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The Children of Hurin de J.R.R. Tolkien
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The Children of Hurin (2007 original; edició 2007)

de J.R.R. Tolkien (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses / Mencions
9,106123628 (3.86)1 / 145
Painstakingly restored from Tolkien's manuscripts and presented for the first time as a fully continuous and stand alone story, the epic tale of The Children of Húrin will reunite fans of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings with Elves and Men, dragons and Dwarves, eagles and Orcs, and the rich landscape and characters unique to Tolkien. There are tales of Middle-earth from times long before The Lord of the Rings, and the story told in this book is set in the great country that lay beyond the Grey Havens in the West: lands where Treebeard once walked, but which were drowned in the great cataclysm that ended the First Age of the World. In that remote time Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, dwelt in the vast fortress of Angband, the Hells of Iron, in the North; and the tragedy of Túrin and his sister Nienor unfolded within the shadow of the fear of Angband and the war waged by Morgoth against the lands and secret cities of the Elves. Their brief and passionate lives were dominated by the elemental hatred that Morgoth bore them as the children of Húrin, the man who had dared to defy and to scorn him to his face. Against them he sent his most formidable servant, Glaurung, a powerful spirit in the form of a huge wingless dragon of fire. Into this story of brutal conquest and flight, of forest hiding-places and pursuit, of resistance with lessening hope, the Dark Lord and the Dragon enter in direly articulate form. Sardonic and mocking, Glaurung manipulated the fates of Túrin and Nienor by lies of diabolic cunning and guile, and the curse of Morgoth was fulfilled. The earliest versions of this story by J.R.R. Tolkien go back to the end of the First World War and the years that followed; but long afterwards, when The Lord of the Rings was finished, he wrote it anew and greatly enlarged it in complexities of motive and character: it became the dominant story in his later work on Middle-earth. But he could not bring it to a final and finished form. In this book Christopher Tolkien has constructed, after long study of the manuscripts, a coherent narrative without any editorial invention.… (més)
Membre:Micah_Jelinek
Títol:The Children of Hurin
Autors:J.R.R. Tolkien (Autor)
Informació:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2007), 313 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Els fills d'en Hurin de J. R. R. Tolkien (2007)

  1. 90
    El Silmaríl·lion de J. R. R. Tolkien (Jitsusama)
    Jitsusama: The Silmarillion is an essential book to better understand the occurrences surrounding the Children of Hurin. It also contains a slightly shorter version of the tale.
  2. 31
    The Fall of Gondolin de J. R. R. Tolkien (Michael.Rimmer)
  3. 21
    Beren and Lúthien de J. R. R. Tolkien (Michael.Rimmer)
  4. 10
    The Broken Sword de Poul Anderson (themulhern)
    themulhern: A grim doom, lots of fighting, hidden identities, slightly different elves.
  5. 22
    The Whale Kingdom Quest de Ming-Wei (Rossi21)
    Rossi21: Good science fiction book, well worth a read
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Es mostren 1-5 de 121 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Christopher Tolkien has taken a number of fragments his father left about an ancient Middle-earth tale and stitched them together into a somewhat coherent narrative; the notes at the end give a pretty good sense of how he did it. This unites material from across Tolkien's life, and also uses some pieces from The Silmarillion to fill in the gaps. (Contrary to what the top review on LT claims, though, C. Tolkien did not "cho[o]se to edit it into prose instead of keeping it as rhymed verse the way his father had written it"; the rhymed verse was from a separate attempt at the story.)

It makes for an odd book. In The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien adopted a pretty usual novelistic style, keeping us close to events. In The Silmarillion, he took a more distant style (in fact, he saw The Silmarillion as a synopsis of a much more detailed work that he never wrote). Children of Húrin ends up swerving back and forth. We have some bits where we're in scenes and learning about the ways characters think; we have other scenes that do things like "they fought together for three years and became the best of friends" and we just have to accept that these characters are friends now. On average, I would say we're somewhere in between those two points in terms of detail. Closer to Túrin than we ever get to any Silmarillion character, but you'll never come to know Túrin the way you did Bilbo or Frodo or Faramir.

At times the book really comes to life; I liked the glimpses of Túrin's childhood, and I liked his robber baron years. On the other hand, the overall effect of the book is pretty muted. If one is meant to feel the tragedy of Túrin and his family... you just don't, there's not enough here to make you do it. I kept thinking I would like to see someone else take this and expand it so it can have the emotional effect it deserves to. I'd hate to see someone else try to fill in Tolkien's prose, but I also think someone else writing it from scratch wouldn't quite feel right. So perhaps it would work best transposed into another medium; the idea I had was that I feel like it would make for an excellent graphic novel, or series of graphic novels. (Get P. Craig Russell to do it!)

I of course got a lot of enjoyment out of the notes at the back explaining how the story had been put together. That said, I mostly read this because my wife owned it; interesting as it was, I don't think I would take the time to read the subsequent posthumous "novels" Christopher Tolkien assembled out of his father's materials (Beren and Lúthien and The Fall of Gondolin). Sometimes reading prequels can be interesting, of course, but this is so detached from the era of Lord of the Rings that it feels like a standalone fantasy world that reuses some of the same names.
  Stevil2001 | Jun 4, 2021 |
I loved this book! As a Tolkien fan, it is always a pleasure to dive into Middle-earth.. The content of this book is very much inspired by classic heroic stories and you can see the norse influence on almost every page! A must-read for every fantasy fan and especially every person that loves Tolkien's tales and world! ( )
  plitzdom | May 12, 2021 |
To some degree a retelling of Northern legend, Children of Hurin is my favorite of Tolkein's stories. I like to think that this is Tolkien exactly where he wants to be, at the corner of mythology and fantasy, rewriting the elements of ancient epics into an elves-and-men high fantasy. ( )
  RNCoble | Mar 25, 2021 |
Aaah! It felt so good being back in Middle-earth, even if only for such a short tale. Tolkien remains a marvel to read, even through his posthumously released work.

The Children of Húrin is a beautiful and full tale of a man who cannot shed his doom. It contains a lot of story in only a few pages, so it is painted in broad brush strokes with sometimes years passing in a single paragraph. However, it remains a page turner as such and describes some important events from the Elder Days beautifully.

Recommended for all Tolkien fans, but also other fantasy lovers. ( )
  bbbart | Dec 27, 2020 |
I quite enjoyed this story. It's heroic and tragic in all the right ways, and it is more accessible, I think, than many of Tolkien's other "lost tales" and mythologies in his legendarium. It succeeds in being a well-structured story with a set of boundaries, and although there might be a few too many names to remember (and that's just referring to the names Túrin gives himself!), it is well worth the read. ( )
  octoberdad | Dec 16, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 121 (següent | mostra-les totes)
... So there's something very pagan about Tolkien's world, and it gets more pagan as we go further back. The Children of Húrin is practically Wagnerian. It has a lone, brooding hero, a supremely malicious dragon, a near-magical helmet, a long-standing curse, a dwarf of ambiguous moral character called Mîm and - the clincher, this - incest. Which is here a disaster and not, as in Wagner, a two-fingers-to-fate passion. Readers will already have come across the story in its essence in The Silmarillion and, substantially, in Unfinished Tales, which came out in 1980. One suspects that those who bought the latter book will not feel too cheated when they buy and read The Children of Húrin. ...

Christopher Tolkien has brought together his father's text as well, I think, as he can. In an afterword, he attests to the difficulty his father had in imposing "a firm narrative structure" on the story, and indeed it does give the impression of simply being one damned thing after another, with the hero, Túrin, stomping around the forests in a continuous sulk at his fate, much of which, it seems, he has brought upon himself.

As to whether the story brings out the feeling of "deep time" which Tolkien considered one of the duties of his brand of imaginative literature, I cannot really tell, for I do not take this kind of thing as seriously as I did when I was a boy and feel that perhaps the onus for the creation of such a sense of wonder is being placed too much on the reader. Actually, the First Age here seems a pretty miserable place to be; Orcs everywhere, people being hunted into outlawhood or beggary, and with no relief, light or otherwise, from a grumpy, pipe-smoking wizard. But it does have a strange atmosphere all of its own. Maybe it does work.
afegit per Cynfelyn | editaThe Guardian, Nicholas Lezard (Apr 28, 2007)
 
Inspired by the Norse tale of Sigurd and Fafnir, Tolkien first wrote a story about a dragon in 1899, at the age of 7. At school he discovered the Kalevala, a Finnish epic poem, and by 1914 was trying to turn the tale of Kullervo into “a short story somewhat on the lines of Morris’s romances”. By 1919 he had combined these elements in what became the tale of Túrin Turambar.

The book is beautiful, but other than the atmospheric illustrations by Alan Lee, and a discussion of the editorial process, much of what lies between the covers was actually published in either The Silmarillion (1977) or Unfinished Tales (1980). Yet this new, whole version serves a valuable purpose. In The Children of Húrin we could at last have the successor to The Lord of the Rings that was so earnestly and hopelessly sought by Tolkien’s publishers in the late 1950s.
afegit per Celebrimbor | editaThe Times, Jeremy Marshall (Apr 14, 2007)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (30 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Tolkien, J. R. R.autor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Tolkien, ChristopherEditorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Ciuferri, CaterinaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Cuijpers, PeterTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Cvetković Sever, VladimirTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
De Turris, GianfrancoCol·laboradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Juva, KerstiTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Lee, AlanIl·lustradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Lee, ChristopherNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Martin, AliceTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Pekkanen, PanuTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Pesch, Helmut W.Traductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Principe, QuirinoCol·laboradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Schütz, Hans J.Traductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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Hador Goldenhead was a lord of the Edain and well-beloved by the Eldar.
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A man that flies from his fear may find that he has only taken a short cut to meet it.
For a man may love war, and yet dread many things.
The doom lies in yourself, not in your name.
For victory is victory, however small, nor is its worth only from what follows from it.
Let the unseen days be. Today is more than enough.
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Painstakingly restored from Tolkien's manuscripts and presented for the first time as a fully continuous and stand alone story, the epic tale of The Children of Húrin will reunite fans of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings with Elves and Men, dragons and Dwarves, eagles and Orcs, and the rich landscape and characters unique to Tolkien. There are tales of Middle-earth from times long before The Lord of the Rings, and the story told in this book is set in the great country that lay beyond the Grey Havens in the West: lands where Treebeard once walked, but which were drowned in the great cataclysm that ended the First Age of the World. In that remote time Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, dwelt in the vast fortress of Angband, the Hells of Iron, in the North; and the tragedy of Túrin and his sister Nienor unfolded within the shadow of the fear of Angband and the war waged by Morgoth against the lands and secret cities of the Elves. Their brief and passionate lives were dominated by the elemental hatred that Morgoth bore them as the children of Húrin, the man who had dared to defy and to scorn him to his face. Against them he sent his most formidable servant, Glaurung, a powerful spirit in the form of a huge wingless dragon of fire. Into this story of brutal conquest and flight, of forest hiding-places and pursuit, of resistance with lessening hope, the Dark Lord and the Dragon enter in direly articulate form. Sardonic and mocking, Glaurung manipulated the fates of Túrin and Nienor by lies of diabolic cunning and guile, and the curse of Morgoth was fulfilled. The earliest versions of this story by J.R.R. Tolkien go back to the end of the First World War and the years that followed; but long afterwards, when The Lord of the Rings was finished, he wrote it anew and greatly enlarged it in complexities of motive and character: it became the dominant story in his later work on Middle-earth. But he could not bring it to a final and finished form. In this book Christopher Tolkien has constructed, after long study of the manuscripts, a coherent narrative without any editorial invention.

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