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The Infernal Battalion (The Shadow…
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The Infernal Battalion (The Shadow Campaigns): 5 (edició 2018)

de Django Wexler (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
977215,773 (4.13)15
"Military might and arcane power clash in Django Wexler's thrilling new Shadow Campaigns novel. The Beast, the ancient demon imprisoned beneath the fortress-city of Elysium for a thousand years, has been loosed on the world.It absorbs mind after mind, spreading like a plague through the north.The fell army it has raised threatens the heart of Vordan, and it is under the command of the Beast's greatest prize: legendary general Janus bet Vhalnich. As Queen Raesinia Orboan and soldiers Marcus D'Ivoire and Winter Ihernglass grapple with the aftermath of a hard-fought military campaign, they soon discover a betrayal they never could have foreseen. The news arrives like a thunderbolt: Janus has declared himself the rightful Emperor of Vordan.Chaos grips the city as officers and regiments are forced to declare for queen or emperor. Raesinia must struggle to keep her country under control and risks becoming everything she fought against. Marcus must take the field against his old commander, a man who has seemed an unbeatable strategist. And as Winter recovers from her injuries and mourns her losses, she knows the demon she carries inside her might be the only thing standing between the Beast and the destruction of everything in its path..."--"Military might and arcane powers clash in Wexler's fifth action-packed Shadow Campaigns novel. The Beast, the ancient demon imprisoned beneath Elysium for a thousand years, has been loosed on the world. It absorbs mind after mind, spreading like a plague through the north. And it threatens the heart of Vordan. As Queen Raesinia Orboan and soldiers Marcus D'Ivoire and Winter Ihernglass grapple with the aftermath of a hard fought military campaign, they soon discover they have more than arcane powers to fear--it seems they cannot trust one of their own"--… (més)
Membre:AdmiralSmug
Títol:The Infernal Battalion (The Shadow Campaigns): 5
Autors:Django Wexler (Autor)
Informació:Head of Zeus (2018), 480 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:fantasy, RD 2021

Detalls de l'obra

The Infernal Battalion de Django Wexler

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Es mostren 1-5 de 7 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Janus is a mary sue, the main villain is an idiot, Marcus is a buffoon, Winter's sick, Raesinia's useless, and the whole reason this book happened was an accident. More fucking details under the cut because this is the ending, yo.

“When you look into the abyss, it’s not supposed to wave back.” - Fucking Janus, Probably.

THE FINAL RANKING:

tTN (1)

A characters (metaphorical) weaknesses are always (metaphorically) greater than their (metaphorical) strengths. That is, the flaws, whatever kind, a character has are always more engaging, more important, and more interesting then how much you shill for them. Janus is good at everything. But, we should afraid, because after all, he plans deep.

Nah, fuck that.

Janus' deeper plans are both virtually non-existent and completely purposeless. Mya does not matter, both inside and outside the narrative. Janus was never going to have an opportunity to bring her back, even without The Beast hijacking his body. In just one book, Wexler introduced a plot point, stabbed it in the back, and burned the body. Ah well, at least there's the oh-so wacky stinger. This leaves Janus without any importance, interest or engagement. He is exactly what he seems to be, and that is the best at everything, or at least as good as his opponents. There are no consequences to all the build up for his clandestinity.

Let's talk about that his opponents. The Beast fell for the same exact trick he pulled.

He has no good reason to listen to Janus. If we was any smart, he would do the samething the Pontifex of the Black would do, listen, never underestimate him, and most importantly, keep him contained. All the time before Karis, and he didn't absorb the knowledge of a single military officer? If it's supposed to be ironic, then it fails because the text doesn't support the subtext. Janus isn't smart (as apparently he should be, see above), The Beast is dumb. Very, very dumb.

Speaking of dumb (its a segue, you see) the other major plot twist of Winter's identity is one: entirely predictable and two: entirely hokey. I called it, just because I thought the author would take the most melodramatic route possible. Aside from Sothe's character arc, which admittedly is pretty good, it has no effect other than the immediate. And even then, taking it out while keeping Sothe's stuff isn't too difficult. It is ultimately resolved (as much as it is) by reverting to before the reveal. It has no consequences to the relationship between these characters.

Similarily, pretty much nothing happens to Raesinia throughout this book. Every problem is dealt with with no lasting changes. The only progression is her relationship with Marcus, which I did not buy for a second. This is not as a big deal, but still. My dude Matthew got robbed /s. There wer no consequences.

The best of the three main characters is Winter Ihernglass. I didn't recognize it at first, but her plot line was the most engaging and most interesting (those are not the same thing, btw). Her relationship with Jane was the best part of this whole series, even though I could barely read through some of those sections (in a good way). There are conseuqences to the actions between them.

Oh yeah the accident: why didn't Infernivore kill The Beast the first time? Winter didn't seem to do anything different. I imagine that if Winter woke up slightly different that day she would just be slightly less cognizant of the demon, and that would do it and this whole book wouldn't happen. Fucking consequences, I guess.


There is one caveat, if he announces a sequel of any kind, I will gobble that up. It makes so much more sense with more to come. ( )
  Raykoda3 | Sep 25, 2020 |
Janus is a mary sue, the main villain is an idiot, Marcus is a buffoon, Winter's sick, Raesinia's useless, and the whole reason this book happened was an accident. More fucking details under the cut because this is the ending, yo.

“When you look into the abyss, it’s not supposed to wave back.” - Fucking Janus, Probably.

THE FINAL RANKING:

tTN (1)

A characters (metaphorical) weaknesses are always (metaphorically) greater than their (metaphorical) strengths. That is, the flaws, whatever kind, a character has are always more engaging, more important, and more interesting then how much you shill for them. Janus is good at everything. But, we should afraid, because after all, he plans deep.

Nah, fuck that.

Janus' deeper plans are both virtually non-existent and completely purposeless. Mya does not matter, both inside and outside the narrative. Janus was never going to have an opportunity to bring her back, even without The Beast hijacking his body. In just one book, Wexler introduced a plot point, stabbed it in the back, and burned the body. Ah well, at least there's the oh-so wacky stinger. This leaves Janus without any importance, interest or engagement. He is exactly what he seems to be, and that is the best at everything, or at least as good as his opponents. There are no consequences to all the build up for his clandestinity.

Let's talk about that his opponents. The Beast fell for the same exact trick he pulled.

He has no good reason to listen to Janus. If we was any smart, he would do the samething the Pontifex of the Black would do, listen, never underestimate him, and most importantly, keep him contained. All the time before Karis, and he didn't absorb the knowledge of a single military officer? If it's supposed to be ironic, then it fails because the text doesn't support the subtext. Janus isn't smart (as apparently he should be, see above), The Beast is dumb. Very, very dumb.

Speaking of dumb (its a segue, you see) the other major plot twist of Winter's identity is one: entirely predictable and two: entirely hokey. I called it, just because I thought the author would take the most melodramatic route possible. Aside from Sothe's character arc, which admittedly is pretty good, it has no effect other than the immediate. And even then, taking it out while keeping Sothe's stuff isn't too difficult. It is ultimately resolved (as much as it is) by reverting to before the reveal. It has no consequences to the relationship between these characters.

Similarily, pretty much nothing happens to Raesinia throughout this book. Every problem is dealt with with no lasting changes. The only progression is her relationship with Marcus, which I did not buy for a second. This is not as a big deal, but still. My dude Matthew got robbed /s. There wer no consequences.

The best of the three main characters is Winter Ihernglass. I didn't recognize it at first, but her plot line was the most engaging and most interesting (those are not the same thing, btw). Her relationship with Jane was the best part of this whole series, even though I could barely read through some of those sections (in a good way). There are conseuqences to the actions between them.

Oh yeah the accident: why didn't Infernivore kill The Beast the first time? Winter didn't seem to do anything different. I imagine that if Winter woke up slightly different that day she would just be slightly less cognizant of the demon, and that would do it and this whole book wouldn't happen. Fucking consequences, I guess.


There is one caveat, if he announces a sequel of any kind, I will gobble that up. It makes so much more sense with more to come. ( )
  sigma16 | Dec 5, 2019 |
Janus is a mary sue, the main villain is an idiot, Marcus is a buffoon, Winter's sick, Raesinia's useless, and the whole reason this book happened was an accident. More fucking details under the cut because this is the ending, yo.

“When you look into the abyss, it’s not supposed to wave back.” - Fucking Janus, Probably.

THE FINAL RANKING:

tTN (1)

A characters (metaphorical) weaknesses are always (metaphorically) greater than their (metaphorical) strengths. That is, the flaws, whatever kind, a character has are always more engaging, more important, and more interesting then how much you shill for them. Janus is good at everything. But, we should afraid, because after all, he plans deep.

Nah, fuck that.

