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Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone

de Diana Gabaldon

Altres autors: Donna Sinisgalli (Family tree), Jeffrey L. Ward (Mapmaker)

Altres autors: Mira la secció altres autors.

Sèrie: Outlander (9)

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8572121,292 (4.21)50
#1 New York Times bestselling author Diana Gabaldon returns with the newest novel in the epic Outlander series. The past may seem the safest place to be ... but it is the most dangerous time to be alive. ...Jamie Fraser and Claire Randall were torn apart by the Jacobite Rising in 1746, and it took them twenty years to find each other again. Now the American Revolution threatens to do the same. It is 1779 and Claire and Jamie are at last reunited with their daughter, Brianna, her husband, Roger, and their children on Fraser's Ridge. Having the family together is a dream the Frasers had thought impossible. Yet even in the North Carolina backcountry, the effects of war are being felt. Tensions in the Colonies are great and local feelings run hot enough to boil Hell's teakettle. Jamie knows loyalties among his tenants are split and it won't be long until the war is on his doorstep. Brianna and Roger have their own worry: that the dangers that provoked their escape from the twentieth century might catch up to them. Sometimes they question whether risking the perils of the 1700s--among them disease, starvation, and an impending war--was indeed the safer choice for their family. Not so far away, young William Ransom is still coming to terms with the discovery of his true father's identity--and thus his own--and Lord John Grey has reconciliations to make, and dangers to meet ... on his son's behalf, and his own. Meanwhile, the Revolutionary War creeps ever closer to Fraser's Ridge. And with the family finally together, Jamie and Claire have more at stake than ever before.… (més)
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Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone is the ninth book in Diana Gabaldon’s wildly popular Outlander series. This one spans more than a year and a half from June 1779 to February 1781. Just returned from the future, Bree and Roger and their kids settle back into life on Fraser’s Ridge. The first good chunk of the book encompasses interactions between Jamie and Claire and their family and friends on the ridge. The Revolutionary War is still fairly distant, but coming closer by the day. Some of the residents of the ridge are Loyalists and as tensions begin to mount, Jamie considers creating a partisan band (aka militia group) to help protect the ridge during the battle he knows is coming. Claire as usual deals with her fair share of medical issues. Eventually Roger and Bree and Ian and Rachel travel away from their homes on the ridge, each couple dealing with their own personal matters, but of course, in time, return to Jamie and Claire’s open arms. Elsewhere Lord John and William continue their search for John’s nephew, Ben, who’s been missing for some time. By the end, Lord John is tricked by a ne’er-do-well who knows of John’s proclivities and plans to use them against him if his demands aren’t met.

Jamie and Claire will always and forever be the backbone of this series. However, rather than them being involved in some type of wartime dealings or battles, this volume sees them mostly living quietly on the ridge. That’s not to say that there isn’t trouble, because unfortunately it does tend to follow them around. When Bree returned from the future, she brought along her other father’s book about the history of Scots in North Carolina that had just been published before she left. As Jamie reads this book, he gets the eerie feeling that Frank Randall is talking directly to him. Between the book and his time traveling family members’ knowledge of what’s to come, he knows that eventually even the ridge won’t be safe from the Revolutionary War and that a battle will soon be fought not far from the ridge. Frank’s book also makes mention of someone named James Fraser who dies in that battle. Never one to shirk away from such things, Jamie sets about strategizing how to handle what the future holds, which involves him creating a small militia unit and deciding how to utilize them. Meanwhile, some new tenants on the ridge who are Loyalists start stirring a bit of trouble for Jamie, which he manages to evade but not without getting hurt. Ultimately though, it’s the upcoming battle on King’s Mountain in which fate will decide whether Jamie lives or dies.

