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Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in…
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Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End (edició 2014)

de Atul Gawande (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
3,6622312,516 (4.45)523
Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession's ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families of the terminally ill.
Membre:hopespringsbiblio
Títol:Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End
Autors:Atul Gawande (Autor)
Informació:Metropolitan Books (2014), Edition: 1, 304 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
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Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Being Mortal: Illness, Medicine and What Matters in the End de Atul Gawande

  1. 10
    Final Exam: A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality de Pauline W. Chen (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Written by experienced and dedicated physicians, these compelling books question American health care's emphasis on management and technique to the detriment of human relationships between doctors and patients, especially when the patient's mortality is an important consideration.… (més)
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Anglès (229)  Hongarès (2)  Italià (1)  Totes les llengües (232)
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4.5 stars

Hooooboy, this book is kind of tough, especially the first part. The litany of things that naturally happen to the human body as it ages is pretty damned depressing. And that's if everything goes well. If you have any sort of illness or infirmity, it just gets worse.

Thankfully, it progressed to a happier note, namely that we need to de-medicalize aging and death. Stop and consider that just because there is a medical procedure/treatment/etc. for an illness, that doesn't mean we should use it. There's no one right answer for everyone. But I liked what the author learned from the Hospice people, about asking the individual what they want out of their life right now, and how they want their end to be handled.

I think this should be required reading for every human, but especially those with elderly relatives who will reaching this point, and the tough questions will need to be answered.

I listened to the audiobook, and the narrator was very good. ( )
  ssperson | Apr 3, 2021 |
Vital Questions at the End
Review of the Metropolitan Books hardcover edition (2014)
Whenever serious sickness or injury strikes and your body or mind breaks down, the vital questions are the same: What is your understanding of the situation and its potential outcomes? What are your fears and what are your hopes? What are the trade-offs you are willing to make and not willing to make? And what is the course of action that best serves this understanding? - quote from Being Mortal
Surgeon Atul Gawande does an extraordinary job in this book with examining senior and elder care and giving examples of the various situations and thinking that has evolved in the past century or so. The examples are primarily from the United States where Gawande practices (in Boston), but there are some constrasts with other locations such as India and the Netherlands included.

The primary thesis is that modern medicine may often be adding to a prolonged suffering of a patient when presenting the treatment options and that asking the right questions would instead assist them in make a better quality of the end of life decision. This is starkly brought home in various examples, but the one that sticks in my mind is the patient that said that whatever option would allow them to "watch football on TV and eat chocolate ice cream" would be their preferred choice. The answer may seem banal, but it may be the simplest final enjoyments that we can have that can make the difference.

This is not an easy book to read at any time, but it is certainly better to read it before you need it. It took me almost two months to get through it with some library renewals in between. Having had recent end of life situations with parents and relatives made it harder for me. I still realized that there were important lessons conveyed by Gawande and that it was admirable that he was able to capture and distill them as well as he did in this overview.

Thanks to Karan & the Peterborough Hospice Book Club for the information about this book and to Liisa for the PBS Frontline documentary link!

Trivia and Link
PBS Frontline did a documentary film about the topic of Being Mortal with author Atul Gawande and you can watch it on YouTube here. ( )
  alanteder | Feb 24, 2021 |
I received this book by coincidence in my Book Riot Quarterly box, but Gawande's article "Letting Go" has stuck with me for years after reading it in the New Yorker. I'd recommend the whole book (the essay is included), but the article can be found here:

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/08/02/letting-go-2

( )
  CarrieT | Feb 17, 2021 |
I think anyone who who might have to help loved ones deal with their deaths in the future, or who may one day be faced with their own mortality, will find this book enormously interesting and helpful. You know who you are. ( )
  giovannaz63 | Jan 18, 2021 |
Everyone needs to read this book. ( )
  nhmyster | Jan 3, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 232 (següent | mostra-les totes)
His new book, “Being Mortal,” is a personal meditation on how we can better live with age-related frailty, serious illness and approaching death.

It is also a call for a change in the philosophy of health care. Gawande writes that members of the medical profession, himself included, have been wrong about what their job is. Rather than ensuring health and survival, it is “to enable well-being.”
afegit per melmore | editaNew York Times, Sheri Fink (Nov 6, 2014)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (8 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Gawande, Atulautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Petkoff, RobertNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Pradera, AlejandroTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Röckel, SusanneÜbersetzerautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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I see it now—this world is swiftly passing.
—the warrior Karna, in the Mahabharata

They come to rest at any kerb:
All streets in time are visited.
—Philip Larkin, "Ambulances"
Dedicatòria
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To Sara Bershtel
Primeres paraules
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I learned about a lot of things in medical school, but mortality wasn't one of them.
Citacions
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Modern scientific capability has profoundly altered the course of human life. People live longer and better than at any other time in history. But scientific advances have turned the processes of aging and dying into medical experiences, matters to be managed by health care professionals. And we in the medical profession have proved alarmingly unprepared for it.
In other words, our decision making in medicine has failed so spectacularly that we have reached the point of actively inflicting harm on patients rather than confronting the subject of mortality. If end-of-life discussions were an experimental drug, the FDA would approve it.
The simple view is that medicine exists to fight death and disease, and that is, of course, its most basic task. Death is the enemy. But the enemy has superior forces. Eventually, it wins. And in a war that you cannot win, you don't want a general who fights to the point of total annihilation. You don't want Custer. You want Robert E. Lee, someone who knows how to fight for territory that can be won and how to surrender it when it can't, someone who understands that the damage is greatest if all you do is battle to the bitter end.
… our driving motivations in life, instead of remaining constant, change hugely over time and in ways that don’t quite fit Maslow’s classic hierarchy. In young adulthood, people seek a life of growth and self-fulfillment, just as Maslow suggested. Growing up involves opening outward. We search out new experiences, wider social connections, and ways of putting our stamp on the world. When people reach the latter part of adulthood, however, their priorities change markedly. Most reduce the amount of time they spend pursuing achievement and social networks. They narrow in. Given the choice, young people prefer meeting new people to spending time with, say, a sibling; old people prefer the opposite. Studies find that as people grow older they interact with fewer people and concentrate more on spending time with family and established friends. They focus on being rather than doing and on the present more than the future.
Life is choices, and they are relentless. No sooner have you made one choice than another is upon you.
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Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession's ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families of the terminally ill.

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