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Skin de Kathe Koja
S'està carregant…

Skin (edició 1994)

de Kathe Koja (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
215998,515 (3.69)8
Koja, the most provocative new voice in contemporary horror since Clive Barker (Fangoria), makes her Abyss hardcover debut with this terrifying story of a woman obsessed with transforming her body into a work of art. Koja, who has more in common with Franz Kafka and Albert Camus than with Stephen King (San Francisco Chronicle), transcends the boundaries of horror with this tale of obsession.… (més)
Membre:tokyoadam
Títol:Skin
Autors:Kathe Koja (Autor)
Informació:Dell (1994), Edition: Reprint
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:to-read, hwa-reading-list

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Skin de Kathe Koja

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» Mira també 8 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 9 (següent | mostra-les totes)
While it was not quite as amazing as Kathe Koja's novel Strange Angels, I think no other book could ever quite match that experience, and the excellence of Koja's craft is still strikingly evident in this book. ( )
  apotheon | Dec 14, 2020 |
THE CIPHER! I don't even know what to say.

I've only recently joined the church of Koja. It may not be as big as some, Stephen King's say, but there are joys to be found in smaller congregations.

This is the story of Nakota and Nicholas who one day found a black hole, named it the funhole, and changed their lives forever. They stuck different things into the hole, (getting uncomfortable yet?), including bugs, a mouse, and then a hand. What happened to these items when they were thrust inside? You'll have to read this to find out!

I absolutely adore Ms. Koja's prose, and Joshua Saxon the narrator brought it home with flare. This must not have been an easy performance due to the style of the aforementioned prose-especially in the second half of the book because it's a stream-of-consciousness narrative. His voicing was phenomenal.

I'm a bit irritated with myself because the few clips I made of the audio that highlighted the prose apparently did not save. There were short, staccato-like descriptions that...stabbed at my heart. Beautiful, honest and evocative words that my brain immediately transferred to a visual-like a direct injection. For instance "...the flat was full of drizzly day." 7 words that draw a perfect scene. Brief, staccato, BAM: there's the picture-full and complete.

I could go on and on about this prose but I'll leave it at what I've written. Kathe Koja's writing probably isn't for everyone; the reviews seem pretty split on Goodreads. For me, however, I feel like I have been missing out out an author that is perfect for my dark and black heart. I'm on a mission to read everything she's written. I'm a Koja missionary, baby!

My highest recommendation!

*I received the audio-book from Audiobook Boom! and the narrator, in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it!* ( )
  Charrlygirl | May 5, 2020 |
Another story of art and obsession. A pretty good read, but it never approaches the psychological darkness of her first two novels. ( )
  chaosfox | Feb 22, 2019 |
Why? Just, why?

I'm sure there are people who think you just need to "get" this book in order to enjoy it, but honestly, there isn't much to be gotten. There's nothing disturbing or shocking in here that hasn't already been done -- before or after. I've read books a dozen times more shocking and disturbing and wholly unsettling, and in ones that used a lot fewer standard body-horror scenes and radical ideas to get the point across.

There's nothing in here all that thought-provoking. And the characters are all too flat, too detached from themselves, each other, and the reader, in order to evoke any sort of real emotions of any kind. They're just going through the motions here, slave to Koja's story.

I wanted to read this because it seemed dark and disturbing ... but it wasn't. Not even a little. Granted, this isn't a book that mainstream readers would seek out. But it isn't good either. Stream-of-conscious doesn't work here, primarily because half the time we don't even have a clear picture of what's going on, which kind of kills literally any suspense, horror or whatever Koja's trying to achieve.

Another thing that doesn't help the book is that it's so horribly dated in such a specific way that its dated-ness permeates throughout everything in the book. All books are dated in their own way, yes, of course. But the goal is to try to make a book that won't be dated 10 or 20 or more years down the line. Skin fails at this completely. It's so late 80s/early 90s ~hardcore art scene~ that it's almost painful to have to read about it. I doubt many people even back in 1993, when this book was published, could relate even remotely to what's going on in the extremist art scene here -- I'm sure that number is even smaller now.

But it's not just that this book is dated, it's that it's so try-hard that it's embarrassing. Koja is trying to say something here -- at least, I think -- but it's buried under so many layers of "shocking" acts and pretentious bullshit about art and self that it's not worth wading through all 300+ pages of it to get to the inevitable, predictable conclusion.

Maybe Koja was attempting to say that this sort of cultish, extremist art was total bullshit and was simply people just feeding off of mindless destruction. But it never comes across that way, we never see Koja wink at us from behind the words to let us know that she's not taking any of this seriously (and neither should we).

I mean, we, the reader, can see that Bibi is completely fucked up -- and Tess and even a random, mainstream-type newspaper reviewer can see it -- but nothing comes of it. Is this supposed to be a commentary on how mental illness is ignored and ultimately can end in tragedy? If so, the ending is far too rushed and pat to make good use of it. But again, I just don't see any sort of deeper meaning in this book.

I don't know what Koja was trying to do here, but it felt while reading this that she failed on every single fundamental level. ( )
  majesdane | Aug 8, 2017 |
Im not sure what it was about this novel that made me give it a semi low score. Im just going to put that star directly in the middle.
I got halfway thru, and then reached a limit where I said, I can not continue down this path because of the writing style. I then began skimming thru chapters and thoroughly read the end.
It was way too erratic and DRAGGGGGED. At some points I enjoyed it for being artistic and unique, but I then became irritated and wanted the author to just please, for the love of God, just write the story out plainly so I can read this easily and not stagger in interpretation. If I knew I would have to interpret metaphors and symbolism, I would have been prepared for it and read it at a different time of my life. I jumped in expecting a normal horror story and came out of it feeling full of poetry and raw emotion.
What I did love about the story, was the imagery and the rawness of the characters.

The plot was completely insane so I did enjoy that as well.
It was just the erratic writing style that rubbed me a bit wrong. Is this the signature style of this author? OK Ill admit It is indeed unique and different in a world of plain cement stones...

It was interesting to view this group of starving frugal artists. I know quite a few of them in real life and I do find their lives fascinating. I know quite a few bizarre artists I would reccomend this to. ( )
  XoVictoryXo | May 31, 2016 |
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Koja, the most provocative new voice in contemporary horror since Clive Barker (Fangoria), makes her Abyss hardcover debut with this terrifying story of a woman obsessed with transforming her body into a work of art. Koja, who has more in common with Franz Kafka and Albert Camus than with Stephen King (San Francisco Chronicle), transcends the boundaries of horror with this tale of obsession.

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