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NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the…
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NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity (edició 2015)

de Steve Silberman

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
7694721,313 (4.32)133
"A groundbreaking book that upends conventional thinking about autism and suggests a broader model for acceptance, understanding, and full participation in society for people who think differently. What is autism: a devastating developmental disorder, a lifelong disability, or a naturally occurring form of cognitive difference akin to certain forms of genius? In truth, it is all of these things and more--and the future of our society depends on our understanding it. WIRED reporter Steve Silberman unearths the secret history of autism, long suppressed by the same clinicians who became famous for discovering it, and finds surprising answers to the crucial question of why the number of diagnoses has soared in recent years. Going back to the earliest days of autism research and chronicling the brave and lonely journey of autistic people and their families through the decades, Silberman provides long-sought solutions to the autism puzzle, while mapping out a path for our society toward a more humane world in which people with learning differences and those who love them have access to the resources they need to live happier, healthier, more secure, and more meaningful lives. Along the way, he reveals the untold story of Hans Asperger, the father of Asperger's syndrome, whose "little professors" were targeted by the darkest social-engineering experiment in human history; exposes the covert campaign by child psychiatrist Leo Kanner to suppress knowledge of the autism spectrum for fifty years; and casts light on the growing movement of "neurodiversity" activists seeking respect, support, technological innovation, accommodations in the workplace and in education, and the right to self-determination for those with cognitive differences"-- "A groundbreaking book that upends conventional thinking about autism and suggests a broader model for acceptance, understanding, and full participation in society for people who think differently"--… (més)
Membre:idiopathic
Títol:NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity
Autors:Steve Silberman
Informació:Avery, Kindle Edition, 542 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
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Etiquetes:currently-reading

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NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity de Steve Silberman

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» Mira també 133 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 45 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Thoroughly researched, well written and badly needed account of autism, Asperger's, schizo-affective disorder, childhood schizophrenia...the malady called by many names over the years. Steve Silberman has done yeoman's work and a real service to families who have desperately needed light in the darkness of their children's mysterious behaviors. While reading this, I was at times infuriated, fascinated, and grief-stricken. Ultimately, the answers--to him--lie in adapting ourselves to the range of neurodiversity that exists. He favors expanding services over hunting for causes or cures. Whether that will be sufficient remains to be seen. ( )
  AnaraGuard | Nov 1, 2020 |
This is an important and necessary book, an excellent piece of journalism, a well-written and concise history, and a frequently emotionally difficult read. Everyone should read it.

There are three distinct narrative strands in this book. First, there’s the decade-by-decade medical history, which delves into the lives of important psychologists such as Asperger, Kanner, Lovaas, and Wing, and discusses the standard beliefs and treatments at the time (spoilers: resoundingly Not Good most of the time). Alongside the facts, Silberman uses this strand to expose the origins of present-day autism therapies and advice, such as the idea that autism can be regulated by diet or that it’s somehow the result of bad parenting. He gives context that’s lacking in the standard autism narrative, portrays the good and bad in both people and treatments, and most importantly to me, makes a point of mentioning less-known researchers, female researchers, and female patients.

The second strand is a history of autistic life and figures. Some of this spins out from the medical history—he follows up on child patients as adults, for instance—but there’s also a lot of looking at the past and asking, “What were autistic people doing at the time?” (His thesis here being that autism isn’t a new thing or a childhood thing, that autistic adults have always existed.) So there are sections on science fiction fandom, on ham radio, on early computing, and on early 2000s online activism and communities. He does also armchair diagnose historical figures, which I know is often fraught, but his cases are compelling at least to the extent of “autism is a spectrum.”

The third strand is parental activism—parents who refused to do the “right thing” and confine their kid in an asylum for the rest of their life, parents who looked into alternative treatments, parents who banded together to support each other and win political battles on behalf of their children. There’s more centering of women here (hooray!), but also discussion of how some of these organizations have drifted into questionable treatments (like eschewing vaccines or promoting chelation therapy) and questionable beliefs (like AutismSpeaks).

All this is woven together into a loose timeline, so that ham radio is side-by-side with early parent movements, applied behavioural therapy, and introduction of autism to the DSM. There’s enough bouncing within the time periods, though, that I’d have liked more concrete dates and possibly a timeline so I could keep things more straight in my mind.

Silberman clearly did a lot of research for this and I learned a lot, even if a lot of it was awful. I appreciated that he relayed the good and the bad throughout the book, that he made a point of reintroducing women as doctors, parents, and autistics, and that he also made a point of exposing the myths and fallacies within the pop culture autistic history narrative. (He didn’t often say he was doing that, but it was there.) He’s also clearly biased, as I mentioned above, and working towards the thesis of “it’s a spectrum, it’s always existed, we’re finally getting somewhere good with society and medicine now but we have a long way to go.” And like I hinted above, that’s rather feel-good for a specific (progressive) segment of the population.

To sum up: I found this a compelling and enlightening read, reasonably balanced, specific without being detailed, and engrossing enough I nearly missed my stop a few times and talked my coworkers’ ears off. It’s also a reasonably easy read in terms of style, but not an easy one for subject matter. (Abuse and bigotry make me mad.) I’d rec this to just about everyone, but am curious to hear if anyone with autism, autistic relatives, or more knowledge of psychology has read it and what they thought.

Warnings: The history of autism is rife with abuse, dehumanization, weak and misguided science and medicine, misdiagnosis, misogyny, homophobia, antisemitism, forced sterilization, eugenics, psychiatric hospitals, shock therapy, forced medication, apathy, poverty, and generally bigoted and neurotypical thinking. Furthermore, because Hans Asperger was working in Austria during the rise of the Nazis, there is discussion of Nazi policies and of decisions made within that political climate to keep one’s job and hopefully save one’s patients. There are also brief mentions of the Holocaust.

Also, there is reference throughout to autism being a disorder and a disability, as well as quotes from historical figures that reflect the biases and bigotry of their day and quotes from living people about how autism has “stolen their child” and the desire to “get my kid back.” Hopefully all of the above is to be expected given the subject matter, but you never know.

9/10 ( )
  NinjaMuse | Jul 26, 2020 |
A (long!) look at the history of what we now call 'autism spectrum disorder.' A lot of it is grim (I read about 20% of the book very, very quickly with my eyes nearly squinched shut because it was so painful), some of it is hopeful, and I'm very glad to see the whole "story so far" presented all together in one place. ( )
  being_b | Jan 8, 2020 |
History of autism diagnosis, research, treatment of kids and their families. Exploring growing movement of valuing neurodiversity ( )
  AccyP | Nov 11, 2019 |
A strikingly compassionate and considered history of autism. Long as it was, there is a lot this book left unexplored: namely around how different cultures might have considered this neurosocial profile. Also a limited discussion of how differently African American, immigrant, or low income autistic kids and adults are seen and treated than kids and adults with access to money and resources. Still, went into incredible depth, slowly building a picture of how, with adequate resources and peer support, and a strengths-based focus, we can have a world more welcoming to autistic people and their families.
  Latkes | Jul 16, 2019 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 45 (següent | mostra-les totes)
(Actually an excerpt from the book, not a review.)

By autistic standards, the “normal” brain is easily distractible, is obsessively social, and suffers from a deficit of attention to detail and routine. Thus people on the spectrum experience the neurotypical world as relentlessly unpredictable and chaotic, perpetually turned up too loud and full of people who have little respect for personal space.
afegit per elenchus | editaslate.com, Steve Silberman (Sep 23, 2015)
 

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Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Steve Silbermanautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Sacks, OliverPròlegautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Cavanaugh, MeighanDissenyadorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Ho, AndreaDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hughes, WilliamNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Weaver, MarkAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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BY OLIVER SACKS
I first met Steve Silberman in 2001. He was a young journalist then, assigned to do a profile of me before the publication of my memoir Uncle Tungsten.
Introduction:
Beyond the Geek Syndrome
 
There is more than one way to do it.
-- Larry Wall
 
On a bright May morning in 2000, I was standing on the deck of a ship churning toward Alaska's Inside Passage with more than a hundred computer programmers.
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"A groundbreaking book that upends conventional thinking about autism and suggests a broader model for acceptance, understanding, and full participation in society for people who think differently. What is autism: a devastating developmental disorder, a lifelong disability, or a naturally occurring form of cognitive difference akin to certain forms of genius? In truth, it is all of these things and more--and the future of our society depends on our understanding it. WIRED reporter Steve Silberman unearths the secret history of autism, long suppressed by the same clinicians who became famous for discovering it, and finds surprising answers to the crucial question of why the number of diagnoses has soared in recent years. Going back to the earliest days of autism research and chronicling the brave and lonely journey of autistic people and their families through the decades, Silberman provides long-sought solutions to the autism puzzle, while mapping out a path for our society toward a more humane world in which people with learning differences and those who love them have access to the resources they need to live happier, healthier, more secure, and more meaningful lives. Along the way, he reveals the untold story of Hans Asperger, the father of Asperger's syndrome, whose "little professors" were targeted by the darkest social-engineering experiment in human history; exposes the covert campaign by child psychiatrist Leo Kanner to suppress knowledge of the autism spectrum for fifty years; and casts light on the growing movement of "neurodiversity" activists seeking respect, support, technological innovation, accommodations in the workplace and in education, and the right to self-determination for those with cognitive differences"-- "A groundbreaking book that upends conventional thinking about autism and suggests a broader model for acceptance, understanding, and full participation in society for people who think differently"--

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