IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers,…
S'està carregant…

Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle… (edició 2014)

de Joshua Davis (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses
2069107,848 (4.22)Cap
In 2004, four Latino teenagers arrived at the Marine Advanced Technology Education Robotics Competition at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They were born in Mexico but raised in Phoenix, Arizona, where they attended an underfunded public high school. No one had ever suggested to Oscar, Cristian, Luis, or Lorenzo that they might amount to much-but two inspiring science teachers had convinced these impoverished, undocumented kids from the desert who had never even seen the ocean that they should try to build an underwater robot.And build a robot they did. Their robot wasn't pretty, especially compared to those of the competition. They were going up against some of the best collegiate engineers in the country, including a team from MIT backed by a $10,000 grant from ExxonMobil. The Phoenix teenagers had scraped together less than $1,000 and built their robot out of scavenged parts. This was never a level competition-and yet, against all odds . . . they won!But this is just the beginning for these four, whose story-which became a key inspiration to the DREAMers movement-will go on to include first-generation college graduations, deportation, bean-picking in Mexico, and service in Afghanistan.Joshua Davis's Spare Parts is a story about overcoming insurmountable odds and four young men who proved they were among the most patriotic and talented Americans in this country-even as the country tried to kick them out.… (més)
Membre:normahamilton
Títol:Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream
Autors:Joshua Davis (Autor)
Informació:FSG Originals (2014), Edition: 1, 240 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream de Joshua Davis

Cap
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

Es mostren 1-5 de 9 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Joshua Davis' book "Spare Parts", reminded me a lot of that 1998 film "Stand and Deliver". That movie was about a Los Angeles area high school teacher who inspired underpriveledged children to learn and achieve high marks on college level calculus tests. In "Spare Parts", Davis writes about four poor teens, children of illegal immigrants from Mexico, who were inspired by their science teacher and won top honors in a robotics competition, beating college teams from across the country, including one of the best, if not THE best, of our nations engineering schools (MIT).

It's one of those uplifting, feel-good stories about underdogs striving, doing the right thing, and coming out on top - to a point. While the story does describe the academic struggles and overcoming their environment to succeed, their academic success did not fully translate to continued life success due to their immigrant status.

Given that illegal immigration, calls for building a great wall between the Southwest U.S. and Mexico, and anger against any program which sounds like amnesty are hot topics of debate now, especially with the 2016 Presidential Election coming up, the book also serves a secondary purpose of placing a human face on the topic. The boys were brought to the U.S. as young children, and knew no other Country than the U.S. They worked hard, succeeded, and wanted to live their live in the only Country they knew, however strict immigration laws made that all but impossible.

That led to a brief mention of The Dream Act legislation introduced by Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT) a number of years ago, to allow children of illegal immigrants who have met certain conditions to remain in this Country. Not quite balancing that side of the argument, Davis does provide a brief discussion of the argument against allowing these children to remain in the Country. Davis presents this side of the argument by talking mostly about the tough stance of Sheriff Joe Arpaio, and some of the legislation introduced in the State of Arizona to prevent illegal immigrants from benefiting from state funds. Clearly the argument in the book favors the softer stance of many Democrats rather than the harsher perspective of most Republicans, but if you look carefully, at least you will hear some of the rational of those opposing the Dream Act in Congress.

But the political argument discussed above is not the focus of the book. It probably only occurred to me to mention it because Candidate Donald Trump made a big splash in the first Republican Presidential Debate by focusing on the negative side of our porous southern border. So it's being discussed by people on both sides of the political spectrum now. But the book's actual focus isn't on the political debate, but on the inspiring story of a teacher and his underdog students, who through hard work, grit, and determination were able to overcome their handicaps and compete against the brightest and best, and come out ahead.

