IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How…
S'està carregant…

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated… (2017 original; edició 2017)

de Richard Rothstein (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,1002513,378 (4.35)31
In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation--that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes it clear that it was de jure segregation--the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments--that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. Through extraordinary revelations and extensive research that Ta-Nehisi Coates has lauded as "brilliant" (The Atlantic), Rothstein comes to chronicle nothing less than an untold story that begins in the 1920s, showing how this process of de jure segregation began with explicit racial zoning, as millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the South to the North.As Jane Jacobs established in her classic The Death and Life of Great American Cities, it was the deeply flawed urban planning of the 1950s that created many of the impoverished neighborhoods we know. Now, Rothstein expands our understanding of this history, showing how government policies led to the creation of officially segregated public housing and the demolition of previously integrated neighborhoods. While urban areas rapidly deteriorated, the great American suburbanization of the post-World War II years was spurred on by federal subsidies for builders on the condition that no homes be sold to African Americans. Finally, Rothstein shows how police and prosecutors brutally upheld these standards by supporting violent resistance to black families in white neighborhoods. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 prohibited future discrimination but did nothing to reverse residential patterns that had become deeply embedded. Yet recent outbursts of violence in cities like Baltimore, Ferguson, and Milwaukee show us precisely how the legacy of these earlier eras contributes to persistent racial unrest. "The American landscape will never look the same to readers of this important book," comments Sherrilyn A. Ifill. Indeed, Rothstein's invaluable examination demonstrates that only by relearning American urban history can we finally pave the way for the nation to remedy its unconstitutional past. -- Inside jacket flaps.… (més)
Membre:RobertABielinskiMD
Títol:The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America
Autors:Richard Rothstein (Autor)
Informació:Liveright (2017), Edition: Illustrated, 368 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America de Richard Rothstein (Author) (2017)

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 31 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 25 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Rothstein describes how the American government systemically imposed residential segregation with a variety of covert tactics. Racial zoning, and subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs, tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation, and much more, The Color of Law is a must read for anyone wanting to understand how racism is woven into our systems.

Review from: The Write of Your Life. A List of Books About Racism.
  stlukeschurch | Mar 8, 2021 |
We, white people, have so much to atone for! Where to begin? Let's wipe these laws out and teach our children differently! ( )
  hemlokgang | Jan 27, 2021 |
Eye opening and disheartening. ( )
  Grace.Van.Moer | Jan 4, 2021 |
Rothstein is giving me everything I am looking for in a nonfiction read. The Color of Law is a well researched, clearly written, and artfully organized account of discriminatory house practices in the US, and how they contributed to racialized segregation and economic disparity, still felt today. Rothstein is not arguing that these housing practices were the sole cause of segregation and disparity; rather, the government's actions were strong contributing factors that violated the constitutional rights of Black Americans. Such a profound violation of these rights demands a remedy.

After presenting his arguments, Rothstein provides practical recommendations, taking into consideration the political and economic forces that make some idyllic policies and initiatives impossible at this time. In no way does he suggest that righting history will be easy, but he persuades his readers that it is necessary.

Some sections feel a bit dry, but that may be part and parcel with the detail he communicates—overall, a worthwhile read. ( )
1 vota eljay12 | Dec 13, 2020 |
This book details how neighborhoods were designed to keep POC out. I documents builders, home owners, city leaders, HUD, and the police discriminated against Blacks in America. The laws in place were ignored in favor of keeping neighborhoods with mostly white people and concentrating Blacks into small communities. ( )
  caanderson | Nov 29, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 25 (següent | mostra-les totes)
But since American schools don’t teach the true history of systemic racial segregation, Rothstein asks, “Is it any wonder [students] come to believe that African-Americans are only segregated because they don’t want to marry or because they prefer to live only among themselves?” Only when Americans learn a common—and accurate—history of our nation’s racial divisions, he contends, will we then be able to consider steps to fulfill our legal and moral obligations. For the rest of us, still trying to work past 40 years of misinformation, there might not be a better place to start than Rothstein’s book.
afegit per elenchus | editaSlate.com, Rachel M. Cohen (May 7, 2017)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (2 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Rothstein, RichardAutorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Attardo, StevenDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Grupper, AdamNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Koven, BrookeDissenyadorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
When from 2014 t0 2016, riots in places like Ferguson, Baltimore, Milwaukee, or Charlotte captured our attention, most of us thought we knew how these segregated neighborhoods with their crime, violence, anger, and poverty came to be. (Preface)
We think of the San Francisco Bay area as one of the nation's more liberal and inclusive regions.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation--that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes it clear that it was de jure segregation--the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments--that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. Through extraordinary revelations and extensive research that Ta-Nehisi Coates has lauded as "brilliant" (The Atlantic), Rothstein comes to chronicle nothing less than an untold story that begins in the 1920s, showing how this process of de jure segregation began with explicit racial zoning, as millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the South to the North.As Jane Jacobs established in her classic The Death and Life of Great American Cities, it was the deeply flawed urban planning of the 1950s that created many of the impoverished neighborhoods we know. Now, Rothstein expands our understanding of this history, showing how government policies led to the creation of officially segregated public housing and the demolition of previously integrated neighborhoods. While urban areas rapidly deteriorated, the great American suburbanization of the post-World War II years was spurred on by federal subsidies for builders on the condition that no homes be sold to African Americans. Finally, Rothstein shows how police and prosecutors brutally upheld these standards by supporting violent resistance to black families in white neighborhoods. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 prohibited future discrimination but did nothing to reverse residential patterns that had become deeply embedded. Yet recent outbursts of violence in cities like Baltimore, Ferguson, and Milwaukee show us precisely how the legacy of these earlier eras contributes to persistent racial unrest. "The American landscape will never look the same to readers of this important book," comments Sherrilyn A. Ifill. Indeed, Rothstein's invaluable examination demonstrates that only by relearning American urban history can we finally pave the way for the nation to remedy its unconstitutional past. -- Inside jacket flaps.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.35)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 6
3.5 5
4 36
4.5 8
5 40

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 157,159,391 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible