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A Generous Orthodoxy: Why I Am a Missional, Evangelical, Post/Protestant,… (2004)

de Brian D. McLaren

Sèrie: Emergent Ys Series (21)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,942296,924 (3.7)14
A confession and manifesto from a senior leader in the emerging church movement. A Generous Orthodoxy calls for a radical, Christ-centered orthodoxy of faith and practice in a missional, generous spirit. Brian McLaren argues for a post-liberal, post-conservative, post-protestant convergence, which will stimulate lively interest and global conversation among thoughtful Christians from all traditions.In a sweeping exploration of belief, author Brian McLaren takes us across the landscape of faith, envisioning an orthodoxy that aims for Jesus, is driven by love, and is defined by missional intent. A Generous Orthodoxy rediscovers the mysterious and compelling ways that Jesus can be embraced across the entire Christian horizon. Rather than establishing what is and is not "orthodox," McLaren walks through the many traditions of faith, bringing to the center a way of life that draws us closer to Christ and to each other. Whether you find yourself inside, outside, or somewhere on the fringe of Christianity, A Generous Orthodoxy draws you toward a way of living that looks beyond the "us/them" paradigm to the blessed and ancient paradox of "we."… (més)
  1. 10
    Becoming Conversant with the Emerging Church de D. A. Carson (soflbooks)
    soflbooks: Readers interested in the emergent movement will get a full-orbed perspective by reading these two books - McLaren its leading proponent, Carson a learned critic.
  2. 00
    A New Kind of Christianity: Ten Questions That Are Transforming the Faith de Brian D. McLaren (jstamp26)
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» Mira també 14 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 28 (següent | mostra-les totes)
The first time I read this book I wanted to be a Christian but I was afraid it would make me a bad person; now I’m re-reading it and I’m the core constituency nerd sharpening the axe. I can’t say exactly what did it. It wasn’t all Brian, obviously. Some of what he approves of (if Lesslie Newbingin weren’t so smart I’d say he watches television; maybe he watches German television) or wrote himself (I am an Essene, Brian. They’re the best Second Temple faction. Just accept it. Don’t make me use a Jedi mind trick on you) is just…. Whatever. But we already know how I sometimes feel about Richard Rohr (very annoying). He was one of the first for me, besides Emmet Fox. (Emmet is okay, but so reticent. So reticent to speak, and not always about the most important things.) Richard’s like, Don’t let those fools use the Jedi mind trick on you. This side of the coin isn’t real, and the other side of the coin isn’t real, but the side of the coin. The side of the coin is real. Just give it to me if both sides of the coin are a lie. *pulls back* This is my lunch! And that’s what I do, but especially the popular fawned-over version can be annoying to listen to. Television drama. And Jack, obviously the only reason I’m not pissed at Jack is what he came through, you know. He’s a bloody-minded man, whose father was a wandering Aramean who went into Egypt with few people. Considering that, Jack’s a great guy. He really is.

Anyway, second time through ‘Generous’ was good; letting go of angst of not having credentials. William Temple’s ok sometimes, Richard’s a priest (although he’s still just a priest and not a sort of Father Priest he is to people in their hearts), and so on. But scientists forget to laugh at Emmet because they think he’s a bad joke, Brian is a preacher without credentials, and Jack was a man without the right credentials in an age of specialists. A lot of people with credentials can’t do much of anything meaningful, and don’t want to.

Brian also said that the link between charismatics and contemplatives is joy, although they find it differently. I don’t listen to pop or vocal music unless I’m strapped down and it’s the radio—not I, myself. (I know that the transition I’m about to do would make a charismatic shiver in the depths of the Spirit; I’m sorry in advance.) I also don’t look at certain pictures anymore, maybe I’ll get around to reading Elle magazine or something and sometimes a crappy, crude story can be nice, as good stories are never really about the act itself. (I don’t see anything wrong with the hand itself, just certain…. well.) It doesn’t preoccupy me much, but occasionally life intrudes into my thoughts. (*Kant in the shower, cleansing himself from being outside the air conditioning*). I work at HomeGoods, though, where beautiful people shop, and it almost annoys me, not a strong annoyance like you get with Richard vs the Wandering Aramean, (although thinking about crackers can be annoying, one of these days I bet I’m not gonna even *think* what (even in a fair place) I couldn’t say, you know….), but a weak sort of displeasure that I’ve been noticing people again. I don’t want to get married. I don’t want anything but church, meetings, and books. So why notice people? Then Brian starts talking about noticing consumer objects (home goods, hahaha) or whatever, trees, birds, nature, without buying or owning any of it, but just feeling a joy. So there’s a sort of non-possessive noticing that can bring joy. That’s what I’ll have to practice.

[Aquinas: Animals aren’t just things because they’re living things, and humans aren’t just animals because they’re rational animals, but in a sense humans are animals and animals are things, since human is contained within animal and animal within thing. (paraphrase)]

I can’t let the fools monopolize *every* kind of optimism.

Schopenhauer: This life should never have been.
Obi-Wan Kenobi: The flowers are beautiful.
Schopenhauer: The flowers are beautiful.
Obi-Wan Kenobi: The Essenes are the best Second Temple faction.
Brian: *from another room* No they’re not!

…. But Brian’s right when he says that much of modern liberalism (for me: mostly the kind that says, We Don’t Talk About, XYZ, ABC, and LMN, and so on, because life is a waiting room. Run along and play. But remember: Hitler had a sense of purpose in this life!) is a sort of chemotherapy for the cancer of racism (etc) that could save a life, but which is extremely unnatural and destructive.

Brian: I thought you didn’t like me! I thought I made another enemy!

I’m just trying to remind myself that we’re two different people. I was social distancing.

…. Young Hitler: *mumbles* If I buy a bit less bread today, I’ll be hungry, yes; but I’ll be that much closer to going to the Vienna Opera House.
Robot Liberal: *grabs Hitler’s money and shoves him some bread* Go and play. Go and play. Ha ha ha. Ha ha ha.
Young Hitler: *bitterly takes up bread* Robots don’t know how to laugh.

Brian: Just keep including. It’s all human. It’s all human. Nothing human is alien to me. Jesus loves it all.
Space Alien: I feel excluded.
Brian: Oh my god. The things I have to put up with.

…. When we’ve been there ten thousand years, bright shining as the sun,
We’ll have no less days to sing God’s praise, orthodoxy’s just begun

Brian: *sleeping* Z, oooo
Brian’s Dog: *sleeping* Harumph, oooooo

Until next time, sweet prince.
  goosecap | Mar 22, 2022 |
To talk about someone clearly less important than Jesus, I’ve heard Christians before talk about Bob Dylan—‘serve somebody’—but it’s always, before, been in this very dishonest way. That is, they always make it sound like Dylan was trying to turn you into a Republican! I guess that’s all religion can be, right! But Brian McLaren makes it clear that it’s not Caesar that is Lord, not worldly authority, not national authority, yes, not *American* authority! Which is very true to the Dylan song he references, which says that all people must decide to “serve somebody”, *regardless of their class*. That *could* be a Republican message—at least I sure bloody *hope* it could be!—but it’s certainly not *exclusively* a Republican message.... not a registered trademark.

Anyway McLaren is a great guy; he’s very humble, which isn’t what you expect from religious people, or even intellectuals of any kind—or people in general, when you come right down to the ugly truth, right. McLaren is very conscious of the enormity of his task and the limitations of his resources, which makes him a lot easier to trust. I don’t know if I’m equally dependent upon the Lord, although my conscious mind in a moment of calm shudders at the imagined possibility that I might not be. I am far more confident of grace than I am of myself; people all work at something, whoever they are, but when you try to work for God, what you “get back” is always more of a gift than anything else, since there’s no.... having control, I guess, or anything like that.

But I drift. McLaren’s a great guy. There’s a reason why people go to him for book reviews/blurbs. He’s like Papa Haydn for his own little subculture.
  smallself | Dec 29, 2019 |
In this classic of the Emergent Church pantheon, Brian McLaren presents his famous analysis of the Seven figures of Jesus which he has known: Conservative/Protestant, Pentecostal/Charismatic, Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Liberal Protestant, Anabaptist, and Jesus of the Oppressed.

With two Forewords, one by Phyllis Tickle, and one by John Franke. No Index. ( )
  keylawk | Dec 6, 2019 |
(need to update book details when returned by borrower)
  ShelbourneStChurch | Nov 24, 2019 |
I resisted reading this for a while as it looked rather 'heavy'...but having read McLaren's pseudo-fiction trilogy, I was interested enough to try it. Well worth reading, in my view. It starts with an overview of the author's journey in faith, from flannelgraph pictures at Sunday School through teenage doubts, the 'Jesus movement', through different views of Jesus, beginning with the Conservative Evangelical one, and moving outward, to embrace more and more viewpoints, before considering the idea of a 'generous' orthodoxy, open to all, encompassing much.

After outlining his impressions and experiences with different flavours of Christianity, McLaren then outlines why he considers himself to be missional, Biblical, Contemplative, and so on, including his understanding of more controversial terms such as Calvinist, Charismatic, and even Liberal/Conservative. It's all good stuff, based on solid Biblical foundations, infused with the wisdom of tradition and a great deal of rational thinking. Wisely, he does not touch on current 'issues' over which the church is sadly divided, but emphasises instead the message of Jesus, and the importance of demonstrating God's love to the world, seeing the Kingdom of Heaven as now, rather than simply trying to focus on eternity as so many seem to.

There's a lot of wisdom in this book, and a great deal to think about. Definitely recommended, particularly for those who have already written off McLaren due to his sometimes controversial actions (albeit based on love).
( )
  SueinCyprus | Jan 26, 2016 |
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A confession and manifesto from a senior leader in the emerging church movement. A Generous Orthodoxy calls for a radical, Christ-centered orthodoxy of faith and practice in a missional, generous spirit. Brian McLaren argues for a post-liberal, post-conservative, post-protestant convergence, which will stimulate lively interest and global conversation among thoughtful Christians from all traditions.In a sweeping exploration of belief, author Brian McLaren takes us across the landscape of faith, envisioning an orthodoxy that aims for Jesus, is driven by love, and is defined by missional intent. A Generous Orthodoxy rediscovers the mysterious and compelling ways that Jesus can be embraced across the entire Christian horizon. Rather than establishing what is and is not "orthodox," McLaren walks through the many traditions of faith, bringing to the center a way of life that draws us closer to Christ and to each other. Whether you find yourself inside, outside, or somewhere on the fringe of Christianity, A Generous Orthodoxy draws you toward a way of living that looks beyond the "us/them" paradigm to the blessed and ancient paradox of "we."

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