Janus' deeper plans are both virtually non-existent and completely purposeless. Mya does not matter, both inside and outside the narrative. Janus was never going to have an opportunity to bring her back, even without The Beast hijacking his body. In just one book, Wexler introduced a plot point, stabbed it in the back, and burned the body. Ah well, at least there's the oh-so wacky stinger. This leaves Janus without any importance, interest or engagement. He is exactly what he seems to be, and that is the best at everything, or at least as good as his opponents. There are no consequences to all the build up for his clandestinity.

Let's talk about that his opponents. The Beast fell for the same exact trick he pulled.

He has no good reason to listen to Janus. If we was any smart, he would do the samething the Pontifex of the Black would do, listen, never underestimate him, and most importantly, keep him contained. All the time before Karis, and he didn't absorb the knowledge of a single military officer? If it's supposed to be ironic, then it fails because the text doesn't support the subtext. Janus isn't smart (as apparently he should be, see above), The Beast is dumb. Very, very dumb.

Speaking of dumb (its a segue, you see) the other major plot twist of Winter's identity is one: entirely predictable and two: entirely hokey. I called it, just because I thought the author would take the most melodramatic route possible. Aside from Sothe's character arc, which admittedly is pretty good, it has no effect other than the immediate. And even then, taking it out while keeping Sothe's stuff isn't too difficult. It is ultimately resolved (as much as it is) by reverting to before the reveal. It has no consequences to the relationship between these characters.

Similarily, pretty much nothing happens to Raesinia throughout this book. Every problem is dealt with with no lasting changes. The only progression is her relationship with Marcus, which I did not buy for a second. This is not as a big deal, but still. My dude Matthew got robbed /s. There wer no consequences.

The best of the three main characters is Winter Ihernglass. I didn't recognize it at first, but her plot line was the most engaging and most interesting (those are not the same thing, btw). Her relationship with Jane was the best part of this whole series, even though I could barely read through some of those sections (in a good way). There are conseuqences to the actions between them.

Oh yeah the accident: why didn't Infernivore kill The Beast the first time? Winter didn't seem to do anything different. I imagine that if Winter woke up slightly different that day she would just be slightly less cognizant of the demon, and that would do it and this whole book wouldn't happen. Fucking consequences, I guess.


There is one caveat, if he announces a sequel of any kind, I will gobble that up. It makes so much more sense with more to come. ( )
  sigma16 | Dec 5, 2019 |
The Infernal Battalion is the fifth and final book in Wexler’s flintlock fantasy series, The Shadow Campaigns. I enjoyed the whole series, and I was very satisfied with how everything wrapped up in this last book.

The series primarily focuses on military and political matters in a fictional world, with a pretty heavy emphasis on military maneuvers and battles. That aspect of the story never grew tedious to me, not even after five books, because there was always something different going on and the story remained focused on the characters involved. I enjoyed all the main characters and most of the secondary ones. There are some strong females, including two of the main POV characters. There is some magic, and it plays an important role in the story, but it’s in the background much of the time. I thought the magic system was fleshed out well. It was believable within the context of the story, and it was kept in balance so that it was equal parts threatening and helpful without causing the non-magical actions taking place to seem ineffective or pointless.

Sometimes I felt like things were a little too coincidental, but it wasn’t the kind of convenient, unexpected coincidence that really annoys me. The groundwork for everything was laid in advance and followed a logical progression so that events and revelations were believable. I was able to predict several of the revelations in advance using clues the author had given, and I enjoyed that. I wasn’t always completely engrossed in the story, but there were many moments when I was and I still enjoyed it a lot even when I was less engrossed. I was especially wrapped up in the story during this last book and I’m rating it 4.5 stars, rounding up to 5 on Goodreads.

I have a few more comments for the spoiler tags…
I really enjoyed the character of Janus throughout this series and I was glad he didn’t turn out to be evil, even if he was a bit obsessed. I loved seeing him match wits with the Beast and still manage to manipulate events to his satisfaction even when he wasn’t in full control of his own mind or body. I had to laugh at the end when he only managed to live a quiet life in exile for about a year.

I was glad Jane was less visible in these last two books. She was less annoying as a villain. :)

Marcus and Winter being siblings is one of the things I had in mind when I referred to coincidental things earlier in my review. I knew that revelation was coming based on hints the author gave in the previous book, and I enjoyed figuring that out and then seeing the characters discover and deal with it, but the coincidental aspect of it niggled at me a bit.
( )
1 vota YouKneeK | Mar 8, 2019 |
The Infernal Battalion is the fifth, and final, book in Django Wexler's Shadow Campaigns series.

