenneman, Dmitri Tiomkin, Charles Lederer, Christian Nyby, Howard Hawkes, and James Arness.
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Lat. 70 degrees -05' N., Long. 98 degrees -23' W.
October, 1847
Chapter 1. Crozier: Captain Crozier comes up on deck to find his ship under attack by celestial ghosts.
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Wikipedia en anglès (3)

Their captain's insane vision of a Northwest Passage has kept the crewmen of HMS Terror trapped in Arctic ice for two years without a thaw. But the real threat to their survival isn't the ever-shifting landscape of white, the provisions that have turned to poison, or the ship slowly buckling in the grip of the frozen ocean. The real threat is whatever is out in the frigid darkness, stalking their ship, snatching and brutally killing their fellow seamen. Captain Crozier, who has taken over the expedition after the death of its original leader, Sir John Franklin, draws equally on his strengths as a mariner and on the mystical beliefs of the Eskimo woman he's rescued as he sets a course on foot out of the Arctic and away from the insatiable beast. But every day the dwindling crew becomes more deranged and mutinous, until even Crozier begins to fear there may be no escape from an ever-more-inconceivable nightmare.

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Hachette Book Group ha publicat 5 edicions d'aquest llibre.

Edicions: 0316017442, 1600240763, 0316017450, 0316008079, 1600244858

 

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