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A Gentleman in Moscow: A Novel de Amor…
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A Gentleman in Moscow: A Novel (edició 2019)

de Amor Towles (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses / Mencions
5,8923971,311 (4.4)1 / 616
"A Gentleman in Moscow immerses us in another elegantly drawn era with the story of Count Alexander Rostov. When, in 1922, he is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, the count is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel's doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him a doorway into a much larger world of emotional discovery..."--… (més)
Membre:jaymckay
Títol:A Gentleman in Moscow: A Novel
Autors:Amor Towles (Autor)
Informació:Penguin Books (2019), Edition: Reprint, 496 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

A Gentleman in Moscow de Amor Towles

  1. 10
    News of the World de Paulette Jiles (sturlington)
  2. 00
    Swimming in the Dark de Tomasz Jedrowski (potenza)
    potenza: Both poetic narratives in the Eastern Bloc
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» Mira també 616 mencions

I don't know what to say about this novel. I'm almost 200 pages in. It's smooth reading ... perhaps too smooth.

There's nothing explicitly wrong with the writing, but there's nothing excitingly right about it either (as I found was the case with, say, Hilary Mantel). I'm medium diverted, but overall, I'm beginning to think life is too short.
  tungsten_peerts | Oct 13, 2021 |
It is the business of the times to change, Mr. Halecki. And it is the business of gentlemen to change with them."

A charming novel. Amor Towles appears to belong to the genre I call faux-literature: stories with a bit of depth, historical or otherwise, and a writing style that is painted over with panache if not quite artistry. (It was no surprise to see that Towles has been associated with the novels of Scott Fitzgerald; he is the supreme purveyor of faux-literature.) There's nothing wrong with the genre at all - it may even be helpful in bringing avid readers to the pure stuff - but for someone like myself, I often find it, like Fitzgerald, grating. Perhaps it's the feeling a genuine gastronome would have on seeing my idea of "high-class" food: serving a reheated supermarket crêpe with a dusting of icing sugar, or upping the glamour of some potato chips by adding store-bought pâté. It's delightful and invigorating, but not quite the same. One begins to feel like it's a false promise for those who have never experienced haute cuisine, and a bald compromise for those who have... even if it makes me personally rather satisfied.

All of which is a harsh way of saying that - contrary to my own expectations - I adored this book. Positively revelled in it. Taking place over three decades, and set almost exclusively in one hotel in Moscow's theatre district, Towles' novel fuses character development with lush prose, a reasonably insightful long-game view of the rise of the Soviet Union, and - most importantly - a well-realised spirit of place. We spend so much time in the Metropol, that Towles has set himself an impressive task to continue to make the space surprising and enchanting, and he succeeds almost all the time.

If I'm honest, the author's attempts to be "literary" frustrated me as often as they appealed. Fair enough, he's writing a novel that is part-folk tale or allegory; this can forgive some of the flights of fancy. Perhaps I should accept that the moments that would be traditional narrative climaxes are often underserved. Perhaps I can even forgive the slightly twee footnotes, and the comic moments of Russians attempting to understand mid-20th century American culture. The novel is flirting with modernism without giving up its popular fiction niche, which is a tango that has tangled up greater writers than he. I suppose I could even invert my statement: for every moment that frustrated me, there was one that appealed. I find it very hard to dislike a writer who conjures up a scene in which actors start improvising when the lights go out during a performance of The Seagull, doing so in perfect Chekhov-ese (and transcribed on the page in script format). I genuinely bumped the book up a star because of that scene.

Will you like this book? Very probably. It appears everyone does. (My library has reduced the borrowing period on this book because of high demand!) The mingling of history and comedy with unashamedly art deco prose is an intoxicating combination for nostalgics, romantics, and tragics, every one. And even for those of us who aren't popular readers, it's a treat. ( )
  therebelprince | Oct 5, 2021 |
I did end up mostly enjoying this but remain somewhat unclear how such a lightweight book can have so many pages! It felt like a frothy confection, I kept wanting to think there was something more serious under it but the longer I read, the less I believed that. However, there is some lovely writing in it and I did end up enjoying it. At the end, when Osip says "Round up the usual suspects." I almost believed he had written the whole book just to get that sentence in.
  amyem58 | Sep 29, 2021 |
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles is a fictional, award-winning book about a Russian Count who has been subjected to live his life in a hotel. Mr. Towels is a published writer and best-selling author, this is his second novel.

Count Alexander Rostov, a Russian aristocrat, has been deemed a “non-person” by a Bolshevik tribunal. Hence, he is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol hotel, right across from the Kremlin.

Count Rostov makes the best of his life as Russian history unfolds right outside his door, and in the magnificent hotel. The circumstances the Count founds himself in open more doors than ones which were closed.

I had no idea what to expect from A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles. The synopsis itself was fascinating, but I had experience reading such books and they could quickly get bogged down.

Nevertheless, Mr. Towels managed to write a beautiful novel about friendship, parenthood, and making the best out of one’s hopeless situation. While the story is engaging, the novel’s strength is its characters and their relationships.

Count Rostov is a moral man, which begs to question how he survived that long. He is a friendly man, nonetheless, and befriends a thief, a movie star, and a lonely 9-year-old girl. As well as hotel guest, the Count also befriends hotel workers, and even consulates a military man to understand the West better.

The author brings the characters to life, each one with their own idiosyncrasies, personality, and humor. The Metropol Hotel is its own character in the book, with hidden staircases, each room with its own history and secrets.

I also very much enjoyed the study of Russian psyche and culture. The Count sees the world change from his limited view in the hotel. Ironically, that window also happen to be a front row seat to history in the making.

The novel was a pleasure to listen to, and I’m sure it will be a pleasure to read as well. As an added bonus, Rostov is a big fan of Russian literature.
And who doesn’t love books about books?

Surprisingly, I enjoyed the story much more than I thought I would. Nicholas Guy Smith, the narrator of this audiobook, manages to bring across the unique personalities of the story. ( )
  ZoharLaor | Sep 11, 2021 |
Une ambiance, un déroulé, un personnage de pure fiction, et qui pourtant éclairent une époque. ( )
  Nikoz | Sep 6, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 397 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Booklist
July 1, 2016
In his remarkable first novel, the best-selling Rules of Civility (2011), Towles etched 1930s New York in crystalline relief. Though set a world away in Moscow over the course of three decades, his latest polished literary foray into a bygone era is just as impressive. Sentenced as an incorrigible aristocrat in 1922 by the Bolsheviks to a life of house arrest in a grand Moscow hotel, Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov is spared the firing squad on the basis of a revolutionary poem he penned as an idealistic youth. Condemned, instead, to live his life confined to the indoor parameters of Metropol Hotel, he eschews bitterness in favor of committing himself to practicalities. As he carves out a new existence for himself in his shabby attic room and within the magnificent walls of the hotel-at-large, his conduct, his resolve, and his commitment to his home and to the hotel guests and staff together form a triumph of the human spirit. As Moscow undergoes vast political changes and countless social upheavals, Rostov remains, implacably and unceasingly, a gentleman. Towles presents an imaginative and unforgettable historical portrait.--Flanagan, Margaret Copyright 2016 Booklist
afegit per kthomp25 | editaBooklist
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Towles, Amorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Arjaan en Thijs van NimwegenTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Höbel, SusanneTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Smith, Nicholas GuyNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Smith, RodneyFotògrafautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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Epígraf
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How well I remember

When it came as a visitor on foot
And dwelt a while amongst us
A melody in the semblance of a mountain cat.

Well, where is our purpose now?

Like so many questions
I answer this one
With the eye-averted peeling of a pear.

With a bow I bid goodnight
And pass through terrace doors
Into the simple splendors
Of another temperate spring;

But this much I know;

It is not lost among the autumn leaves on Peter's Square.
It is not among the ashes in the Athenaeum ash cans.
It is not inside the blue pagodas of your fine Chinoiserie.

It is not in Vronsky's saddlebags;
Not in Sonnet XXX, stanza one;
Not on twenty-seven red...

                                    Where Is It Now? (Lines 1-19)
                         Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov   1913
Dedicatòria
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For Stokley and Esme
Primeres paraules
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At half past six on the twenty-first of June 1922, when Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov was escorted through the gates of the Kremlin onto Red Square, it was glorious and cool.
Citacions
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Mindful of their surroundings, the three damsels would initially speak in the hushed voices of gentility; but swept away by the currents of their own emotions, their voices would inevitably rise, such that by 11:15, even the most discreet enjoyer of a pastry would have no choice but to eavesdrop on the thousand-layered complications of their hearts.
The crowded confusion of furniture gave the Count's little domain the look of a consignment shop in the Arbat.
Yes, some claimed Emile Zhukovsky was a curmudgeon and others called him abrupt. Some said he was a short man with a shorter temper.
It was a place where Russians cut from every cloth could come to linger over coffee, happen upon friends, stumble into arguments, or drift into dalliances—and where the lone diner seated under the great glass ceiling could indulge himself in admiration, indignation, suspicion, and laughter without getting up from his chair.
Tall and thin, with a narrow head and superior demeanor, he looked rather like a bishop that had been plucked from a chessboard.
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No n'hi ha cap

"A Gentleman in Moscow immerses us in another elegantly drawn era with the story of Count Alexander Rostov. When, in 1922, he is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, the count is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel's doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him a doorway into a much larger world of emotional discovery..."--

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Mitjana: (4.4)
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