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The Fortnight in September: A Novel de R.C.…
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The Fortnight in September: A Novel (1931 original; edició 2021)

de R.C. Sherriff (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
2621279,812 (4.01)70
A suburban family are on their annual fortnight's holiday at Bognor: man and wife, a grown-up daughter working for a dressmaker, a son just started in a London office, and a younger boy still at school. This book presents a day-by-day account of their holiday from their last evening at home until the day they packed their bags for their return.… (més)
Membre:Suziff
Títol:The Fortnight in September: A Novel
Autors:R.C. Sherriff (Autor)
Informació:Scribner (2021), 304 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:to-read

Detalls de l'obra

The Fortnight in September de R. C. Sherriff (1931)

  1. 20
    Greengates de R. C. Sherriff (nessreader)
    nessreader: Usually i don't cross-recommend same-author books but rc sherriff does so many genres that i make an exception. These 2 share a warmth and compassion for unglamorous decent people living everyday lives.
  2. 10
    London Belongs to Me de Norman Collins (wandering_star)
    wandering_star: Like The Fortnight In September, London Belongs To Me looks closely and sympathetically at what may seem, from the outside, to be ordinary mundane lives. In my opinion, London Belongs To Me does it better...
  3. 10
    Clothes-Pegs de Susan Scarlett (nessreader)
    nessreader: Both are about heroic families on the border of poverty just after the 2nd world war. Both families are mutually supportive, making the best of what they have and hopeful of the future. I'm not sure that the writers are not condescending and writing-down-to their characters -that may be my cynicism - but was interested that both books give multiple povs within the group so that shades of different agendas emerge.… (més)
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Es mostren 1-5 de 12 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Another Persephone title, and much in the same style as others I've read. Having read about 8 now, I'm seeing that they tend to publish quiet, family-centered novels that often have drama simmering quietly under the surface.

This novel is about a middle class family who vacations to the British seaside town of Bognor every September. This year feels a little different because the children are older - the oldest two basically adults - and things seem to be shifting. They all realize that the boarding house they always stay in is looking more and more run down. We get a glimpse into each family member's internal thoughts; this isn't the sort of family that would share these thoughts out loud.

I liked this quiet book. But at the same time, I was waiting all the way through for things to come to a head or for some real conversations to happen and they didn't. I suppose that is true to life, but it didn't make for a particularly interesting book. Still, at this time of year, with all the bustle of the holidays, I enjoy a quiet book. This fit the bill. ( )
  japaul22 | Dec 30, 2020 |
Humdrum plotting, modest story: family goes to the seaside. There are interesting touches, revealing of domestic life in the 30s, and one does appreciate the spirit of joyful unrestrained freedom (p108) - away from the regular class distinctions and the tediums of work and daily cares. But the characterisation is unexceptional, rather humdrum too. The father, the main focus, is dutiful and a touch solemn, ready to disapprove. And indeed, alongside the satisfactions of orderliness, and knowing one’s place, generally endorsed in the book, come, all too often, the pursed lips of restraint or disapproval. There are a few snatched moments of thrill, but mainly it’s continuity and familiarity in the story. No big drama, few surprises, more or less how this family likes its holidays to proceed. ( )
  eglinton | Nov 21, 2020 |
A few days ago, The Guardian published an article in which authors recommended uplifting books to brighten our spirits. Kazuo Ishiguro’s choice was The Fortnight in September (1931), about a London family’s annual holiday at the seaside in Bognor Regis. I bought it there and then, and have been happily absorbed in it ever since. It’s hard to describe exactly why it’s so absorbing, because very little happens – it’s a simple little book, but simplicity is a large part of its appeal. It takes you back to a less complicated age, when you had one holiday a year, and all excitement, hope and expectation centred on those two weeks at the sea. You probably went to the same place every year, and there were boarding houses and sandcastles; strolls along the promenades; mornings swimming in the sea; bathing huts; arcade games; the band playing on the pier. It conjures up the golden age of the British seaside town, and the sheer pleasure of being on holiday and getting away from it all. So roll up your trouser-legs, grab your bucket and spade and join me for a heartwarming piece of escapism...

For the full review, please see my blog:
https://theidlewoman.net/2020/04/08/the-fortnight-in-september-r-c-sherriff/ ( )
  TheIdleWoman | Apr 8, 2020 |
The Fortnight in September tells the story of the Stevens' family's annual summer holiday in Bognor Regis around 1930, probably the heyday of the traditional British seaside holiday. Mr and Mrs Stevens have been going to the same guesthouse in Bognor Regis for two weeks in September every year since their marriage, but what seems an unchanging ritual is on the brink of ending, as their two grown-up children talk of spending their holidays with friends. The Stevens are a very ordinary and quiet family, there are no dramas and very little happens, but the book is a satisfying read none the less.

What R.C.Sherriff does beautifully is to capture to perfection the whole idea of a holiday:

'The man on his holidays becomes the man he might have been, the man he could have been, had things worked out differently. All men are equal on their holidays: all are free to dream their castles without thought of expense, or skill of architect.'

And what he also captured beautifully were the worries and disappointments lurking underneath the surface of even a seemingly idyllic holiday: Mr Stevens brooding on his disappointments at work; Mrs Stevens hiding the fact that she found the sea terrifying and would actually prefer to be at home; and Dick's unhappiness in the job that his father is so proud of having found for him. Only the youngest child, Ernie, is untouched by the worries of the adult world. And even the guesthouse in which they stay, 'Seaview', has grown old along with its landlady, so that not even the rose-tinted glasses with which it is viewed by the Stevens can hide its gradual decline into dilapidation.

What is also lovely in this book is the period detail of the holidays of that era, something which particularly interests me having grown up in an old holiday resort myself. I was amazed that Mrs Stevens was expected to shop every day for the groceries that were cooked by their landlady. And I found even the little details of their journey fascinating. So overall a good read. ( )
2 vota SandDune | Sep 4, 2013 |
The Fortnight in September is a story about "about simple, uncomplicated people doing normal things." as the author himself described it in his autobiography. We follow the Stevens family on their annual fortnight's holiday to Bognor Regis in the 1930s. This fortnight in Bognor is an annual ritual, starting with the evening before going away, the journey to Bognor by train, their stay in the same house in Bognor every year and even including the amount of food and drink they buy which has been calculated to a nicety based on how much they required in previous years.

There are some changes this year, however. The two eldest children, Mary and Dick, now have jobs and income of their own and have contributed some of their money towards the cost of the holiday meaning the Stevens can rent one of the large beach huts to change in and sit on the veranda when on the beach. The lady who runs Seaview, the house they always stay in, is getting rather elderly and struggling to cope and the Stevens start to notice how run down Seaview is becoming. There's a sense that this may be the last family holiday they have all together at this house so there is a sense of impending change throughout the book and also a sense of nostalgia towards the many years they've enjoyed this holiday together. But there's also a sense of hope as Dick Stevens thinks about his future career and what he wants to do with his life, Mary Stevens falls in love for the first time and even Mr Stevens is able to come to terms with some past disappointments.

"The man on his holidays becomes the man he might have been, the man he could have been, had things worked out a little differently. All men are equal on their holidays: all are free to dream their castles without thought of expense, or skill of architect. Dreams based upon such delicate fabric must be nursed with reverence and held away from the crude light of tomorrow week."

There are some wonderful moments of quiet humour, such as Mr Stevens reaction to the holiday photos when developed, or the description of the large, soulless holiday house one of Mr Stevens' clients has had built for him and his wife which they had wanted to be a seaside house despite the fact that 'the sound of the sea got on Mrs. Montgomery's nerves'.

The story ends as the Stevens say goodbye to Bognor and Seaview at the end of their fortnight there and I was very sorry to leave them. This isn't the sort of story where much happens but it is a wonderful observation of the hopes and dreams of ordinary people. Recommended. ( )
4 vota souloftherose | Oct 8, 2012 |
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Mr Stevens and his children loved the sea in all its moods: they loved it when it lay quietly at its ebb, murmuring in its sleep -- and when it awoke, and came rippling over the sands: at its full on a peaceful evening, lazily slapping at the shingle. But best of all they loved it as it was today -- roaring wildly round the groins, booming and sighing in the cavernous places beneath the pier, crashing against the sea wall and showering them with spray. Every one of its thousand calls had a different note -- every sound was wild with freedom. Wave after wave lashed the concrete wall, to sink back with a moan of pain as though clutched and drawn down by a great sea monster. The countless little pebbles lay motionless, petrified as each wave came crashing on them -- then they would leap to life and go madly chasing it with a sound like the far distant cheering of a mighty crowd.
The man on his holidays becomes the man he might have been, the man he could have been, had things worked out a little differently. All men are equal on their holidays: all are free to dream their castles without thought of expense, or skill of architect. Dreams based upon such delicate fabric must be nursed with reverence and held away from the crude light of tomorrow week.
But they saw in front of them a woman neither fat nor thin: a faded woman with yellow hair, bright red lips and rosy cheek bones. She looked as if she had been boiled in too much water, then artificially flavoured.
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A suburban family are on their annual fortnight's holiday at Bognor: man and wife, a grown-up daughter working for a dressmaker, a son just started in a London office, and a younger boy still at school. This book presents a day-by-day account of their holiday from their last evening at home until the day they packed their bags for their return.

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