IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

On Immunity: An Inoculation

de Eula Biss

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
6694526,329 (4.04)46
Upon becoming a new mother, Eula Biss addresses a chronic condition of fear: fear of the government, the medical establishment, and what is in children's food, mattresses, medicines, and vaccines. Biss investigates the metaphors and myths surrounding the conception of immunity and its implications for the individual and the social body. As she hears more and more fears about vaccines, Biss researches what they mean for her own child, her immediate community, America, and the world.… (més)
Afegit fa poc perbiblioteca privada, Iudita, BobonBooks, LegendaBookery, jeclem, bacyc81, Septima, EugeneCarlson
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 46 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 45 (següent | mostra-les totes)
This book is a series of essays about a variety of topics and issues that all pertain to immunity and vaccination. It is a timely read although it was published in 2014 and therefore contains no discussion of Covid. Although this book has plenty of science in it, it is primarily a book of reflection and I enjoyed the author's musings. ( )
  Iudita | Sep 17, 2021 |
Summary: A collection of essays about vaccines, immunity, fears, risks, and related concerns about environmental pollutants and other dangers faced by the human community.

A few caveats at the beginning of this review. One is that this book was published in 2014. So it was not written in the context of our current polemics about vaccines to combat COVID-19. Also, the author is not a scientist but a talented writer who has won a number of literary awards and is currently an Artist in Residence at Northwestern University. She is the daughter of an oncolgist. She is also the mother of a child suffering many allergies.

The essays in this work reflect her background as an academic, writer, child of a doctor, and a mother. It is evident that she extensively researched this work. She explores the history of vaccination from which we learn that the term comes from the Latin name for the cowpox virus, from which the vaccinated developed immunity to smallpox. She explores how the understanding of immunity developed over the years, earlier issues with the safety of vaccination, and contemporary research and reporting systems that confirm the high level of safety and rarity of risks.

She makes an important point that the effectiveness of vaccines isn’t simply for individuals but for the communities within which they live and travel. Vaccines limit or eliminate infections when a large portion of the population is vaccinated. At one point she challenges the flawed reasoning that one doesn’t need to get vaccinated because others are. This only works when very few think that way, and an ethic that you can’t commend universally runs afoul of Kant’s categorical imperative. She observes, “Immunity is a shared space—a garden we tend together.”

But she is also a mom who wants to do the right thing for her child. Her personal concerns lead her to a sympathetic examination of the fears of others, the sources of reports about autism, and various contaminants in vaccines. She both acknowledge the continuing influence of these reports and how extensive research studies have refuted all of them. She explores the question of risk, and how highly unlikely risks, like a rare side effect that may be attributed to a vaccine, and the much more prevalent and often more serious risks of the disease vaccines are meant to prevent. In the end, she comes down on the side of vaccination–but hardly in an unthinking, “sheeple” fashion. She gently challenges being more afraid of inoculation than disease, and the luxury of entertaining fears that most of the world can’t afford.

She considers other chemicals in our environment from triclosan in our liquid soaps to plastics in our foods, drink bottles, and mattresses. She comes to recognize that there is no absolute immunity we can confer on ourselves or our children from all that could render harm. She experiences this herself when she required transfusion after nearly dying from an inverted uterus during childbirth, and has to trust the safety of the blood she is given. She balances this sense of our vulnerability with our amazing immune system, that can handle multiple vaccines at once because it responds to thousands of threats every day. She asks hard questions, reviews research and doesn’t simply accept authority, but also acts on the best evidence of the science.

The book wanders a bit. It is a collection of essays, not strictly a scientific or history piece. But it is also a human piece, rather than a clinical account or research paper. Biss does what we all need to do–listen, ask questions, be the parent, and learn to discern between flawed and reliable information, and make the best decisions one can. In many ways, this may be a helpful read for those with concerns about vaccines. It challenges us to make decisions not from a place of narcissism but enlightened self interest that also considers the common good. It is written from outside the current polemics, but reflects the concerns so many of us have. ( )
  BobonBooks | Sep 16, 2021 |
A set of musings on vaccinations and their impact on society, acting as both a history of medicine and also personal essays on the anxieties of new motherhood. Biss makes interesting parallels (e.g., although health demands individual responsibility it still depends on the health of the broader community – representative democracy is a similar type of ‘empowered powerlessness’) but the overall flow was choppy. Previously mentioned facts kept repeating as if being introduced for the first time, which felt like lazy editing. ( )
  jiyoungh | May 3, 2021 |
This was a very well written and truly thought provoking book. There were just countless lines I want to remember and to quote.

Biss did a wonderful job of speaking honestly about the anxieties and worries she experienced in her son's first few years of life, while balancing it with talking about vaccinations, immunity, etc. from social, historical, economical, and cultural points of view. She never shames anyone for how they feel about these topics. And even though it often feels like an 'us' vs. 'them' type of conversation, she delves into the nuances without making the text feel bogged down or dense. The short chapters and the interweaving of history and her personal story with science keep the text engaging and interesting.

Despite the book having been published in 2014, it feels like it could have been published just this year. ( )
1 vota Sara_Cat | Mar 6, 2021 |
On Immunity: An Inoculation was another one of my pandemic reads. I thought it was time to move on from books about pandemics and epidemics to the next stage, vaccination and immunity. Eula Biss’ book is different to what I expected, which is entirely my fault after reading so many science/medicine heavy books. This is a look at immunity from the other side, the humanities if you like. It’s incredibly well researched on both the science and the literature sides, comparing Dracula and other literature to how people view vaccination and disease.

The book is divided into essays of similar lengths, so it’s easy to pick up and read just one or several. Biss became interested in the subject when she had a child and realised how divisive an issue immunisation was, followed by disease, allergies and health in general. She discusses the fear of the unknown, the possible (including those rare adverse effects) and the rumours and misinformation that spread like wildfire. (It’s never the good news stories that do). It’s all done in a very balanced way that’s easy to read. Biss clearly backs up her statements with facts, both historical and present day. Her argument is clear and well researched, but she is never scolding of alternative viewpoints. It’s gentle and persuasive without taking the hard, unchanging lines that scientists sometimes take (myself included). While I missed the hard science, the statistics and the detailed studies, I realise it’s not what the everyday person wants. This is an insight into how real people think (not just those who agree with vaccination, but those who waver and those who oppose) and may be more persuasive than graphs and numbers. From chicken pox lollipops (licked by real children with real chicken pox!) to the anti-vaccine movement, it’s an infinitely interesting read. ( )
  birdsam0610 | Feb 27, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 45 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en italià. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
For other mothers, with gratitude to mine
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
The first story I ever heard about immunity was told to me by my father, a doctor, when I was very young.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (1)

Upon becoming a new mother, Eula Biss addresses a chronic condition of fear: fear of the government, the medical establishment, and what is in children's food, mattresses, medicines, and vaccines. Biss investigates the metaphors and myths surrounding the conception of immunity and its implications for the individual and the social body. As she hears more and more fears about vaccines, Biss researches what they mean for her own child, her immediate community, America, and the world.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.04)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5
3 17
3.5 13
4 71
4.5 8
5 37

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

HighBridge Audio

Una edició d'aquest llibre ha estat publicada per HighBridge Audio.

» Pàgina d'informació de l'editor

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 162,256,890 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible