IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Native American Fiction: A User's Manual (2006)

de David Treuer

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
471430,883 (4)2
An entirely new approach to reading, understanding, and enjoying Native American fiction This book has been written with the narrow conviction that if Native American literature is worth thinking about at all, it is worth thinking about as literature. The vast majority of thought that has been poured out onto Native American literature has puddled, for the most part, on how the texts are positioned in relation to history or culture. Rather than create a comprehensive cultural and historical genealogy for Native American literature, David Treuer investigates a selection of the most important Native American novels and, with a novelist's eye and a critic's mind, examines the intricate process of understanding literature on its own terms. Native American Fiction: A User's Manualis speculative, witty, engaging, and written for the inquisitive reader. These essays--on Sherman Alexie, Forrest Carter, James Fenimore Cooper, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, and James Welch--are rallying cries for the need to read literature as literature and, ultimately, reassert the importance and primacy of the word.… (més)
No n'hi ha cap
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 2 mencions

I began reading this group of essays first back in June, finished them in October after reading most of the novels it references, and then I read the whole book again over the last weekend. This is a complicated and open-ended and exploratory book and I recommend you read it because what I got from it might be completely different from what you get from it...in the tradition, I suppose, of all deep reading.

"Native American Fiction: A User's Manual" is a remarkable work for the way it isolates, through deep reading of a handful of novels, how contemporary Native American novels reflect and refract the heritage of colonialism, the heritage of genocide, the heritage of mystic nostalgia-building about Native American life...and the heritage of past writings about Native Americans, from colonialists and Native Americans alike. The book is among other things a close examination of the idea of "authenticity" in Native American works. The book tries to define what 'authenticity' really means, not by what critics and/or authors say, but from inside the text, from what can be gleaned from the novels themselves.

Treuer argues that writing that evokes 'authenticity,' when examined at a text-level, has less to do with getting back to a pure and pre-colonial storytelling tradition, and more to do with writing sentences that mimic 17th-19th century white authors, like Cooper and Grinnell and Longfellow. He posits that the language of the colonizer mimics to the language of "authentic" voices, and vice versa, to the point where however great a contemporary Native American novel is, it can't be distinguished at a textual level from a novel written by a non-Native-American.

Treuer carries this argument to the last possible iterative conclusion near the end of the book when he compares at a textual level the work of Sherman Alexie, champion of the idea of authenticity as an important bedrock of Native American fiction, with the work of racist charlatan Asa Earl Carter, author of the sham autobiography "Education of Little Tree." Treuer finds little to differentiate the works of these two authors that can be found within the works themselves. This is a bit mind-blowing and that is why it's important to read the whole book...there's a reason why this essay is near the end of a very carefully laid-out argument.

There is so much here to make you feel either aghast or enlightened or both at once because Treuer really does blow up a lot of cherished beliefs in his quest for absolute honesty--his desire to clear the mist and romance away from our collective idea of Indian-ness. Treuer is a huge fan of Erdrich and Welch and Silko but he is also happy to point out that Erdrich's work--how her novels work--has more in common with Proust and Faulkner than with 'authenticity..' and that Welch's elevated dialogue is influenced by Cooper, and that Welch uses techniques that hearken all the way back to Homer...and Silko's mythologies are not 'authentic' but are instead made anew to suit her fictional purpose...All the while he is asserting these authors mastery and genius. This is not a take-down. It's a build-up.

So in the end when Treuer states "There is no such thing as Native American Fiction," what he is saying is, I believe, that we readers need to pull back the easy assertions of 'authenticity' and to read with fresh eyes and without expectation that we know what the term 'Native American fiction' really means. Because 'authenticity' is only, Treuer seems to say, an obscurity of what is really going on in these novels. To claim 'authenticity' is in a way to diminish their novel-ness, their nouvelle-ness, their innovative greatness.

One of my favorite passages of this book is a close read of an Objibwe poem and its English translations. Within that fragment of original, 'authentic' literature is such a pure beauty, even if the fragment was meant as a children's rhyme. Treuer doesn't quite say that the only true authentic Native American literature is limited to pre-colonial periods, or to works written originally in Native American languages. But he allows for what has been lost.

A fascinating read, with its core thesis challenged in interesting ways by the author himself on every page, in a way that allows the reader to spin and speculate about literature in wonderful ways. It is in the end a book for readers, giving us new ways to approach and appreciate these novels as readers.

Old review:

More a journey than a thesis, Treuer's Native American Fiction: A User's Manual gave me, as a reader, new perspectives, rather than hard conclusions. Treuer posits motivations of fellow Native American authors and why they write what they do; these are always interesting. He also shares his assumptions about what (mostly white) readers bring to a novel written by a Native American. His suppositions are made declaratively, not self-reflectively. I loved his certainty. I loved his opinions. I re-thought my own reading experiences of the novels he writes about and came to new understandings of these. I was mostly persuaded. And I enjoyed spending time with Treuer, as he explored a topic that he has thought about deeply. This is the best kind of literary criticism--a kind that opens both worlds and words to new interpretations. ( )
  poingu | Feb 22, 2020 |
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

An entirely new approach to reading, understanding, and enjoying Native American fiction This book has been written with the narrow conviction that if Native American literature is worth thinking about at all, it is worth thinking about as literature. The vast majority of thought that has been poured out onto Native American literature has puddled, for the most part, on how the texts are positioned in relation to history or culture. Rather than create a comprehensive cultural and historical genealogy for Native American literature, David Treuer investigates a selection of the most important Native American novels and, with a novelist's eye and a critic's mind, examines the intricate process of understanding literature on its own terms. Native American Fiction: A User's Manualis speculative, witty, engaging, and written for the inquisitive reader. These essays--on Sherman Alexie, Forrest Carter, James Fenimore Cooper, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, and James Welch--are rallying cries for the need to read literature as literature and, ultimately, reassert the importance and primacy of the word.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3
3.5
4 1
4.5
5 2

GenreThing

Sense gènere

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 160,254,882 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible