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Peak: Secrets from the New Science of…
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Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise (2016 original; edició 2017)

de Anders Ericsson (Autor), Robert Pool (Autor)

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499636,315 (4.07)No n'hi ha cap
Mozart wasn't born with perfect pitch. Most athletes are not born with any natural advantage. Three world-class chess players were sisters, whose success was planned by their parents before they were even born. Anders Ericsson has spent thirty years studying The Special Ones, the geniuses, sports stars and musical prodigies. And his remarkable finding, revealed in Peak, is that their special abilities are acquired through training. The innate 'gift' of talent is a myth. Exceptional individuals are born with just one unique ability, shared by us all - the ability to develop our brains and bodies through our own efforts. Anders Ericsson's research was the inspiration for the popular '10,000-hour rule' but, he tells us, this rule is only the beginning of the story. It's not just the hours that are important but how you use them. We all have the seeds of excellence within us - it's merely a question of how to make them grow. With a bit of guidance, you'll be amazed at what the average person can achieve. The astonishing stories in Peak prove that potential is what you make it.… (més)
Membre:krguidry
Títol:Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise
Autors:Anders Ericsson (Autor)
Altres autors:Robert Pool (Autor)
Informació:Eamon Dolan/Mariner Books (2017), Edition: Reprint, 336 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise de Anders Ericsson (2016)

  1. 00
    The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance de David Epstein (caimanjosh)
    caimanjosh: Both deal with the science behind expert performance...Sports Gene is more focused on athletic performance, but Peak provides more detail on just what "deliberate practice" actually entails. Both are worth a read.
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An interesting look at how the world's most exceptional people got that way, and the lessons the rest of us can learn from it. Ericsson is the academic whose research formed the basis of Malcolm Gladwell's famous "10,000 hours" rule; Ericsson criticizes Gladwell for misunderstanding and misrepresenting his research and seems to have written this book in part as a response. (If the popularizers are getting my stuff wrong, then I'll just hire a co-author and popularize it myself!)

From studying people becoming great at things consequential (classical music) and not (memorizing long lists of numbers), Ericsson identifies a few key factors necessary for success: true growth comes from practicing at a level that pushes boundaries, with expert guidance from teachers familiar with good habits, all in the interests of developing "mental representations" of success (everything from exactly what one's body should do in an athletic competition to what a particular position on a chess board means) that encode this vital information in durable, accessible long-term memory.

Ericsson doesn't get into a few angles I would be curious to learn more of: how happy, successful and adjusted his single-subject experts are when not doing their specialty, and exactly how efficient his "deliberate practice" techniques are. That is, even if every all-time great got so through diligent application of a particular method, that doesn't mean that everyone who diligently applies that particular method will become an all-time great. Spending 10,000 hours may be worth it to become a world-class violinist, but is it worth sacrificing an entire childhood just to become a pretty good violinist?

More significantly, I wish Ericsson had focused less on experts and more on how ordinary people can use his talents to become better (but not necessarily the best) at matters of everyday life. He devotes one chapter, and bits of others, to this question, but perpetually returns to the question of how to become world-class. Since very few of us are going to devote our entire lives to becoming experts in one particular area, I'd have found a book that segued from what we can learn from experts in Part 1 to how the rest of us can apply that in our own lives in Part 2 to be more interesting.

If there is one overwhelming takeaway from the book about how to become a world-class expert, I'd say it's this: pick an immature field for your expertise. Mature fields like classical music or chess will require far more investment of time and practice to be better than everyone else, simply because so many other people are already putting in those huge investments. But you could become the best in the world at something less developed by devoting a few thousand or even a few hundred hours, rather than 10,000 or 20,000. ( )
  dhmontgomery | Dec 13, 2020 |
Most of the book is just filler telling you what experiments were done, what was achieved and found.

This guy goes on and on about deliberate and purposeful practice and mental representation.

Would have given 4 stars but he insulted Malcolm Gladwell purposely so minus another star. ( )
  Wendy_Wang | Sep 28, 2019 |
Read this book on a whim. Not too much to say here, a pretty good treatment of the ideas of deliberate practice. Which makes sense because that's kind of the author's big thing. Not gonna cover it here, you can read Wikipedia on your own. I like that he presents the quality of practice as a sort of continuum. The takeaway being that you can basically always be practicing better, so... maybe try thinking about it?

Things I thought about:
- what are things I am doing that I would like to attempt to deliberately practice? what are things that I don't want to deliberately practice?
- how would I go about practicing better? ( )
  haagen_daz | Jun 6, 2019 |
Most of the book is just filler telling you what experiments were done, what was achieved and found.

This guy goes on and on about deliberate and purposeful practice and mental representation.

Would have given 4 stars but he insulted Malcolm Gladwell purposely so minus another star. ( )
  Jason.Ong.Wicky | Oct 9, 2018 |
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Anders Ericssonautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Pool, Robertautor principaltotes les edicionsconfirmat
Pool, RobertAutorautor principaltotes les edicionsconfirmat
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Wikipedia en anglès (1)

Mozart wasn't born with perfect pitch. Most athletes are not born with any natural advantage. Three world-class chess players were sisters, whose success was planned by their parents before they were even born. Anders Ericsson has spent thirty years studying The Special Ones, the geniuses, sports stars and musical prodigies. And his remarkable finding, revealed in Peak, is that their special abilities are acquired through training. The innate 'gift' of talent is a myth. Exceptional individuals are born with just one unique ability, shared by us all - the ability to develop our brains and bodies through our own efforts. Anders Ericsson's research was the inspiration for the popular '10,000-hour rule' but, he tells us, this rule is only the beginning of the story. It's not just the hours that are important but how you use them. We all have the seeds of excellence within us - it's merely a question of how to make them grow. With a bit of guidance, you'll be amazed at what the average person can achieve. The astonishing stories in Peak prove that potential is what you make it.

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