While probably more than fifty percent of the story is told from Jamie and Claire’s perspectives, many other characters have their own POV scenes. Most prominent of these is Brianna and Roger. After returning from the future, they and their children, Jem and Mandy, spend a good deal of time simply settling back into life on the ridge and getting reacquainted with their family and friends there. Roger decides to finally pursue formal ordination as a Presbyterian minister, which takes them on a journey to Charles Town, where they meet up with Fergus and Marsali who are still publishing their newspaper. Jamie has tasked Fergus with obtaining guns for his new militia and Roger and Bree smuggle them back home in a creative way. From there they travel to Savannah, where Lord John has gotten Bree a commission to paint a portrait for a friend of his. They spend several months in Savannah, during which Bree is able to become acquainted with her half-brother, William, something that Lord John and Jamie were both hoping would happen. Roger accidentally gets swept up in a Revolutionary war battle in Savannah, while Bree also agrees to paint a portrait of a fallen rebel officer. But eventually the pair return home, where Roger follows Jamie into battle on King’s Mountain. And then, by the end, it appears that the future may have caught up to them in the past when someone who’d previously caused trouble for them shows up.

William is another prominent POV character. He’s still struggling with his identity crisis, and since he now knows that he’s actually a bastard, he’s strongly considering the possibility of abdicating his title as the Earl of Ellesmere, something that his Uncle Hal tells him won’t be easy to do. While contemplating his life, he spends a great deal of time traveling around. First, he’s off searching for his cousin, Ben, who he’s pretty sure isn’t dead after finding an imposter in Ben’s supposed grave. William’s journey takes him to Mount Josiah plantation, which has seen better days, and there he meets up with Lord John’s friend and sometimes lover, Manoke, as well as John Cinnamon, the illegitimate son of Lord John’s erstwhile cousin-in-law, Malcolm Stubbs, who John has been providing for. Because of this, John Cinnamon thinks that Lord John may be his father, so he accompanies William back to Savannah in search of his parent, and along the way, the two become friends. Back in Savannah, William meets Ben’s supposed widow, Amaranthus, and her child. Amaranthus makes a rather scandalous proposal, which tempts William, but before anything happens between them, he’s off on another journey, this time in search of his cousin, Dorothea, whose husband, Denny, has been taken captive and imprisoned by British forces. What he finds when he arrives is anything but what he expected. And later, after returning once again to Savannah and finding that Amaranthus has left, he goes searching for her as well, but comes back from that journey to find Lord John missing.

Additional POV characters include Ian and Rachel, who initially are just enjoying life on the ridge with Ian’s mother, Jenny, and their new son, nicknamed Oggy, until they can find just the right name for him. However, Ian receives distressing news about an attack on the Mohawk village where his ex-wife, Emily, lives. Concerned for the welfare of Emily and her children, Ian decides to travel North to check on them, and Rachel and Jenny insist on accompanying him. Rachel is a bit nervous about meeting Ian’s former flame, but all works out in the end. While there, they pay a visit to Joseph Brant, a college-educated Native American who once traveled to England to meet the King and who was an influential leader among the Iroquois. Jamie also tasks Ian with checking in on Silvia, the Quaker mother of three daughters who assisted Jamie at the beginning of the previous book, and as it turns out, she’s desperately in need of help which Ian gladly provides.

The final perspective we get is Lord John’s. He and his brother, Hal, are still trying to track down Hal’s son, Ben, while caring for his “widow,” Amaranthus, and her infant son. The two men are also involved in a major battle for Savannah, which the British win for now. John meets his charge, John Cinnamon, and tells the young man the truth about his parentage. John’s step-brother and erstwhile lover, Percy, shows up again, seemingly wanting to rekindle a relationship with John, although he also still has designs on Fergus, wanting Fergus to claim his birthright as the supposed son of the Compte St. Germain. Then there’s the sneaky Ezekiel Richardson who isn’t exactly who he seems and who may be a double, or perhaps even triple, agent possessing lots of information and dirt on a variety of different people, including a knowledge of John’s same-sex relationships which could get John hanged. However, what Richardson really wants is rather surprising, but until the man can get it, John finds himself Richardson's prisoner, leading to a bit of a cliffhanger ending.

Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone was another engaging installment of the Outlander series that I very much enjoyed. It’s a bit slower than some of the other books, because Jamie and Claire and company aren’t involved in as much action and adventure in this one. There are battles and skirmishes that they get caught up in, but they’re fewer and farther between than in most of the previous books. Except for the battle on King’s Mountain, Jamie and Claire stay put on Fraser’s Ridge, finishing their new house, and just enjoying a relatively quiet life. It’s the younger generation who find themselves in farther flung locales and getting into a bit more trouble. That’s not to say that there aren’t some new developments for our favorite romantic couple. They temporarily take in another foster child, and perhaps even more importantly, Claire discovers some unexpected newfound powers that could make a big difference moving forward. Then there’s the whole time travel aspect, which seems to be unraveling as more people learn about it, and new characters are entrusted with Claire’s (and Bree’s and Rogers’s) secret. I look forward to seeing where this all goes. I was a little disappointed that we didn’t get to see more of Fergus and Marsali and Denny and Dottie (I love both of these couples), but given how far away from the ridge they are, I guess it was to be expected. I do love, though, that Ms. Gabaldon never really forgets any characters and how ones that might not have been seen for a while, sometimes pop up again, giving readers new opportunities to learn more about them. Such is the case with Silvia and her daughters, as well as Emily and her oldest son who we’d previously been led to believe might be Ian’s. As always, I had a good time reading this new chapter in the Outlander saga. Even if it was a bit slower than most, it was still very enjoyable. I just love inhabiting this world, but now that I’m almost fully caught up (except for a couple of side novellas), it’s going to be a torturous wait for the next book, which could be several more years in the making.:-( ( )
  mom2lnb | Sep 18, 2022 |
In the words of Claire Fraser "Jesus H. Roosevelt Christ." Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone is the newest installment of the Outlander series. This book picks up in 1779 with Jamie and Claire reunited with Brianna and Roger, who have experienced their own adventures in the time they were gone. While this should be a joyous occasion, the threat of war hangs over the Fraser clan. Fraser's Ridge can't remain out of the conflict for long. What with split loyalties running rampant among the tenants and the effects of war becoming more apparent.

Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone is one of those reads that turns out to be disappointing. I started the book as soon as it came out and then left it unfinished for months. When I thought of the book it was never with a desire to know what happened next but more of an obligation to finish because I had come so far in the series. Jamie and Claire are by no means the focus of this novel. A great deal of time is spent on side stories and outside events that it is easy to lose sight of the greater narrative of Jamie and Claire's love story.

Brianna and Roger return to the Ridge with gifts, one being a book written by Frank Randall which discusses Highlander's involvement in the American Revolution. Frank Randall's book seems to be meant as a warning to Jamie foretelling the death of our beloved Highlander. Are Frank's words as a historian to be trusted? Is this his way of getting revenge on Jamie after all these years? Only time will tell as the Fraser's race headlong towards the events at Kings Mountain. Will Jamie and Claire's love for each other save them yet again?

We pick up with William who is still struggling with the revelation of his paternity and what this means for the life he had seen for himself. He has resigned his commission and is ready to set aside the title of Lord of Ellesmere, in fact refusing to be called by this title. William and Lord John Grey work to reestablish their relationship with these new revelations; but what will William do when Lord John Grey finds himself in trouble? To whom can he turn for help? Are events all conspiring to bring the Murray's, Grey's, Fraser's and Mackenzies' all back together.

In order to answer some of these questions one must endure an overwhelming amount of subplot and side stories. Along the way elements of the novel appear cliche, simply because we have encountered the exact same issue and situation in previous novels within the series. It is hard to miss that Jamie and Claire do not get their fair share within this story. The reader begins to wonder if our love for Jamie and Claire is enough to withstand Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone. ( )
  BookReviewsbyTaylor | Aug 13, 2022 |
Each book in the Outlander series contains so much information that I am never sure how to review one. In the first place, in what genre do these books fit? Because of the time travel aspect I am tempted to choose science fiction except that there is really no scientific basis for what Gabaldon imagines the mechanism to be. So is it fantasy? Perhaps, but there are no mythical beings or magic which is what I always think fantasy should include. Is it historical fiction? Possibly, at least in the case of this book which is set in 1779 and 1780 during the American Revolution, but some of the books have bounced between more contemporary times and historic times. I see that LibraryThing also categorizes it as romance but I think that does a disservice to all of the historical research that has gone into making this book. If I had to choose one genre it probably would be historical fiction but perhaps it is just best to categorize it as "Fiction and Literature".

