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Permanence de Karl Schroeder
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Permanence (edició 2003)

de Karl Schroeder (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
325559,475 (3.63)4
Young Rue Cassels of the Cycler Compact -- a civilization based around remote brown dwarf stars -- is running from her bullying brother, who has threatened to sell her into slavery. Fleeing in a shuttle spacecraft from the sparsely populated and austere comet-mining habitat she has lived in her whole life, she spots a distant, approaching object, and stakes a legal claim to it. It is not the valuable comet she hoped for but something even more wonderful, an abandoned Cycler starship. Her discovery unleashes a fury of action, greed, and interstellar intrigue as many factions attempt to take advantage of the last great opportunity to revitalize - and perhaps control - the Compact. This is the story of Rue's quest to visit and claim this ship and its treasures, set against a background of warring empires, strange alien artifacts, and fantastic science. It is a story of hope and danger, of a strange and compelling religion, Permanence, unique to this star-faring age, and of the re-birth of life and belief in a place at the edge of forever.… (més)
Membre:Belarius
Títol:Permanence
Autors:Karl Schroeder (Autor)
Informació:Tor Books (2003), Edition: 1st, 480 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Speculative Fiction, Science Fiction

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Permanence de Karl Schroeder

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» Mira també 4 mencions

Es mostren totes 5
This is a very typical Male Science Fiction Author book (the good kind, at least) in that it had absolutely mind-bendingly fascinating sci-fi ideas and forgettable characters and relationships between them. When I think about this book a year from now, I will not remember the name of a single character, but I will definitely remember the unique aliens, provocative ideas, and universe-altering technology. ( )
  dreamweaversunited | Apr 27, 2020 |
This book is a top notch sci-fi read, blending new ideas with a classic feel, and has immediately catapulted Karl Schroeder into my favorite authors list. This book falls into the category of hard sci-fi, but with interesting characters, a well thought out story, and some philosophy thrown in for good measure.

The scientific concepts that are integrated into the setting offer a look at some of the more recent ideas about what exists between solar systems, from Kuiper Belt objects to Brown Dwarfs and their possible planetary systems, referred to in the book as the Halo worlds. The setting implies the frequency of these objects is higher than what we know of today, making these dark worlds reachable with a pre-Faster-Than-Light technology. Humans have discovered FTL drives as well, but they seem to require the deep gravity wells of normal stars to work.

The aliens of this universe are few and far between as well, and none of them are anything like humans, so much so that humanity still feels very alone in the universe. I love authors who pull off unique aliens as that is what I expect such an alternative evolutionary track would do, and it helps to make it feel like it could be real.

The book includes some philosophical & religious exploration as well, centered mostly on what it takes to build a sustainable galactic type civilization that could encompass many different intelligent species. The religion of many people in the current universe is called Permanence. This religion is based on the methodology and technology required for maintaining the current human civilization and also on expanding it. The religion still maintains it's following among the Halo worlds, but is repressed on the worlds around stars, where FTL can be used. From a philosophical side, the book explores the implications of FTL vs. non-FTL travel between worlds, and it's affects on the sustainability of a civilization spread across the stars.

There's plenty of politics here as well, with the repressive like Right Economy which nano tags everything with a value and ownership, allowing the enforcement of payment on all uses of information and items owned by others. Ultimately this appears as a libertarian dystopia, exposing the flaws in extreme economic libertarianism. There's also some repression of freedom of religion as well, but there is not much else discussed to expose what other types of rights might also be repressed.

As my initial introduction to Karl Schroeder, I found the book highly enjoyable and look forward to reading many more novels by him. In fact, I think he has managed to claim a spot in my short list of all-time favorite authors. ( )
  speljamr | May 8, 2014 |
(Reviewed December 16, 2007)

After the majesty and brilliant imagination of Ventus, the author's previous novel, I had high expectations for Permanence. Schroeder showed such a competence for world-creation and characterisation in Ventus, I felt like I wanted to live in his book, and was sorry to have to read the last page. It was like an enormous, delicious feast that left me wanting more. So it was to my immense disappointment to find that in contrast, reading Permanence is like eating a bowl of mud. To wit: Thin, underdeveloped characters (excuse me, but how old is Rue Cassels? She acts like a teenager, but is apparently much older. All I could see through the entire book was a shrill, emotionally overwrought child wandering around like she owned the place and somehow being wooed by a 45 year-old sexually repressed subservient monk), a plot that packs a million things in, but still manages to feel meandering, pointless and dull (I honestly thought part one was an experiment in plot drift), a central conceit that seems clever and imaginative at first but quickly becomes frustrating and repetitive (I never want to read the word "cycler" ever again), and an irritating propaganda-like push for something called NeoShintoism (note the pretentious CamelCase), whose practitioners are the most smug, self-satisfied douche bags this side of a Tibetan monastery. And to top it all off, just as the most interesting aspect of the book starts to get going (the discovery and utilisation of the Jentry's Envy), suddenly we're trapped on the most boring, insipid, poorly developed planet I have ever experienced in a sci-fi novel for a quarter of its length! Why?? What made Schroeder think it would be a good idea to abandon such a fascinating concept as an alien spacecraft designed specifically for other aliens to use and have his idiotic characters wander around aimlessly for two-hundred pages working through their bland childhood angst? Is his editor a naked mole rat? How could you not see that this makes for bad storytelling? It boggles the mind. And don't get me started on the ending. This book should have been titled "Deus Ex Machina, and How Not To Utilise It". People who say Absolution Gap's ending is bad (which it isn't if you read the rest of the stories set in the RS universe, but that's neither here nor there) should read this book and have their eyes opened to how truly bad endings can be.

You may be wondering, if I hated it so much, why I gave this book two stars instead of one. Well, there's genuinely interesting stuff in here. The exploration of the Jentry's Envy is fantastically imaginative and gripping, and the expectation that they would return to it is basically what kept me reading. The first chapter is tense and exciting and shows a promise never quite fulfilled, and the sense of cold, remote, empty space is palpable and something that I genuinely enjoy. But I can get that in pretty much any Alastair Reynolds or Greg Egan novel, and without all the lameness that comes with it in this case.

If you like deep space hard sci-fi, you will more than likely enjoy the first half of this book (although a word of warning, there is FTL travel), and especially if you enjoy the BDO style. But as soon as the Jentry's Envy is under human control, close the book, put it down, and walk away; there is nothing more for you here.

Seriously, how do you go from Ventus, to this? I am baffled. Baffled I tell you! ( )
  closedmouth | Jul 21, 2010 |
Good characters with an interesting plot. Some interesting ideas about civilisations. ( )
  gregandlarry | Feb 18, 2009 |
Es mostren totes 5
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Wikipedia en anglès (1)

Young Rue Cassels of the Cycler Compact -- a civilization based around remote brown dwarf stars -- is running from her bullying brother, who has threatened to sell her into slavery. Fleeing in a shuttle spacecraft from the sparsely populated and austere comet-mining habitat she has lived in her whole life, she spots a distant, approaching object, and stakes a legal claim to it. It is not the valuable comet she hoped for but something even more wonderful, an abandoned Cycler starship. Her discovery unleashes a fury of action, greed, and interstellar intrigue as many factions attempt to take advantage of the last great opportunity to revitalize - and perhaps control - the Compact. This is the story of Rue's quest to visit and claim this ship and its treasures, set against a background of warring empires, strange alien artifacts, and fantastic science. It is a story of hope and danger, of a strange and compelling religion, Permanence, unique to this star-faring age, and of the re-birth of life and belief in a place at the edge of forever.

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