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A Spool of Blue Thread (Random House Large…
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A Spool of Blue Thread (Random House Large Print) (edició 2015)

de Anne Tyler (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
2,4701834,407 (3.61)293
L'Abby Whitshank sempre comença a explicar de la mateixa manera la història de com va enamorar-se del seu marit, Red Whitshank, un dia que bufava una brisa suau, el 1959. Tota la família —les dues filles i els dos fills, els néts i fins i tot el gos fidel— seuen al porxo i escolten plàcidament com l'Abby explica per enèssima vegada la història que han sentit tantes vegades. Però ara tot és diferent: l'Abby i en Red s'estan fent grans, i la família ha de prendre moltes decisions —com i qui se'n farà càrrec, què passarà amb la casa on viuen, que el pare d'en Red va construir amb dedicació obsessiva.… (més)
Membre:ClaridgeLibrary
Títol:A Spool of Blue Thread (Random House Large Print)
Autors:Anne Tyler (Autor)
Informació:Random House Large Print Publishing (2015), Edition: Large Print, 560 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Mystery, Large Print

Detalls de l'obra

A Spool of Blue Thread de Anne Tyler

  1. 20
    Estimada vida de Alice Munro (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Both books focus on ordinary lives and families with a strong sense of place. Both are written by a master at the top of her game.
  2. 10
    The Stone Angel de Margaret Laurence (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: These character-driven novels sensitively present elderly protagonists whose memories unfold to reveal the charms and struggles of family life. Both have a strong sense of place: Baltimore in A Spool of Blue Thread; Manitoba in The Stone Angel.… (més)
  3. 10
    Some Luck de Jane Smiley (cat.crocodile)
  4. 00
    The Chaperone de Laura Moriarty (thea-block)
  5. 00
    Algú de Alice McDermott (zhejw)
  6. 00
    Tara Road de Maeve Binchy (thea-block)
    thea-block: Common themes and tones run throughout both stories: home-town feel; descriptions of the lifetimes of somewhat ordinary/somewhat extraordinary people; love and loss, regret and gratefulness, parents and children.
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» Mira també 293 mencions

Anglès (178)  Neerlandès (2)  Alemany (1)  Francès (1)  Totes les llengües (182)
Es mostren 1-5 de 182 (següent | mostra-les totes)
I loved this book! I loved how the story is less about what happens and more about the characters. I love how little bits of their lives get introduced over the course of the novel. Details are introduced later than you think they should be ("why didn't the author tell us that sooner?") and yet that's so much more realistic. We meet people and learn about their lives over time and they share parts of themselves in different ways and surprise us with what we don't know and how it feels at odds with what we thought about them.

I read this book because I loved the characters in Vinegar Girl, and I was not disappointed. A gentle, flowing look at normal and complicated people trying to do their best. Tyler offers no answers, little insight, but fantastic presentation.

( )
  ColourfulThreads | Feb 18, 2021 |
“A Spool of Blue Thread” (2015) by Anne Tyler is a novel as much about a house as it is about a family.

Four generations of the Whitshank family live in this large Baltimore house, built by Junior Whitshank for somebody else. To Junior, a homebuilder by trade, this particular house is so special he is determined to one day own it himself, and one day he does. He and Linnie Mae raise their children, Merrick and Red, there, and Red and his wife, Abby, raise their own family there. Later their grandchildren spend part of their early lives in the same house. The novel ends when the last Whitshank moves out.

Other than the house, does the novel have a central character? For several pages various members take command of the story, then fade into the background. Junior and Linnie Mae, perhaps the most interesting characters of all, don't take the spotlight until late in the novel, the beginning of the story nearly becoming its end. Abby dominates early on, Red not so much until after her death. Restless, unpredictable, undependable Denny, their son, may be the true protagonist, his instability a counterpoint to the stability of the house.

Denny has never come to terms with the fact that Stem, his brother, isn't actually a Whitshank. Abandoned by his mother, Stem is the son of one of Red's employees who dies. Abby insists upon keeping the little boy until his mother or some other suitable relative can be found, but soon decides just to keep him as her own. Everyone else in the family accepts that decision, but not Denny, whose feelings don't emerge until later after he has grown up and become a mysterious wanderer usually out of touch with his family.

When Abby becomes mentally unstable late in life, however, Denny comes home to stay, then is resentful when Stem comes, too, bringing his family with him. Not until the end of the novel does Tyler reveal the mystery of Denny's private life, a secret he never shares with his family.

Tyler has written a number of outstanding novels about Baltimore families. “A Spool of Blue Thread” ranks high on that list. ( )
  hardlyhardy | Feb 3, 2021 |
The spool of blue thread, which tumbled out when Denny sought it to repair his father's clothes (there is a word for it but I forgot what it is) signifies forgiveness between parents and children. The book is well-written with interesting characters but lacks connection. Perhaps it's the way the book is structured. Tyler led with the current generation and interspersed it with the story of Junior Whitshank and Linnie, before coming back to the present. The story of Junior and Linnie is rather odd, I am not sure what to make of it. You know there is probably a woman in Denny's life, given the hushed phone calls and the generous landlord who let him keep his stuff for free. Nevertheless, Tyler could have revealed more of her and their relationship instead of only giving us a peak at the end. I think it may make the book more interesting. ( )
  siok | Jan 24, 2021 |
I love Anne Tyler and this had me right in the pocket for the first 2/3's. Then it went downhill for me but not so much that I stopped reading, even a lacklustre Anne Tyler is better than most. I read this Anne Tyler because the critics loved it but maybe I should rethink that metric. I didn't read the last one because the critics didn't like it but I think I'm going to now.
I read this book on my e-reader and I am increasingly finding that the e-reader lessens my enjoyment of a book. I may be off of it. ( )
  FurbyKirby | Jan 5, 2021 |
I love the cover. ( )
  xKayx | Dec 14, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 182 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Readers anticipating an easy “domestic” novel will be terrifically surprised...Tyler’s genius as a novelist involves her ability to withhold moral judgment of her characters.....Tyler is in full command of her scenes and her characters, grounding her reader in time and space in every sequence of this tightly written and highly readable novel. .....Breaking with a conventional linear structure, the final and most compelling chapters belong to Abby and relay the series of events that led to her falling in love with Red, a story that exists only in Abby’s memory, told here to the reader. The discoveries in these final pages are likely to force readers to reflect back on the earlier chapters and view them in an entirely new — and much darker — light. Here we see the truth about every love story: It was merely an accident of chance.
 
Readers of any age should have no trouble relating to Abby's complaint that "the trouble with dying ... is that you don't get to see how everything turns out. You won't know the ending." Her daughter protests, "But, Mom, there is no ending." To which Abby replies, "Well, I know that." And then Tyler adds the unspoken kicker her fans have come to look for: "In theory." We can only hope that Tyler will continue spooling out her colorful Baltimore tales for a long time to come.
afegit per vancouverdeb | editaNPR
 
Now 73, Tyler has hinted that this might be her last novel. If so, she may not have ended with a masterpiece, but she has given us plenty of reminders of her lavish strengths: the quiet authority of her prose; the ultimately persuasive belief that a kindly eye is not necessarily a dishonest one; and perhaps above all, the fact that, 50 years after she started, she still gives us a better sense than almost anyone else of what it’s like to be part of a family – which for most of us also means a better sense than almost anyone else of what it’s like to be alive.

And if all that’s not enough to earn a top-table place, then maybe it’s time to rethink the criteria for qualification.
 


Indeed, very little happens in her books. Characters get caught up in repetitive, dead-end conversations which merely fill the gaps, and where silence, existentialist terror and a fear of death continually lingers.

But in this passing of time — where seasons change, flowers wither, then bloom again, people marry, babies are born and the elderly die slowly with dignity — Tyler then weighs in with her own subtle commentary as a narrator who exudes tremendous skill and precision.

It is in these details that she attempts to convey truth, meaning and esthetic beauty. And Tyler’s narrative is a brilliant testament to why the novel still provides an enormously important role in our culture, allowing us to capture the little bits of humanity that somehow seem to bypass us in the real world. ...A Spool of Blue Thread primarily focuses on domestic dreams and disputes, daily ceremonial acts and relationships. Love, loss, and death are about the only certainties the author can guarantee. Family is all we have, Tyler’s prose seems to suggest.
 
Tyler is in the top rank of American writers, and moments in this novel have an affinity with Canada’s Alice Munro too. But what she has that neither Robinson nor Munro possess to the same degree is an irrepressible sense of the comedy beneath even the most melancholy surface – or sometimes peeking just above it – in human affairs.

Tyler is good on irony too....Tyler is sensitive to the tragicomedy of old age and its indignities. Her writing is characterised by an amused, sweeping tolerance that acknowledges imperfection at all ages. ..Tyler writes with witty economy..It takes organised wit to write about human muddle as Tyler does, without once losing our attention or the narrative’s spool of blue thread.
 
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Late one July evening in 1994, Red and Abby Whitshank had a phone call from their son Denny.
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L'Abby Whitshank sempre comença a explicar de la mateixa manera la història de com va enamorar-se del seu marit, Red Whitshank, un dia que bufava una brisa suau, el 1959. Tota la família —les dues filles i els dos fills, els néts i fins i tot el gos fidel— seuen al porxo i escolten plàcidament com l'Abby explica per enèssima vegada la història que han sentit tantes vegades. Però ara tot és diferent: l'Abby i en Red s'estan fent grans, i la família ha de prendre moltes decisions —com i qui se'n farà càrrec, què passarà amb la casa on viuen, que el pare d'en Red va construir amb dedicació obsessiva.

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