As I said, this book takes place in 1779 and 1780. Jamie, Claire, Brianna and Roger are together in Fraser's Ridge, North Carolina as Brianna and Roger made their way back in time with their two children at the end of the last book. These main characters are all supporters of the Revolution but there are other people living in the vicinity who are Loyalists. This will create problems in the months to come. Lord John Grey and his brother Hal are headquartered in Savannah with the British army. William, raised by Lord John but fathered by Jamie as William discovered in the last book, arrives in Savannah together with his friend John Cinnamon. John Cinnamon is under the mistaken impression that Lord John is his father. Lord John disabuses him of that notion but does tell him who is father is. Living with Lord John is Amaranthus who was married to Hal's son, Ben, and has had his child. Ben has been declared dead but William, who found another man's body in his grave in the last book, has doubts whether is actually is. William and John Cinnamon decide to stay in Savannah and Lord John thinks it would be a good opportunity for Brianna and William to get to know each other. He sends an invitation to Jamie asking for Brianna to come to Savannah to paint the portrait of a wealthy man's wife. Brianna, Roger and the children decide to go, taking Germain, Fergus and Marsali's oldest child, with them to return him to his parents in Charles Town. They are also taking a goodly amount of gold with them to enable Fergus to acquire guns for Jamie's militia requirements. Jamie's nephew, Ian, with his wife, Rachel and Jamie's sister Jenny take off in the other direction to New York to check on Ian's Mohawk ex-wife who was reported to be ill and might have died leaving several offspring parentless. Battles are fought, sieges are made, people die and are injured and through it all people have to eat and give birth and make love. At the end of the book all the main characters are still alive but Lord John is very much in danger. We'll have to wait for the next book to discover his fate. It looks like William is going to get to know Jamie very much more.

The title of the book refers to the advice an old peddler gives Claire when he brings her a hive of bees. He tells her "...that you got to talk to 'em regular...So you tell 'em what's happening--if someone's come a-visitin', if a new babe's been born, if anybody new was to settle or a settler depart--or die. See, if somebody leaves or dies and you don't tell the bees, they take offense, and the whole lot of 'em will fly right off." I wonder how many modern bee-keepers continue this tradition. ( )
  gypsysmom | Aug 11, 2022 |
This was just too long with too many characters for me to truly enjoy tt. ( )
  DrApple | Jun 17, 2022 |
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» Afegeix-hi altres autors (1 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Diana Gabaldonautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Sinisgalli, DonnaFamily treeautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Ward, Jeffrey L.Mapmakerautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Huey, BelinaDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hunt, RobertAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Norey, VirginiaDissenyadorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Porter, DavinaNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

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#1 New York Times bestselling author Diana Gabaldon returns with the newest novel in the epic Outlander series. The past may seem the safest place to be ... but it is the most dangerous time to be alive. ...Jamie Fraser and Claire Randall were torn apart by the Jacobite Rising in 1746, and it took them twenty years to find each other again. Now the American Revolution threatens to do the same. It is 1779 and Claire and Jamie are at last reunited with their daughter, Brianna, her husband, Roger, and their children on Fraser's Ridge. Having the family together is a dream the Frasers had thought impossible. Yet even in the North Carolina backcountry, the effects of war are being felt. Tensions in the Colonies are great and local feelings run hot enough to boil Hell's teakettle. Jamie knows loyalties among his tenants are split and it won't be long until the war is on his doorstep. Brianna and Roger have their own worry: that the dangers that provoked their escape from the twentieth century might catch up to them. Sometimes they question whether risking the perils of the 1700s--among them disease, starvation, and an impending war--was indeed the safer choice for their family. Not so far away, young William Ransom is still coming to terms with the discovery of his true father's identity--and thus his own--and Lord John Grey has reconciliations to make, and dangers to meet ... on his son's behalf, and his own. Meanwhile, the Revolutionary War creeps ever closer to Fraser's Ridge. And with the family finally together, Jamie and Claire have more at stake than ever before.

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