Peace came briefly to Vordan, but it is not long before the Beast of Judgement turns an eye to the country in an attempt to claim the Thousands Names, the massive steel tablets bearing the names of legions of demons. It is only Winter's Infernivore, and the Names themselves that stand as true obstacles to the Beast’s complete domination of humanity.

Janus bet Vhalnich, one of the greatest generals of Vordan, has fallen to the Beast's influence, and now leads an army against the Queen, calling himself Emperor of Murnsk and Vordan. As Marcus and the Army of the Republic face off against Janus, Winter fights to get back to Vordan and seeks a way to reach the Beast of Judgement's core host, so she can use Infernivore.

Meanwhile, Queen Raesinia seeks aid from Borel, not so long ago enemy to Vordan. But it is only Winter and her traveling companions who know the full depth of danger they face. To the others, the Beast is a creature out of legend. Janus alone is a dangerous foe. With the Beast's control, he is downright lethal. Not every enemy is an enemy though, and the Vordanai forces find the assistance of a master strategist giving subtle aid. Will all the pieces in this far-flung grand game of chess end up where they need to be for a full checkmate?

I love the Shadow Campaigns series! This is a brilliant series that blends technology with magic, and is military fantasy at its best. Much as I love Game of Thrones, I like this series more. These civilisations are roughly evolved to the equivalent of say, the US Civil War, or the Napoleonic Wars. Cavalry is utilised, and bayonets/muskets, along with cannon. The attention and depth of detail to the battle sequences is breathtaking, and terrifying, painting a very vivid picture. It's clear the author is well-researched in this area, and I felt immersed in the soldiers’ terror of battle, and their courage to stand and fight.

This is a world where demons exist, and those possessed by them have abilities both feared and revered. These demons require a host. Their names are recorded in the Thousand Names, and a person reads the name in a ritual, binding with the demon, and it's not uncommon for death to occur. Each demon offers different gifts, allowing the host to heal, or travel as sand, or never die, among other things.

Throughout this book, and the series as a whole, many different cultures are explored- Vordanai, Haeta, Borelgai, Khandarai. The anthropologist in me appreciates this! Here, again, Wexler has paid attention to detail. Each culture has its own values and personality traits, sometimes bringing characters into serious conflict.

Each chapter follows the perspective of one particular character, and I looked forward to reading each. Usually, in cases where the chapters follow different people, there's always one story thread that's just not as interesting. None of these were boring in the slightest and each had vastly different things going on. Marcus was in the midst of war, right on the front lines. Raesinia’s story focused on more courtly aspects. Winter was on a desperate, headlong flight. Janus’ was the most alien of all, as he navigated working with the Beast.

Ideally, these books should be read in order. There is enough information threaded through the narrative though that, even if you jump in the middle, you'll find footing quick enough. Through this series, Wexler has become one of my favourite authors, and I look forward to his next work!

***Many thanks to Netgalley and Penguin/Random House for providing an egalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. ( )
  PardaMustang | Jan 31, 2018 |
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"Military might and arcane power clash in Django Wexler's thrilling new Shadow Campaigns novel. The Beast, the ancient demon imprisoned beneath the fortress-city of Elysium for a thousand years, has been loosed on the world.It absorbs mind after mind, spreading like a plague through the north.The fell army it has raised threatens the heart of Vordan, and it is under the command of the Beast's greatest prize: legendary general Janus bet Vhalnich. As Queen Raesinia Orboan and soldiers Marcus D'Ivoire and Winter Ihernglass grapple with the aftermath of a hard-fought military campaign, they soon discover a betrayal they never could have foreseen. The news arrives like a thunderbolt: Janus has declared himself the rightful Emperor of Vordan.Chaos grips the city as officers and regiments are forced to declare for queen or emperor. Raesinia must struggle to keep her country under control and risks becoming everything she fought against. Marcus must take the field against his old commander, a man who has seemed an unbeatable strategist. And as Winter recovers from her injuries and mourns her losses, she knows the demon she carries inside her might be the only thing standing between the Beast and the destruction of everything in its path..."--"Military might and arcane powers clash in Wexler's fifth action-packed Shadow Campaigns novel. The Beast, the ancient demon imprisoned beneath Elysium for a thousand years, has been loosed on the world. It absorbs mind after mind, spreading like a plague through the north. And it threatens the heart of Vordan. As Queen Raesinia Orboan and soldiers Marcus D'Ivoire and Winter Ihernglass grapple with the aftermath of a hard fought military campaign, they soon discover they have more than arcane powers to fear--it seems they cannot trust one of their own"--

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