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Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's…
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Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's Journey from Pakistani Muslim to… (edició 2017)

de Sabeeha Rehman (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
604338,729 (4.38)7
"This enthralling story of the making of an American is also a timely meditation on religion and culture. Threading My Prayer Rug is a richly textured reflection on what it is to be a Muslim in America today. It is also the luminous story of many journeys: from Pakistan to the United States in an arranged marriage that becomes a love match lasting forty years; from secular Muslim in an Islamic society to devout Muslim in a society ignorant of Islam, and from liberal to conservative to American Muslim; from master's candidate to bride and mother; and from an immigrant intending to stay two years to an American citizen, business executive, grandmother, and tireless advocate for interfaith understanding. Beginning with a sweetly funny, moving account of her arranged marriage, the author undercuts stereotypes and offers the refreshing view of an American life through Muslim eyes. In chapters leavened with humor, hope, and insight, she recounts an immigrant's daily struggles balancing assimilation with preserving heritage, overcoming religious barriers from within and distortions of Islam from without, and confronting issues of raising her children as Muslims--while they lobby for a Christmas tree! Sabeeha Rehman was doing interfaith work for Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, the driving force behind the Muslim community center at Ground Zero, when the backlash began. She discusses what that experience revealed about American society"--… (més)
Membre:lj57
Títol:Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's Journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim
Autors:Sabeeha Rehman (Autor)
Informació:Arcade (2017), Edition: 1st, 360 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:adult non-fiction, june 2019, 2019, aoc, ebook, tandem

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Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's Journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim de Sabeeha Rehman

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Es mostren totes 4
A wonderful addition to the 2019 UMW Reading Program. Easy to read and understand. This author tells of her life as a Muslim in Pakistan,and then in the United States. The book helps the reader understand what a Muslim in the United States goes through because of prejudice and stereotypes. ( )
  CucamongaMethodist | Jul 29, 2019 |
Interesting story but format kills it. With the recent end of Ramadan and now the end of Immigrant Heritage Month I thought this would be a good pickup. The author also recently wrote up a piece in 'The Wall Street Journal' (which appears to have been adapted from the book) so that spurred me on to finally knock this off my reading list. 
 
Author Rehman is a Pakistani who arrived in the United States after her arranged marriage. She navigates the culture, the language, the norms and culture how and walks the reader though her journey to how she came to be the person writing this book. Meeting her husband, the actual marriage, moving to New York, raising their two sons and learning to fit in a place where there were few people like them to the modern day including 9/11, her changes in politics and how life events eventually took her and her husband to Saudi Arabia and then back to the US. 
 
Initially it was interesting to read how her arranged marriage was well, arranged. I know Muslims who had similar experiences (although not quite as "arranged" by the parents in the sense they had more freedom to chat/email/phone/see the candidate in person before deciding). After awhile it dragged a bit, though and I didn't need to know ALL of the details of the courtship and customs
 
At first I thought it was me being familiar with the concept already but that permeated throughout the book. Her story was interesting but sometimes we'd get into the real nitty gritty of say what it was like for her to return to say, for example, fasting for Ramadan after years of not doing so or educating her two sons about Islam and the Quran, etc. The author tends to shift time periods of her past to the "present" day and that somewhat frustrated me. I would have preferred a more linear approach.
 
Still, overall I thought it was interesting. Books that are overly heavy on religion or have religion as a major topic can be a tossup for me. This was an enjoyable read but at the same time it was best I borrowed it from the library and that WSJ piece might have been enough if I couldn't access this book. But if you really want to read it, it's not terrible and for the right person it might be a great read. ( )
  HoldMyBook | Feb 11, 2018 |
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this remarkable memoir of a Pakistani Muslim lady and her family evolving into an American-Pakistani Muslim. I suspect all religious minorities in the US can relate to quite a few of her challenges.

Khalid Rehman is doing his residency in New York when his family and Sabeeha’s family negotiate an arranged marriage for them. They are married in Pakistan and then take off to the US to start their life together. Sabeeha is immediately confronted with culture shock. She soon realizes that it will be a challenge to fit into her new home while also maintaining her deep faith as a Muslim. And the challenges increase as their two sons grow into the American culture.

Sabeeha tells us of the reactions of American non-Muslims when there has been a terrorist attack involving a Muslim, and of the reaction of the American Muslim community. She also tells of the compassionate non-Muslim Americans who stood beside them through turbulent times. She became an advocate for interfaith relations.

But to me, the most interesting part comes toward the end of the book when she focuses on how culture influences the religion, and how a unique Muslim American is developing – an entity that holds true to its faith while absorbing traits of the country they now live in and love.

Back when Sabeeha met Khalid she agreed to come to the US for only two years. They have now been married for over 40 years and have been in the US most of that time – and have become American citizens. ( )
  BettyTaylor56 | Feb 10, 2018 |
A valuable and informative account of a woman’s religious journey from Pakistan where she was raised, to New York where she came as a young bride and gradually became involved in the creation of a moderate American Muslim community.

Sabeeha Rehman was born and raised in Pakistan. Although her parents were rather liberal, all those around her took the Muslim faith for granted. Her world was immersed in Islam. After an arranged and very happy marriage to a young doctor, she came to New York in 1971. Other Muslims seemed invisible. As her two sons grew, she wanted to ensure they were grounded in Islam. Her first step was to find and create a Muslim community to celebrate the faith and teach the children. She and her husband began a Sunday school and later a Mosque. After her experience of the Haji, a trip to Mecca, her faith deepened. Rehman became a leader in the group as they worked through what was essential to Muslims as a minority religion in America and what should be discarded or reshaped, such as the attitudes toward women. She also became deeply involved with Christians, Jews, and Hindus who shared her hopes for a pluralistic nation.

As a woman who has known Islam in both Pakistan and New York, Rehman is able to write knowledgeably about its basic practices and local differences. She provides readers with some of the texture of living as a Muslim woman and offers valuable examples about the practical aspects of how Muslims pray and celebrate. She describes how traditional arranged marriages are giving way to practices that give young people more chances to meet other Muslims and still prioritize the existing families. She discusses differences among Muslims and the Islamophobia in the United States in recent years as well as her growing role in interfaith work.

I enthusiastically recommend Threading my Prayer Rug as a fine introduction to what it means to share our country and our world with Muslims. ( )
  mdbrady | May 18, 2016 |
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"This enthralling story of the making of an American is also a timely meditation on religion and culture. Threading My Prayer Rug is a richly textured reflection on what it is to be a Muslim in America today. It is also the luminous story of many journeys: from Pakistan to the United States in an arranged marriage that becomes a love match lasting forty years; from secular Muslim in an Islamic society to devout Muslim in a society ignorant of Islam, and from liberal to conservative to American Muslim; from master's candidate to bride and mother; and from an immigrant intending to stay two years to an American citizen, business executive, grandmother, and tireless advocate for interfaith understanding. Beginning with a sweetly funny, moving account of her arranged marriage, the author undercuts stereotypes and offers the refreshing view of an American life through Muslim eyes. In chapters leavened with humor, hope, and insight, she recounts an immigrant's daily struggles balancing assimilation with preserving heritage, overcoming religious barriers from within and distortions of Islam from without, and confronting issues of raising her children as Muslims--while they lobby for a Christmas tree! Sabeeha Rehman was doing interfaith work for Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, the driving force behind the Muslim community center at Ground Zero, when the backlash began. She discusses what that experience revealed about American society"--

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Arcade Publishing

Arcade Publishing ha publicat 2 edicions d'aquest llibre.

Edicions: 1628726636, 1628728620

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