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The Unwritten Vol. 11: Apocalypse de Mike…
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The Unwritten Vol. 11: Apocalypse (edició 2015)

de Mike Carey (Autor), Peter Gross (Il·lustrador)

Sèrie: The Unwritten TPBs (11), The Unwritten (Apocalypse #6 - #12)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1296170,177 (4)2
The three immortals--Wilson, Rausch and Pullman--are moving toward their respective endgames. But when was the last time they were all in the same room together? Answer- half a century ago, in Oxford, England. And the reasons for what they're doing now can be found in what they said to each other back then... Collects THE UNWRITTEN- APOCALYPSE #7-12.… (més)
Membre:kennydied
Títol:The Unwritten Vol. 11: Apocalypse
Autors:Mike Carey (Autor)
Altres autors:Peter Gross (Il·lustrador)
Informació:Vertigo (2015), 176 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:*****
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Informació de l'obra

The Unwritten Vol. 11: Apocalypse de Mike Carey

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A solid conclusion to "The Unwritten", which over the course of twelve volumes (11 collections and 1 original grahpic novel) has gradually gone from being a vaguely supernatural story about fame and identity to a contemplative epic on the relationships between stories, fiction and reality.

As the world is ending (or, one might argue, already has ended), Tom Taylor's last hope is to heal it by finding the literal Holy Grail. But to do so he has to enter the medieval romances, adhere to the knightly ideals therein, and prove worthy to gaze into the Chapel Perilous to find it. But perhaps the Grail is somehow also the doomsday horn sought by Utnapishtim, the First Killer, and perhaps finding it is not the best idea.

We're also treated to one last flashback to Tom's father's century of scheming, the issue "Inklings" being the highlight in an already strong final collection. The last few murky puzzle pieces are placed, and in the new light, his twelve volumes of machiavellian cold plotting suddenly take on a slight but definite streak of tragic self sacrifice.

The ending might feel a tad underwhelming (the story itself, fittingly, does seem concerned it might), but we got the big showdown ending, too, just a little earlier. Upon finishing, the way it did end felt inevitable and right to me. The final five volumes of "The Unwritten" never quite reached the heights of the first six volumes and the tie-in graphic novel, often feeling more about the ideas than about the characters, but this final chapter definitely pulls the average back in the right direction and made the journey feel worthwhile, whole and memorable. ( )
  Lucky-Loki | Oct 4, 2021 |
The last graphic novel series that I read by Mike Carey (Lucifer) got extremely existential towards the end, so I don't know why I expected The Unwritten to sort itself out. Carey got into the looping storyline far too early in this series, and I kind of got lost and couldn't be bothered to find my way back. That being said, I did enjoy the nods to different pieces of Literature (the Arthurian-cycle chapters from this volume were particularly well done), and they were really what kept me coming back to finish the series.

The conclusion, which basically results in the triumvirate of heroes and villains (Tom, Pullman, and the witchy nun) getting eaten by Moby Dick to properly reset the Universe, is a bit odd and anti-climatic. No one really gets what they want, and things basically seem to go back to normal except that Lizzie knows about the "story" that holds the world together and is making waves shirk her prescribed storyline. I get that she's trying to write her own story, but hasn't that been the central theme of the entire series? And if it was the goal for everyone to get to make their own choices why does she have to play the "hero" and wake people up from their lackluster lives like she does in the final scene? Maybe the story just got too big for Carey, so he had to tie it up in a simpler than expected manner, but it seems a bit off to me. ( )
  JaimieRiella | Feb 25, 2021 |
5 stars for the whole series, but what an ending. Probably needs to be read straight after volume 10, as the last volume and a half rattle along towards the conclusion. It's been a wild ride though, and would love to start from the start again. ( )
  6loss | Nov 7, 2019 |
The ending was just so prosaic and predictable, especially with the hero archetype that Tom took on. I wish that Carey had somehow figured out a way to circumvent story logic completely and still make sense. Also how was everything reset, except for Lizzie and Richie? ( )
  Bodagirl | Jan 14, 2016 |
Summary: Tom Taylor is on a quest for Maanim, the mythical object (horn / drum / grail) with the power to save the world… or to destroy it. But the old enemy Pullman is after it too, and while Tom wants the cup to heal Leviathan and save the world, Pullman is after the opposite - the death of Leviathan and his release from the endless stories of humankind. The easiest way to the grail is through Arthurian legend, but is Tom's quest noble enough, and is he of pure enough heart, to succeed? And if someone else lays hands on Maanim first, the results could be apocalyptic.

Review: It's hard to talk about this book without only talking about the ending… but a lot of stuff that came before the ending was really interesting. I liked the Arthurian flavor of the first part of this volume, and the swapping back and forth between them being "real" and part of the fiction (or as Richie puts it, them all suddenly becoming "bilingual in medieval bullshit") was funny, and well done. We also get some more of Wilson's and Pullman's back story, which was interesting (and featured the Inklings!) but probably would have had more of an impact if I'd re-read the rest of the series more recently. But as for that ending… I don't know, you guys, I like meta-fiction if it's done correctly, but this got to a level of meta-meta fiction, and it lost me. There's a big reset button that gets hit, and while I think that much of the stuff leading up to, and coming after, that big reset button is in keeping with the ideas put forth thus far in the series about stories having power, the logic of how the reset button works and what comes after is where I really got lost. (For instance, if everything's been reset, why does Lizzie have no memory of anything and is leading a completely different life but Richie is still a vampire?? Makes no sense.) I don't think this was a case where the story spun out of control - it still feels like Carey knew what his story was and where it was going all along. The issue was that I didn't entirely follow where that was, or why, so I ultimately wound up a little frustrated. 3.5 out of 5 stars.

Recommendation: Don't start at the end, obviously. The series as a whole, though, is a lot of fun for bibliophiles, since it pulls characters and stories from across genres, cultures, and history, and fans of Neil Gaiman, who also has a lot to say on the "stories are power" theme. The series is complex enough that I would benefit from being read of a piece and relatively close together, which you can do now that it's ended, you lucky ducks. ( )
1 vota fyrefly98 | Aug 31, 2015 |
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The three immortals--Wilson, Rausch and Pullman--are moving toward their respective endgames. But when was the last time they were all in the same room together? Answer- half a century ago, in Oxford, England. And the reasons for what they're doing now can be found in what they said to each other back then... Collects THE UNWRITTEN- APOCALYPSE #7-12.

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