I understand the book has already been made into a movie. Hopefully, it will be true to the book. ( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
What an amazing story that was in turns something to cheer and something to weep. I could write an entire commentary on how we treat immigrants in this country, but I am here to talk about the book. The author does a wonderful job of sucking you into each student's life, from Mexican roots to struggles with post-high school life. The structure and writing keep you engaged throughout, and not once does the pacing or commentary leave you bored. My heart was with these guys as they worked their way to the final competition, and I wept with joy when they started getting awards. I really hope they all end up with their dreams coming true -- I especially hope that Cristian manages to finish school. I was heartbroken that he had to drop out because of Arizona's laws. ( )
  ladypembroke | May 17, 2019 |
You read this to find out if this foursome can actually beat colleges like MIT that they're competing against. You're introduced to the teenagers, how they wound up in United States, and how the high school robotics program helped kept them in school, giving their school a boost as well. To remain in the robotics program they had to maintain a certain grade point average and it became a family away from home where they could express their ideas. They were always in danger when crossing state lines that they could be picked up by ICE and came close when their teachers took them to California to see the facilities where they'd compete. Fortunately, they were traveling in school vans and their teachers managed to get them by the checkpoint and back home. One started the Robodevils at Arizona State University before deporting himself so he could enter the United States legally. I only put this book down when I was forced to. ( )
  lisa.schureman | Mar 22, 2018 |
Feel-good story that will likely work better as a movie. Four teenagers born in Mexico and growing up in poverty went up against the best student engineers in the country (that had both great access to education and funds). It's the story of hard beginnings, finding mentors/teachers who are willing and the occasional helping hand along the way. Sometimes these stories don't end well: deaths, deportation, membership in gangs, jail, etc. Luckily that's not the case here.
 
It was an interesting premise to look at the potential of some of the people who come across the border from Mexico. In light of certain remarks made by certain US Presidential candidates, this was an actually really interesting read to see how these young men had the interest and willpower, but perhaps needed some guidance, opportunity and some help here and there to go up against some of the "best and the brightest" who came from some of the best schools and had the backing of major corporations, etc.
 
Unfortunately a lot of it is lost. Author Davis is a journalist and as always that style rarely ever works for me. Initially I was drawn into the stories and childhoods of these young men from crossings back and forth across the border, to growing up with little, to struggles with the language barrier, the fear of deportation, distinct possibilities of getting into gangs or drugs, etc. But Davis keeps switching the narrative too many times to too many perspectives when it might have been good to keep just one chapter to introduce the students, one to introduce the teachers/mentors and go from there. The book really is quite interesting in parts but tends to wax and wane quite a bit. It's really a pity because it is a great story that could easily be hammered into a 2, 2.5 hour movie that could even be Oscar-bait if done right and marketed well.
 
Still, it was an interesting read. I certainly don't regret it and think it's pretty relevant in light of the current discussion of immigration. Not to mention education, poverty and many of the other secondary and tertiary issues that go along with these larger ones.
 
That said, I'd borrow it from the library unless you have a special interest in the above or robotics. ( )
  HoldMyBook | Feb 11, 2018 |
Undocumented high school students in Arizona compete in an underwater robotics contest, going against MIT and other colleges. This true story is inspirational, both for what the boys accomplished and for what the teachers did to guide them. You will have more faith in the young people today after reading this, although it may challenge what you think about illegal immigrants. It's not as cut and dried as it would seem. ( )
  hobbitprincess | Sep 17, 2016 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 9 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (1)

In 2004, four Latino teenagers arrived at the Marine Advanced Technology Education Robotics Competition at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They were born in Mexico but raised in Phoenix, Arizona, where they attended an underfunded public high school. No one had ever suggested to Oscar, Cristian, Luis, or Lorenzo that they might amount to much-but two inspiring science teachers had convinced these impoverished, undocumented kids from the desert who had never even seen the ocean that they should try to build an underwater robot.And build a robot they did. Their robot wasn't pretty, especially compared to those of the competition. They were going up against some of the best collegiate engineers in the country, including a team from MIT backed by a $10,000 grant from ExxonMobil. The Phoenix teenagers had scraped together less than $1,000 and built their robot out of scavenged parts. This was never a level competition-and yet, against all odds . . . they won!But this is just the beginning for these four, whose story-which became a key inspiration to the DREAMers movement-will go on to include first-generation college graduations, deportation, bean-picking in Mexico, and service in Afghanistan.Joshua Davis's Spare Parts is a story about overcoming insurmountable odds and four young men who proved they were among the most patriotic and talented Americans in this country-even as the country tried to kick them out.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.22)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 5
3.5 1
4 8
4.5 2
5 13

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 170,289,086 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible