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Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild…
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Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities (edició 2016)

de Rebecca Solnit (Autor)

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8463019,887 (3.89)56
With Hope in the Dark, Rebecca Solnit makes a radical case for hope as a commitment to act in a world whose future remains uncertain and unknowable. Drawing on her decades of activism and a wide reading of environmental, cultural, and political history, Solnit argued that radicals have a long, neglected history of transformative victories, that the positive consequences of our acts are not always immediately seen, directly knowable, or even measurable, and that pessimism and despair rest on an unwarranted confidence about what is going to happen next.… (més)
Membre:TheBiasedBibliophile
Títol:Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities
Autors:Rebecca Solnit (Autor)
Informació:Haymarket Books (2016), Edition: Second, 184 pages
Col·leccions:Per llegir
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Hope in the Dark de Rebecca Solnit

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» Mira també 56 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 30 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Meditations are out of fashion as a literary category. When services were in another language, churchgoers needed something prayerful to keep them in the pews. They could tease out meanings from poetry or read a tract that looked at an issue of the soul every which way. Rebecca Solnot's reflection on the political left seems a lot like the latter, and there's a religious fervor for it among the Indivisible flock.

The central question is the one Sarah Palin posed mockingly: How's that hopey, changey thing working out for ya? The answer is, as it should be, I'm working on it. Change rarely comes quickly. The point doesn't lend itself well to a didactic format, and even this small volume belabors it. But I appreciate Solnot's reflection. The rosary isn't my style either.
1 vota rynk | Jul 11, 2021 |
A bunch of easy to read, short essays on the necessary function of hope to effect change. Puts modern activism into historical context, urges readers to think of justice as a continual process (not a static end goal/state), as well as to consider the counterfactual (what horrible thing *didn't* happen due to protests). Solnit critiques the "apocalypse is coming" brand of liberal cynicism that views hope as a naive anathema.

Written in 2004 but still relevant today. ( )
  jiyoungh | May 3, 2021 |
The trouble with avant guarde politics is that it is always grumpy. This is not right, that is wrong - and, of course, politics should never sit on its laurels and become self congratulatory.

The problem is that it can easily leave one feeling bleak: if one can never reach Valhalla, then perhaps one might as well give up: what's the point?

This little book is that injection of positivity that is sometimes needed. It is an excellent read and will be dipped into on many occasions. ( )
  the.ken.petersen | Mar 24, 2021 |
A great book to start off an new year with hope.

As someone who wasn't paying much attention to politics in the 90's and 2000's (seeing as I was born in '95 and caught up with things like learning how to read, and elementary school crushes) I didn't grasp all the content of this book like an adult living through those times likely would, and the Trump Administration isn't mentioned. These things definitely influenced my rating, but I did still enjoyed this book for the info nuggets and thoughtful perspectives on hope.
This collection of essays, the third edition updated in 2015, paints a crucial picture of how having hope during times of political or social injustice is the main reason that activism works in a democracy. Solnit uses real examples throughout time focusing primarily on the last 50 years (prior to the Trump administration mind you), to detail how in the darkest times hope shines brightest.
It can't be denied that Hurricane Katrina, Civil wars in South America, 9/11, and the crushing destruction of the environment by fossil fuel emissions were and are dark matters that seem(ed) hopeless. Solnit argues for hope and activism by breaking down what hope is, what it isn't, and why it's been a crucial tool for creating positive change, helping local communities, and bringing people together.

It's not easy to be hopeful when the world seems pitted against you in every way. But Rebecca makes a good case for why hope is good, why it's logical, and perhaps you may find a reason to be more hopeful about politics yourself after reading this book.

Things I need to search on Wikipedia thanks to this book teaching me I know little about them: The Bush Administration, Zapatistas, Malcolm X, Radical Center, Jazz Freedom Fighters, Reclaim The Streets, Occupy Wallstreet, Sandlot Riots 1977, Ronald Reagan, Alberta Tar Sands ( )
  Evelyn.B | Jan 19, 2021 |
“Resistance is first of all a matter of principle and a way to live, to make yourself one small republic of unconquered spirit. You hope for results, but you don’t depend on them.”⁣

“It’s always too soon to go home. Most of the great victories continue to unfold, unfinished in the sense that they are not yet fully realized but also in the sense that they continue to spread influence. A phenomenon like the civil rights movement created a vocabulary and a toolbox for social change used around the globe, so that its effects far outstrips its goals and specific achievements—and failures.”

Rebecca Solnit wrote this during the time of the Bush administration. A time that also saw the largest global protest–against the US invasion of Iraq. The message remains pertinent now, as we see ourselves gripped with a global pandemic, a return of regressive nationalism, & a dismantling of social welfare that affects & kills so many. How do we speak of hope in such terrible times? She writes of how hope always seems to shine in the dark. In great disruption often comes great opportunity to practice our most humane selves, & to rethink the way we behave, & the system that governs us.⁣

Rebecca Solnit begins by establishing that hope isn’t utopian fantasising, but a realist way of positioning one self. Being utopian & being pessimistic are both states where an individual absolves themselves from doing anything. Either because things will magically be ok, or because they’re convinced things will be hopeless. But hope, for Solnit, is the belief that the process of participating, of trying, is in itself meaningful, with full awareness that “failure” is very much possible. ⁣

Even the conception of “failure” is problematized, because every action is precious. She mentions how even though the Iraq war still happened, the protests delayed the invasion for months, possibly allowing Iraqis to prepare & evacuate, & they also managed to turn the administration from performing “shock and awe” saturation bombing which would have killed many more lives. ⁣We never know how actions that seem to yield nothing in the present may inspire someone else & create change in the future. Think of how revolutions in France & Russia went on to inspire so many other revolutions worldwide, or how Greta’s action snowballed into worldwide strikes by students in a matter of a year. What made the book especially interesting was also her sharing of her experiences in movements, the people she has met, & the wisdom they share. I especially enjoyed her insights about the environmentalist movement and how it had to strain and face its elitism. Also that bit about how sometimes victory can look a lot like nothing happened! A field unravaged, a land undrilled, a forest uncut.. makes me thankful for what is left to simply be, and how so much courage might have been practiced just to simply let things be. ( )
  verkur | Jan 8, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 30 (següent | mostra-les totes)
With great care, Solnit — whose mind remains the sharpest instrument of nuance I’ve encountered — maps the uneven terrain of our grounds for hope.

Hope in the Dark is a robust anchor of intelligent idealism amid our tumultuous era of disorienting defeatism — a vitalizing exploration of how we can withstand the marketable temptations of false hope and easy despair.
 
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Nothing that has ever happened should be regarded as lost for history.
--Walter Benjamin
If you don't like the news . . . go out and make some of your own.
--Newsman Wes Nisker's closing salutation on radio station KSAN in the 1970s
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On January 18, 1915, six months into the First World War, as all Europe was convulsed by killing and dying, Virginia Woolf wrote in her journal, "The future is dark, which is on the whole, the best thing the future can be, I think."
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With Hope in the Dark, Rebecca Solnit makes a radical case for hope as a commitment to act in a world whose future remains uncertain and unknowable. Drawing on her decades of activism and a wide reading of environmental, cultural, and political history, Solnit argued that radicals have a long, neglected history of transformative victories, that the positive consequences of our acts are not always immediately seen, directly knowable, or even measurable, and that pessimism and despair rest on an unwarranted confidence about what is going to happen next.

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