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How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World…
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How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds (edició 2017)

de Alan Jacobs (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
347457,029 (3.88)6
"Absolutely splendid . . . essential for understanding why there is so much bad thinking in political life right now." --David Brooks, New York Times How to Think is a contrarian treatise on why we're not as good at thinking as we assume--but how recovering this lost art can rescue our inner lives from the chaos of modern life.   As a celebrated cultural critic and a writer for national publications like The Atlantic and Harper's, Alan Jacobs has spent his adult life belonging to communities that often clash in America's culture wars. And in his years of confronting the big issues that divide us--political, social, religious--Jacobs has learned that many of our fiercest disputes occur not because we're doomed to be divided, but because the people involved simply aren't thinking.   Most of us don't want to think. Thinking is trouble. Thinking can force us out of familiar, comforting habits, and it can complicate our relationships with like-minded friends. Finally, thinking is slow, and that's a problem when our habits of consuming information (mostly online) leave us lost in the spin cycle of social media, partisan bickering, and confirmation bias.   In this smart, endlessly entertaining book, Jacobs diagnoses the many forces that act on us to prevent thinking--forces that have only worsened in the age of Twitter, "alternative facts," and information overload--and he also dispels the many myths we hold about what it means to think well. (For example: It's impossible to "think for yourself.")   Drawing on sources as far-flung as novelist Marilynne Robinson, basketball legend Wilt Chamberlain, British philosopher John Stuart Mill, and Christian theologian C.S. Lewis, Jacobs digs into the nuts and bolts of the cognitive process, offering hope that each of us can reclaim our mental lives from the impediments that plague us all. Because if we can learn to think together, maybe we can learn to live together, too.… (més)
Membre:mwiebe
Títol:How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds
Autors:Alan Jacobs (Autor)
Informació:Currency (2017), Edition: Illustrated, 160 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds de Alan Jacobs

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» Mira també 6 mencions

Es mostren totes 4
I will be using this book as a text in a Freshman university course. There is a lot to consider with this book but I feel it will be accessible to the students and a conversation starter to say the least. ( )
  AR_bookbird | Dec 17, 2020 |
LT How to Think, Alan Jacob, CURRENCY-Penguin Random House, 2017
Where is hard copy? philosophy section of BCSA west wall bottom shelf
Gift from Holly Stratton 8/8/20

Theme: how to think
Type: philosophy
Value: 1-
Age: col
Interest: 1- (2+?) hard to follow sometimes

Objectionable:
Vocabulary:
Synopsis/Noteworthy:

Review of literature/incorporate reading 11
Daniel Kahneman 15
People don’t want to think 17
Puritan illustration 21 People use code words/attitudes t get into the clubhouse even though they don’t know what they are talking about: it is popular to condemn the Puritans, gets you into the club
We think emotionally 22-23
Academics are poor thinkers often because what gets them accepted into high learning is good grades 24
We are in multiple communities and it helps us to be objective as to truth, as we sincerely look from different perspectives 25
Repugnant Cultural Others 26
Thinking is an art 29
Thinking sacrifices security 35
JS Mills upbringing (was emotion-denying) 41-44, 84
Whole person necessary-feelings 43
“break on the floor” 52, cf. 98
The mind reasons to the heart’s predilections 54, 58
Inner ring 55, 58
Roger Scruton 65, 74 “unscrupulous optimism” condemns those who don’t share my vision
Outgroup animosity is greater than ingroup support 73
Proceduralism 75 all must abide by the same rules
Respect others 76, 98
Bulverism 78 the logical fallacy of assuming without discussion that a person is wrong and then distracting his or her attention from this
Woman with no fear 85- need for prejudice and custom
Mad man is one with pure unalloyed reason 88
Call out numbers to tell jokes 94
Analogies, myth making 104
Agree as to what said 108
Healthy community 138
David Foster Wallace 139, 143 “rigor and humility (passionate conviction plus a sedulous [persevering and constant effort or application] respect for the convictions of others), plus 100% intellectual integrity—you have to be willing to look honestly at yourself and at your motives for believing what you believe, and to do it more or less continually”
Everything is connected 141
Sum of book 143 pursuit of truth, tragic consequence
Ability to code switch 144-145
Plausibility structures (D. A. Carson) 146

Other reading 25, 35, 139
Whit 36, 42
MJH 139, 143 ( )
  keithhamblen | Sep 1, 2020 |
Thought provoking book (as intended). Good examples of various wrong patterns of thinking common to all people. Closes with a checklist of ways to be less narrow-minded. ( )
  RLHorton | Jan 26, 2018 |
I noped out of this one when it became clear that the moral of the story was "be more tolerant of people with views you find monstrous," which, while not objectionable on its face, is clearly insufficient to our current times and needs to come with way more caveats than the author is offering. ( )
  jen.e.moore | Dec 31, 2017 |
Es mostren totes 4
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Wikipedia en anglès

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"Absolutely splendid . . . essential for understanding why there is so much bad thinking in political life right now." --David Brooks, New York Times How to Think is a contrarian treatise on why we're not as good at thinking as we assume--but how recovering this lost art can rescue our inner lives from the chaos of modern life.   As a celebrated cultural critic and a writer for national publications like The Atlantic and Harper's, Alan Jacobs has spent his adult life belonging to communities that often clash in America's culture wars. And in his years of confronting the big issues that divide us--political, social, religious--Jacobs has learned that many of our fiercest disputes occur not because we're doomed to be divided, but because the people involved simply aren't thinking.   Most of us don't want to think. Thinking is trouble. Thinking can force us out of familiar, comforting habits, and it can complicate our relationships with like-minded friends. Finally, thinking is slow, and that's a problem when our habits of consuming information (mostly online) leave us lost in the spin cycle of social media, partisan bickering, and confirmation bias.   In this smart, endlessly entertaining book, Jacobs diagnoses the many forces that act on us to prevent thinking--forces that have only worsened in the age of Twitter, "alternative facts," and information overload--and he also dispels the many myths we hold about what it means to think well. (For example: It's impossible to "think for yourself.")   Drawing on sources as far-flung as novelist Marilynne Robinson, basketball legend Wilt Chamberlain, British philosopher John Stuart Mill, and Christian theologian C.S. Lewis, Jacobs digs into the nuts and bolts of the cognitive process, offering hope that each of us can reclaim our mental lives from the impediments that plague us all. Because if we can learn to think together, maybe we can learn to live together, too.

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