IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

The Closing of the American Mind de Allan…
S'està carregant…

The Closing of the American Mind (1987 original; edició 1987)

de Allan Bloom (Autor), Saul Bellow (Pròleg)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
3,999282,522 (3.6)36
In this book, the author (a distinguished political philosopher) argues that the social/political crisis of 20th-century America is really an intellectual crisis marked by obvious declines in appreciation of humanities, a drop in the qualitative output of our university systems, and a disquieting disconnect between today's students and the spiritual and cultural traditions of their heritage.… (més)
Membre:CaliforniaRoads
Títol:The Closing of the American Mind
Autors:Allan Bloom (Autor)
Altres autors:Saul Bellow (Pròleg)
Informació:Simon Schuster Trade (1987), 392 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

The Closing of the American Mind de Allan Bloom (1987)

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 36 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 27 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Utter rubbish. Did any of the predictions come true? His conclusions are already outdated. An old fart pining for the "good ol' days." A 19th century education is no longer relevant. The good old days were merely old not necessarily any better, and by definition half the people in the world are always going to be below average.

If Bloom had his way only the elite would ever be allowed to rule, something we see all too frequently is a disaster. ( )
  Gumbywan | Jun 24, 2022 |
I have waited years and years to read this. I knew there was good stuff in here, but now that I finally made time for it, I wasn't as excited to read about it now. Still, it was a provocative, intriguing, and historical read.

****
Published in the late 80s, Allan Bloom wrote a scathing and disappointing report about the decline of reason and rise of relativism in the American university system. He blamed the 1960s for the change. You think?

Bloom argued for a return to the Great Books in education, which help us to think about the ideas that matter: is there truth, freedom, and a God? -- something young people crave to know, but now never find out in higher learning because everything is relative.
****

A few final (truncated) quotes:

"A good program of liberal education feeds the student's love of truth and passion to live a good life."

"The only serious solution is the one that is universally rejected: the good old Great Books approach, in which liberal education means reading classic texts, letting them dictate what the questions are and the method of approaching them,...trying to read them as their authors wished them to be read." ( )
  GRLopez | Oct 23, 2021 |
Quite an interesting look into the state of the university in the late 1980's. According to Al Mohler, if these things were true then, how much more so now!

Here in his book the late Alan Bloom, a professor at an elite American university, offers a penetrating look into the status of higher education systems. The institutions and universities have become little more than an inculcation of values such as openness and tolerance. It is a unique work to have such a lengthy stay atop the NYT bestseller list, yet I presume many today would find Bloom obtuse; he calls out the cultural mantras of openness, tolerance, and relativism as impoverishing the souls of today's students.

Bloom's analysis is undoubtedly insightful and provocative, but sometimes challenging to understand. He regularly critiques and cites from philosophers such as Rousseau, Montesquieu, Hobbes, and Locke, and little familiarity with these characters can make his points hard to grasp. Many chapters were difficult to follow, not because he is unclear, but because he is drawing from such a deep well of philosophical knowledge. Even despite these shortcomings in the reader, those involved at any level of education would benefit from a handful of selections from his work, such as the brief section on books. He says, "our students have lost the practice of and the taste for reading. They have not learned how to read, nor do they have the expectation of delight or improvement from reading" (63). He goes on to cite how pop psychology is now the sole informant of what people are like and their range of motives (64). Furthermore, he states, "lack of education simply results in students' seeking for enlightenment wherever it is readily available, without being able to distinguish between the sublime and trash, insight and propaganda" (64). In an information age that has only accelerated exponentially since Bloom's title released, this truth is even more evident. With information whizzing about whenever and wherever we want it, discernment and knowledge is hardly distinguishable from the soiled refuse that so often passes for knowledge today.

From a theological vantage point, though the decline of the book in university is lamentable, the book of all books is Scripture. It stands as the norming norm. Convictions about this book led to the founding of the university in the first place and it is not a little ironic that the narrative is ever inching towards full circle. This book has long since fell out of favor in the major institutions. Furthermore, the university, which began out of convictions about one book, have gradually lost their influence in directing students toward enjoyment and enlightenment from books in general.

Though much more could be said, Christians realize that the primary location for education begins in the home (Deut. 6, 9). Christian parents cannot neglect this responsibility and settle for passing on social cues and merely what is acceptable societal behavior. Many ideas of significant consequence are being passed out like hot cakes not only in the university but across all the cultural mediums today. The re-education of young people remains essential. Though the education systems are faltering, parents must not! One remedy can be found in taking hold of the book of books and allowing its words find a rich dwelling place deep down in the soul and a fruitful place of prominence in family discussion. Easier said than done, but conviction will endure in the long run.

I only read about halfway through, and as the prescriptive side waned in its helpfulness, I eventually put it down to move on to other things.
  joshcrouse3 | Sep 17, 2021 |
Case 14 shelf 4
  semoffat | Sep 1, 2021 |
I think the diversity of these reviews and comments is a testament to the quality of Bloom’s work. Something that, had the book been emphasizing a bunch of thoughtless relativism (as opposed to thoughtful relativism), would have garnered a whole bunch of flat and homogenous reviews. The book had a section on race, yes. It also had a section on gender, students, the university, the crises of philosophy, and several others, all of which were critical and none of which were central to Bloom’s argument. In fact, the sole object of Bloom’s criticism was ultimately the tattered state of modern thought and the mockery it makes of our collective reality, Life.

The point of this book isn’t to tell you or anyone else what to think. The point of this book is to make you think.

In all honesty, I did debate giving this book less than 5 stars due to Bloom’s section on race and the surprising attention it seems to elicit from readers. However, beyond the section being one of the shortest, nowhere within it does Bloom allude to or even insinuate racist sentiment. Most of the focus appears to be a misinterpretation of Bloom’s addressing the use and abuse of statistical data that, despite being completely devoid of any cultural sensitivity or insight, was used to uproot existing communities (no doubt underserved communities, but Bloom’s concern is the university) on the expectation of immediate cultural assimilation and absolute conformism. Something that, had there been any serious thought to actual human beings – the culture of the black communities – may have elicited more insightful and impactful outcomes (insofar as Bloom saw it).

The book makes a plea for the revitalization of philosophy and a renewed meaning of human nature. All of this is under the expectation that the author should be taken seriously, but not absolutely. ( )
  mitchanderson | Jan 17, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 27 (següent | mostra-les totes)
ALLAN BLOOM, a professor of philosophy and political science at the University of Chicago, is perhaps best known as a translator and interpreter of Jean Jacques Rousseau's ''Emile'' and Plato's ''Republic,'' two classic texts that ponder the relationship between education and society. In ''The Closing of the American Mind,'' Mr. Bloom has drawn both on his deep acquaintance with philosophical thinking about education and on a long career as a teacher to give us an extraordinary meditation on the fate of liberal education in this country - a meditation, as he puts it in his opening pages, ''on the state of our souls.''
afegit per stephmo | editaNew York Times, Roger Kimball (Apr 5, 1987)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Bloom, Allanautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Bellow, SaulPròlegautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
To my students
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
I used to think that young Americans began whatever education they were to get at the age of eighteen, that their early lives were spiritually empty and that they arrived at the university clean slates unaware of their deeper selves and the world beyond their superficial experience.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (1)

In this book, the author (a distinguished political philosopher) argues that the social/political crisis of 20th-century America is really an intellectual crisis marked by obvious declines in appreciation of humanities, a drop in the qualitative output of our university systems, and a disquieting disconnect between today's students and the spiritual and cultural traditions of their heritage.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.6)
0.5 2
1 17
1.5 4
2 27
2.5 12
3 77
3.5 16
4 128
4.5 16
5 69

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 176,931,904 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible