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The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of…
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The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion (2014 original; edició 2014)

de Meghan Daum (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
2961277,473 (3.93)9
"A master of the personal essay candidly explores love, death, and the counterfeit rituals of American life In her celebrated 2001 collection, My Misspent Youth, Meghan Daum offered a bold, witty, defining account of the artistic ambitions, financial anxieties, and mixed emotions of her generation. The Unspeakable is an equally bold and witty, but also a sadder and wiser, report from early middle age. It's a report tempered by hard times. In "Matricide," Daum unflinchingly describes a parent's death and the uncomfortable emotions it provokes; and in "Diary of a Coma" she relates her own journey to the twilight of the mind. But Daum also operates in a comic register. With perfect precision, she reveals the absurdities of the marriage-industrial complex, of the New Age dating market, and of the peculiar habits of the young and digital. Elsewhere, she writes searchingly about cultural nostalgia, Joni Mitchell, and the alternating heartbreak and liberation of choosing not to have children. Combining the piercing insight of Joan Didion with a warm humor reminiscent of Nora Ephron, Daum dissects our culture's most dangerous illusions, blind spots, and sentimentalities while retaining her own joy and compassion. Through it all, she dramatizes the search for an authentic self in a world where achieving an identity is never simple and never complete"--… (més)
Membre:RedSonja76
Títol:The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion
Autors:Meghan Daum (Autor)
Informació:Farrar, Straus and Giroux (2014), 256 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:to-read

Informació de l'obra

The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion de Meghan Daum (2014)

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» Mira també 9 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 12 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Not really my kind of book. Of course I didn't read the chapter "honorary dike" that's just too pretentious. She is very privileged. An "animal lover" who, of course, eats animals. ( )
  burritapal | Oct 23, 2022 |
I became acquainted with Meghan Daum's work when she read at a 2016 Writers' Conference, a section from her essay "Invisible City," a very self-reflective piece on living in LA and the literary acquaintances she met there, including a rather entertaining if densely name-dropping starstruck anecdote. This piece is Daum at her best--a charming wit that can tell of the elite literary world without feeling exclusive. Unfortunately, this world as source of her content makes her stunningly ignorant in other essays and areas, as in "On Not Being a Foodie," where she is apparently unaware of the existence of those of other social classes and persuasions than her foodie friends, and "Honorary Dyke," which is at once offensive, an appropriation of queer culture, and thoroughly reinforcing the gender binary by means of Daum's insistence that she is an outlier from it.
Her perspectives are interesting and her craft smooth and well-managed, but her insistence on projecting her specific experience to the universal ultimately outweighs her skill. ( )
  et.carole | Jan 21, 2022 |
3.5 stars -- I just can't commit to whole numbers! This book of essays is very well-written, but I would be lying if the subject matter didn't rub me the wrong way on occasion. In one (less enchanting) essay about Joni Mitchell, Daum credits her with teaching "that if you didn't 'write from a place of excruciating candor, you've written nothing." Daum does just that. Some of her confessions are painfully honest, especially her reasons for not wanting children, and her involvement in and understanding of the foster care system. She does warn readers in her intro that "this book recounts some pretty unflattering behavior" and in that regard it is refreshing. She is not afraid to tackle tough topics (mother-daughter relationships, marriage) with honesty and candor. And she is good at letting the reader in on the joke. None of it is meant to be self-aggrandizing or preachy. Instead she is just sharing some observations and experiences and widening the reader's world view (micro-view, in some instances) just a little. Best of the lot was "On Not Being a Foodie" and "Diary of a Coma." ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
I am extremely picky about my books of essays. I like very few. I LOVED this one. I read them sporadically over the course of about a month. Sometimes I wouldn't even read a whole one at once. And yet, the thoughts and ideas and concepts not only stuck with me, but REALLY stuck with me. I ended up writing about a couple of her topics on my own online journal. This was really a very excellent read. ( )
  susandennis | Jun 5, 2020 |
The Unspeakable falls into that category of book that I do not trust myself to rate because I find Daum's take on the world so utterly relate-able. It is humbling to find out that (what you considered) your particular brand of antisentimentalism is more likely the result of your culturo-historical context than of your own brilliant particularity. Funny, sharp & occasionally tender; recommended especially to what Daum calls "phantom dykes," the hetero-women who resist pop-culture's idea of the "feminine," and instead venture to forge their own "authentic" identities. I don't exactly know what authenticity means to Daum, but it seems close to Maggie Nelson's "sodomitic mother," i.e. a woman who always exceeds/overflows her societally structured roles. ( )
  reganrule | Oct 24, 2017 |
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"A master of the personal essay candidly explores love, death, and the counterfeit rituals of American life In her celebrated 2001 collection, My Misspent Youth, Meghan Daum offered a bold, witty, defining account of the artistic ambitions, financial anxieties, and mixed emotions of her generation. The Unspeakable is an equally bold and witty, but also a sadder and wiser, report from early middle age. It's a report tempered by hard times. In "Matricide," Daum unflinchingly describes a parent's death and the uncomfortable emotions it provokes; and in "Diary of a Coma" she relates her own journey to the twilight of the mind. But Daum also operates in a comic register. With perfect precision, she reveals the absurdities of the marriage-industrial complex, of the New Age dating market, and of the peculiar habits of the young and digital. Elsewhere, she writes searchingly about cultural nostalgia, Joni Mitchell, and the alternating heartbreak and liberation of choosing not to have children. Combining the piercing insight of Joan Didion with a warm humor reminiscent of Nora Ephron, Daum dissects our culture's most dangerous illusions, blind spots, and sentimentalities while retaining her own joy and compassion. Through it all, she dramatizes the search for an authentic self in a world where achieving an identity is never simple and never complete"--

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